photographer year – Photo Bolsillo http://photobolsillo.com/ Fri, 25 Mar 2022 20:18:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://photobolsillo.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png photographer year – Photo Bolsillo http://photobolsillo.com/ 32 32 Be inspired by the winners and shortlists of the 2022 Sony World Photography Awards Open Competition https://photobolsillo.com/be-inspired-by-the-winners-and-shortlists-of-the-2022-sony-world-photography-awards-open-competition/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 13:22:53 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/be-inspired-by-the-winners-and-shortlists-of-the-2022-sony-world-photography-awards-open-competition/ During the countdown until the announcement of the big winner, Sony World Photography Awards has another treat for our eyes and our souls. He announced the winners of his category and his shortlist of the 2022 Open competition, rewarding the best single shots of 2021. With over 100 shortlisted photographers in addition to ten category […]]]>

During the countdown until the announcement of the big winner, Sony World Photography Awards has another treat for our eyes and our souls. He announced the winners of his category and his shortlist of the 2022 Open competition, rewarding the best single shots of 2021.

With over 100 shortlisted photographers in addition to ten category winners, this is truly a beautiful and inspiring gallery. So, let’s check them out and get our daily dose of photography inspiration.

Over 170,000 images were submitted to this year’s Open competition, so I think the judging panel had a very difficult task selecting the winners. It will be even harder to choose the overall winner in April, but I’m really curious to see who it will be. It’s scheduled for April 12, so there’s a month left. As for the category winners, each received Sony gear and is competing for Open Photographer of the Year and a main prize of $5,000 (USD).

As well as being displayed in online galleries, the winning and shortlisted photos will be exhibited as part of the Sony World Photography Awards at Somerset House. The exhibition will take place from April 13 to May 2, 2022.

And now I leave you to enjoy the selection of winners and shortlists of this year. Since there are over 100 images in this wonderful gallery, I’ll only share some of my personal favorites so you don’t get lost in scrolling. But if you can’t get enough, be sure to check out the whole gallery at World Photography Organization’s website.

Category winners

© Raido Nurk, Estonia, Winner, Open, Motion, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Anthony Chan, Hong Kong, Winner, Open, Architecture, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Etienne Souchon, France, Winner, Open, Street Photography, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Isabel Salmon, UK, Winner, Open, Creative, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Leonardo Reyes-González, Mexico, Winner, Open, Object, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Scott Wilson, UK, Winner, Open, Natural World & Wildlife, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Simone Corallini, Italy, Winner, Open, Portraiture, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Utsab Ahamed Akash, Bangladesh, Winner, Open, Lifestyle, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Vicente Ansola, Spain, Winner, Open, Landscape, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Thanh Nguyen Phuc, Vietnam, Winner, Open, Travel, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

Selection of shortlists

© Seyed Ali, Iran, Shortlist, Open, Street Photography, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Sujon Adikary, Bangladesh, Shortlist, Open, Travel, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Txema Lacunza Nasterra, Spain, Shortlist, Open, Lifestyle, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Tiho Trichkov, United States of America, Shortlist, Open, Natural World & Wildlife, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Valentina Cipriany, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Shortlist, Open, Creative, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Ute-Christa Scherhag, Germany, Shortlist, Open, Architecture, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Zhenhuan Zhou, China, Shortlist, Open, Motion, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Wonyoung Choi, Korea (Republic of), Shortlist, Open, Architecture, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© François Philippe, France, Selection, Open, Travel, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Abbas Valadi, Iran, Shortlist, Open, Creative, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Assaf Sharon, Israel, Shortlist, Open, Street Photography, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Clair Robins, UK, Shortlist, Open, Creative, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Darshan Ganapathy, India, Shortlist, Open, Travel, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Giulio Casti, Italy, Shortlist, Open, Architecture, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Hend Wahdan, Egypt, Shortlist, Open, Lifestyle, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Isabela Eseverri, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Shortlist, Open, Motion, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Huu Binh Nguyen, Vietnam, Shortlist, Open, Travel, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Junming Chen, China, Shortlist, Open, Architecture, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Ludovic Le Guyader, France, Selection, Open, Street Photography, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Maryia Sapego, Belarus, Shortlist, Open, Object, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Masumi Shiohara, Japan, Shortlist, Open, Object, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Nina TBerg, Germany, Shortlist, Open, Street Photography, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Osman Maasoglu, Turkey, Shortlist, Open, Lifestyle, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Olivier Vauguin, France, Selection, Open, Landscape, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

