The Hemingway seminar will revolve around “islands in the stream”

STORY AND PHOTO OF KAREN BOSSICK

“Islands in the Stream,” Ernest Hemingway’s posthumously published novel about an American painter on the island of Bimini, will provide the context for this year’s Hemingway.

This year’s seminar will be held Thursday through Saturday, September 8-10, at the Community Library.

Guest speakers include Paul Hendrickson, who wrote ‘Hemingway’s Boat: Everything He Loved in Life and Lost’. The book focuses on Hemingway’s life from 1934 to 1961 and draws on unpublished documents to show that Hemingway might be capable of remarkable generosity.

Other speakers include Mark P. Ott, who wrote “A Sea of ​​Change: Ernest Hemingway and the Gulf Stream, a Contextual Biography,” and Karen Osborn, research zoologist for the National Museum of History’s STREAMCODE project. natural from the Smithsonian.

There will also be presentations by Clyde Monyhun, a professor at Boise State University, who will talk about the memories of a lifetime in “Islands in the Stream”, and Stacey Guill of BSU, who will discuss the dock fight in the book.

Martha Williams will discuss the posthumous editing of “Islands in the Stream” and Joel Vilinsky will read “On Being Shot Again: A Gulf Stream Letter”. There will also be a screening of the 1977 Paramount Pictures film adaptation of “Islands in the Stream.”

The seminar begins with an opening reception at 5:00 p.m. Thursday, followed by Ott’s presentation on “A Sea of ​​Change” at 6 p.m.

It will conclude with Hendrickson’s presentation on Saturday, followed by a closing reception hosted by Comida Cubana d’Adelfa de Boise.

The seminar is $80 for in-person attendees, who can register at https://thecommunitylibrary.libcal.com/event/9195505.

It’s $25 for virtual attendees, who can register at https://thecommunitylibrary.libcal.com/event/9195074.

Mary Hemingway found the unpublished novel among 332 works left by her husband when he died. It depicts an American painter at different stages of his life. The first finds him grappling with the deaths of his two youngest children; the second with the news that his eldest son died in the war.

The final act follows the painter as he tracks down and pursues the survivors of a sunken German U-boat on the northern coast of Cuba after learning that they have massacred a village.

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