© Shabnam Maleki, Iran, Shortlist, Open, Creative, 2022 Sony World Photography Awards

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Wildlife Photographer of the Year, 2021 People’s Choice Award Winner https://photobolsillo.com/wildlife-photographer-of-the-year-2021-peoples-choice-award-winner/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 00:05:01 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/wildlife-photographer-of-the-year-2021-peoples-choice-award-winner/ The snap by Italian photographer Cristiano Vendramin, initially among a shortlist of 25 images, has been voted for by more than 31,800 wildlife and nature enthusiasts, according to a press release released Tuesday by organizers from the Natural History Museum in London. . His image and that of the four “highly commended” finalists will be […]]]>

The snap by Italian photographer Cristiano Vendramin, initially among a shortlist of 25 images, has been voted for by more than 31,800 wildlife and nature enthusiasts, according to a press release released Tuesday by organizers from the Natural History Museum in London. .

His image and that of the four “highly commended” finalists will be on display in the Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition currently taking place in London at the Natural History Museum.

The images that reached the final stages were of varied subject matter.

There was a photo of two lions taking shelter from the rain and another of an unusual encounter between an eagle and a bear. A photo of a kangaroo and his joey who managed to survive the devastating bushfires in Australia was much appreciated, as was an image of a dance between two male golden pheasants.

But the big winner is Vendramin, who took his picture in 2019 during a visit to Lake Santa Croce in northern Italy. He noticed the abnormally high water level and the fact that the willows were partially submerged, which created a play of light and reflections on the surface of the lake. According to the press release, Vendramin remembered a friend he had lost who loved the lake.

“I hope my photography will inspire people to understand that the beauty of nature is everywhere around us, and we can be pleasantly surprised by the many landscapes so close to home,” Vendramin said in the press release. .

“I believe that having a daily relationship with nature is increasingly necessary to have a serene and healthy life. Nature photography is therefore important to remind us of this connection.”

Douglas Gurr, director of the museum, said “Vendramin’s poignant image symbolizes the positive impact nature can have on our well-being and our lives”.

Gurr added in the press release, “I hope those who look at this frozen-in-time landscape are reminded of the importance of connecting with the natural world and the steps we all must take to protect it.”

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Nearly 1,400 images competing for the Press Photographer of the Year awards https://photobolsillo.com/nearly-1400-images-competing-for-the-press-photographer-of-the-year-awards/ Mon, 31 Jan 2022 19:59:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/nearly-1400-images-competing-for-the-press-photographer-of-the-year-awards/ Nearly 1,400 images from 100 photographers will compete in 10 categories at the 2022 Press Photographer of the Year awards this month. Although traditionally a gala event, this year’s ceremony will once again take place online due to Covid-19 considerations. The virtual awards on February 18 will include special pre-recorded category messages from a host […]]]>

Nearly 1,400 images from 100 photographers will compete in 10 categories at the 2022 Press Photographer of the Year awards this month.

Although traditionally a gala event, this year’s ceremony will once again take place online due to Covid-19 considerations.

The virtual awards on February 18 will include special pre-recorded category messages from a host of well-known personalities highlighting the talent of Ireland’s many press photographers.

The award judging was deliberated online last weekend, led by former Irish Times editor Frank Miller.

Mr Miller was joined by international photographer Eddie Keogh who has been at the forefront of sports photography for over three decades and is currently the official photographer for the England football team.

The panel also included Helen Healy, originally from Dublin, head of images at the Financial Times.

Judging in the multimedia category was assisted by broadcaster Philip Bromwell and former RTÉ cameraman Michael Lee.

“Irish press photographers… have persevered through another year dominated once again by the pandemic,” said Paul Sherwood, president of the Press Photographers Association of Ireland. “Our members have beautifully captured all aspects of life throughout the year and created a stunning visual record of 2021.”

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2 Bangladeshi photographers honored in UK travel photography competition https://photobolsillo.com/2-bangladeshi-photographers-honored-in-uk-travel-photography-competition/ Thu, 27 Jan 2022 11:01:29 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/2-bangladeshi-photographers-honored-in-uk-travel-photography-competition/ The two photographers have already won numerous national and international photography awards TBS Report January 27, 2022, 2:35 PM Last modification: January 27, 2022, 5:01 PM Pinu Rahman and Mithail Afrige Chowdhury. Photo: courtesy “> Pinu Rahman and Mithail Afrige Chowdhury. Photo: courtesy Two Bangladeshi photographers – Pinu Rahman and Mithail Afrige Chowdhury – have […]]]>

The two photographers have already won numerous national and international photography awards

TBS Report

January 27, 2022, 2:35 PM

Last modification: January 27, 2022, 5:01 PM

Pinu Rahman and Mithail Afrige Chowdhury. Photo: courtesy

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Pinu Rahman and Mithail Afrige Chowdhury. Photo: courtesy

Two Bangladeshi photographers – Pinu Rahman and Mithail Afrige Chowdhury – have been praised for their photography at the 2021 Travel Photographer of the Year (TPOTY) in the UK.

Pinu Rahman’s magnificent aerial photos taken from Noakhali’s Bhasan Char, Paharpur’s Somapura Mahavihara and Naogaon’s Badalgachhi won the second title and were highly commended in the Green Planet and Icons of Travel categories.

Aerial shot by Pinu Rahman.

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Aerial shot by Pinu Rahman.

Aerial shot by Pinu Rahman.

On the other hand, the dramatic candid photo of engineer Mithail Afrige Chowdhury taken from Dhaka airport train station won the title of runner-up in the Smartshot (itravelled) category.

Photo: Mithail Afrige Chowdhury

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Photo: Mithail Afrige Chowdhury

Photo: Mithail Afrige Chowdhury

The two photographers have already won numerous national and international photography awards.

Around 20,000 images were submitted by photographers from 151 countries for the competition this year.

Fortunato Gatto, an Italian photographer based in Scotland, became the overall TPOTY winner for a series of detailed abstract images from his adopted country, showing patterns in the sand of the Hebrides.

Each year, the overall winner receives the ‘Travel Photographer of the Year’ award, with additional winners selected in each of the year’s categories.

TPOTY, the leading travel photography award, has held this event since 2003 to promote talented professional and amateur photographers around the world.

All winning images can be viewed here: tpoty.com

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The success of the competition stuns the photographer | Otago Daily Times News Online https://photobolsillo.com/the-success-of-the-competition-stuns-the-photographer-otago-daily-times-news-online/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 15:30:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/the-success-of-the-competition-stuns-the-photographer-otago-daily-times-news-online/ Mt Cook-based Conservation Department Ranger Hunter Smith describes his victory at the Geography of New Zealand Photographer of the Year is awarded as “absolutely unreal”. Mr Smith (25) was one of 54 finalists, down from around 6,000 nominations for this year’s awards, which were decided earlier this month. Her photograph of contrasting wild pines, taken […]]]>


Mt Cook-based Conservation Department Ranger Hunter Smith describes his victory at the Geography of New Zealand Photographer of the Year is awarded as “absolutely unreal”.

Mr Smith (25) was one of 54 finalists, down from around 6,000 nominations for this year’s awards, which were decided earlier this month. Her photograph of contrasting wild pines, taken by drone near the Ohau A power station, won the aerial photography category, which was won last year by Emma Willetts of Oamaru.

Mr Smith, who moved south to Rotorua about three years ago, said photography was a passion he only discovered relatively recently.

“I kind of always had the creative side of me.

“It didn’t really click that photography was something I could do, because it always seemed like a lot of money, and I was never in the right space for it.”

Since purchasing a camera, however, Mr. Smith hasn’t looked back, and a Pure Photo Adventures workshop with his photography “idols” Rach Stewart, Lee Cook and Daniel Murray three years ago. , prompted him to move south.

“I was like, ‘Yeah, it’s me, I’m going.’ So I did,” he said.

Landscape and astrophotography are must-haves for nature lovers, and working and living in the Mackenzie Basin provided plenty of opportunities for both, he said.

“I love being in nature, for sure. I’m a person who loves the outdoors.”

Mr. Smith would love to become a full-time photographer, but he knew that portraiture was where most photographers succeeded in making a living.

“If I start to absolutely improve my game and keep exploring, it might move me forward.

“I have a feeling that since I’ve been here, I probably have my name a little more there than in the north, because the small communities work like magic.”

The people he lived in had been very supportive of him and he loved to share his work with them, he said.

“I share with them what I see and how I see the Mackenzie through my eyes.”

Mr Smith entered his image of the contrasting pines in the NZ Geo contest because he believed it matched the images he had seen in the past. He had entered the previous years, but had never had a return.

“When I got the email telling me I was a finalist, I was like, ‘Are you sure? Did you make a mistake? “Yes, it was so surreal.”

He traveled to Auckland for the announcement and tried not to hope too much, though he thought he had “devious clues” that he could have won.

When the announcement was made, Mr Smith said his “heart was beating like crazy”.

“I couldn’t believe it – absolutely unreal.”

He received a trophy, a certificate and a cash prize.

Ashley smyth


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Stuff Photographer Wins New Zealand Geographic Photographer of the Year https://photobolsillo.com/stuff-photographer-wins-new-zealand-geographic-photographer-of-the-year/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 00:05:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/stuff-photographer-wins-new-zealand-geographic-photographer-of-the-year/ A Things visual journalist won a prestigious photography competition. Braden Fastier, photojournalist at Nelson Courier and founding member of the Toru Photography Collective, was crowned New Zealand Geographic Photographer of the Year for a broad portfolio of social documentaries. Fastier said it was “pretty cool” to receive the award for best photographer, given the “incredible” […]]]>


A Things visual journalist won a prestigious photography competition.

Braden Fastier, photojournalist at Nelson Courier and founding member of the Toru Photography Collective, was crowned New Zealand Geographic Photographer of the Year for a broad portfolio of social documentaries.

Fastier said it was “pretty cool” to receive the award for best photographer, given the “incredible” work on display at the awards ceremony on Wednesday night.

“It’s what you look for every day, it’s for print and for the web, but getting that recognition is pretty awesome. “

READ MORE:
* “Right place with the right lens”: photojournalist Stuff Alden Williams wins prestigious award
* The NZ Geographic Photographer of the Year exhibition presents “a year in Aotearoa”
* Four Stuff Photographers shortlisted for the New Zealand Geographic Award
* Collective focus on Nelson’s life in a new photography exhibition

Stuff Photographer Braden Fastier is New Zealand Geographic Photographer of the Year 2021.

Braden Fastier / Stuff

Stuff Photographer Braden Fastier is New Zealand Geographic Photographer of the Year 2021.

Fastier first won the Nikon Photographer of the Year award and also won the Resene Color award.

He said he chose his portfolio carefully, putting aside his favorite photos each month and chatting with friends and colleagues.

“It’s just to find the time to polish… there’s a lot of photography, it’s everywhere. There are millions of photos uploaded every day, so you wonder, “how is this going to be different from something someone took on their phone?” “

Stuff's regional editor Victoria Guild said Fastier's attention to detail sets him apart.

Braden Fastier / Stuff

Stuff’s regional editor Victoria Guild said Fastier’s attention to detail sets him apart.

“I approach every job with the attitude that there’s going to be a really amazing photo here, you just might have to look a little harder for that.”

ThingsNelson’s regional editor Victoria Guild said it was Fastier’s attention to detail that set him apart.

“Braden is always committed to producing the best possible image, and that is reflected in the quality of his work. He has a style that is instantly recognizable and we are very fortunate to be able to showcase his work in our print products and online.

In a statement released Wednesday evening, New Zealand Geographic editor James Frankham said Fastier’s images were rich in color and context, were technically sound and demonstrated an original and imaginative approach to photojournalism.

New Zealand Geographic editor James Frankham said Braden Fastier's images were rich in color and context.

Braden Fastier / Stuff

New Zealand Geographic editor James Frankham said Braden Fastier’s images were rich in color and context.

“Fastier’s images captured a second level of meaning – the humor of the paperwork around a pair of concrete playground seals, a mask on a statue, phone calls on a golf course – the realities oddities of life in Aotearoa in 2021 that go some way to understand the year that has been.

“His approach borrows from street photography, but with the discipline and talent for storytelling of a photojournalist, values ​​that make Braden Fastier a worthy holder of the title of Photographer of the Year 2021.”

New Zealand Geographic has received more than 6,000 nominations for the title of Photographer of the Year this season, a record in the 13-year history of the competition.

“2021 started out as a cure for 2020, but in many ways it felt like a repeat of history. This was reflected in the registrations we received. There were images of more blockages, more protests and cultural themes were also close to last year – Covid-19, Black Lives Matter and a process of adjusting to smaller, more isolated lives. “

Fastier said he approached every job with the idea that there would be an amazing photo, he just had to look for it.

Braden Fastier / Stuff

Fastier said he approached every job with the idea that there would be an amazing photo, he just had to look for it.

“The images also reflected, however, our resilience as a nation, our creativity and our determination. There were landscapes of quiet solitude, without the rush of tourists. There were images of small circles of family and friends. Even the images of wild animals were silent and careful studies of behavior, marked by the patience of the photographer. “

2021 winners

Nikon Photographer of the Year – Braden Fastier

Young Photographer of the Year – Mattheus Elwood

Ockham Residential People’s Choice – Grant Nicholson

Resene Color Award – Braden Fastier

Electric Kiwi Wildlife – Danilo Hegg

Resene Landscape – William Patino

Lumix Company – George Heard

Built Environment Resene – Matthew Connolly

Progear PhotoStory – Ralph Piezas

Aerial Lightforce – Hunter Smith



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Photography is a family affair, in a way, for Seth Owens https://photobolsillo.com/photography-is-a-family-affair-in-a-way-for-seth-owens/ Fri, 10 Dec 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/photography-is-a-family-affair-in-a-way-for-seth-owens/ Photography is a family affair for Seth Owens, an avid bird watcher and aspiring wildlife photographer in his first year specializing in Fisheries and Wildlife Biology at UND. Owens’ younger sister Sydney has a thriving photography and video business in their hometown of Hillsboro, North Dakota. But where his specialty is people, his older brother […]]]>


Photography is a family affair for Seth Owens, an avid bird watcher and aspiring wildlife photographer in his first year specializing in Fisheries and Wildlife Biology at UND. Owens’ younger sister Sydney has a thriving photography and video business in their hometown of Hillsboro, North Dakota. But where his specialty is people, his older brother says he continues to focus on birds and other wildlife.

“I’m still relatively new to photography and still learning,” Owens said. “She was able to help me a lot. I borrowed a lot of (equipment) from him and borrowed a lot of knowledge. Even though she is my younger sister, I admire her for my photographs. She knows more than I do.

Here’s a look at the photo equipment Owens uses on his birding tours:

  • Camera: Nikon D500. “It’s very nice,” he said. “It becomes difficult with the cold. It works great in the summer, but sometimes the batteries run down quickly in cold weather. You just have to pack some extras.

  • Lens: Sigma zoom lens 150 to 600 millimeters. “It lets me zoom in, and it’s choppy, which is good,” Owens said. “When I get the birds up close, I’ll bring it down to maybe 150 millimeters.” When I have birds far away or if I want to fill the frame a little more, I open it up to 600. “

  • Tripod: Avant-garde Alta Pro. “I’m looking to upgrade, but they don’t come cheap,” Owens said. It also uses a gimbal head, which absorbs some of the weight of the large lens and makes it easier to move the lens freely. “I think the gimbal heads are great because you can move around so easily when they’re not locked,” he said.

As with everything, developing skills as a wildlife photographer takes practice, and Grand Forks, with its variety of habitats, provides a perfect classroom for learning the ropes, Owens says.

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“I learned a lot just by training, and that’s how I got really comfortable with this camera and this setup,” he said. “For just about anything, it just takes time.”


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Opening reception “Conservation in biodiversity” Photograph by Joshua Asel – https://photobolsillo.com/opening-reception-conservation-in-biodiversity-photograph-by-joshua-asel/ Thu, 09 Dec 2021 00:49:10 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/opening-reception-conservation-in-biodiversity-photograph-by-joshua-asel/ Since 2012 Joshua Asel has worked as an advocate to create visual communication stories that cover threatened, endangered, keystone and witness species. California condors, rare marine mammals, and coastal landscapes are all part of this small cross section of Joshua’s largest volume of internationally renowned photographic work. All of the wildlife featured in this exhibit […]]]>


Since 2012 Joshua Asel has worked as an advocate to create visual communication stories that cover threatened, endangered, keystone and witness species. California condors, rare marine mammals, and coastal landscapes are all part of this small cross section of Joshua’s largest volume of internationally renowned photographic work. All of the wildlife featured in this exhibit are benefactors of successful conservation efforts.

Joshua Asel is an award-winning photographer and certified marine ecology naturalist with a focus on coastal and marine habitats. He was recently accepted into the prestigious International League of Conservation Photographers, signed for Hakai Magazine as a photographer and writer, and is sponsored by Nikon USA. His awards include California Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2016 and NANPA (North American) Showcase Top 20 2019. Joshua’s publications also include National Geographic, Defenders of Wildlife, Alaska Airlines Magazine, The Press Democrat and several scientific papers, among others. Website: https://www.joshasel.com

FREE. No RSVP required. Light snacks provided. More details here:
https://openingreceptionjoshuaaselartexhibit.eventbrite.com/


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Historical photographer of the year competition: discover the winning photos of 2021 https://photobolsillo.com/historical-photographer-of-the-year-competition-discover-the-winning-photos-of-2021/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 01:45:08 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/historical-photographer-of-the-year-competition-discover-the-winning-photos-of-2021/ (CNN) – “The past is never dead,” Nobel Prize winning novelist William Faulkner once wrote. “It didn’t even happen.” This famous quote could apply to many winners of this year’s Historic Photographer of the Year competition, in which photographers from around the world shared images of the historic sites, landscapes and structures in which they […]]]>


(CNN) – “The past is never dead,” Nobel Prize winning novelist William Faulkner once wrote. “It didn’t even happen.”

This famous quote could apply to many winners of this year’s Historic Photographer of the Year competition, in which photographers from around the world shared images of the historic sites, landscapes and structures in which they live.

Entries were judged on “originality, composition and technical competence”, as well as the context of the image and the story behind it.

Dan Korn, vice president of the Sky History network in the UK and one of the contest judges, noted that despite everything, creativity was still flourishing during the pandemic.

“There have been so many restrictions, constraints and hardships for so many people over the past two years,” he said. “But seeing some of the wonderful works on display here and the iconic and important sites around the world captured so vividly was a sign that history and humanity are alive and well in all their glory in 2021.”

This year’s award-winning photographs come from places as far away as Wales, Brazil and Turkey. Here are some important points.

A winner in Wales

This year’s overall award went to Steve Liddiard for his photograph of the Whiteford Point Lighthouse in Wales. This unique cast iron structure, built in 1865, has long been a favorite subject for photography. Liddiard captured the lighthouse at a dramatic moment, winning the admiration of the judges.

By day, Liddiard works as an associate practitioner for the National Health Service (NHS).

“Who would have thought!” he wrote on his Instagram page. “A guy (wandering) about three years ago exploring Wales to help my own sanity by taking pictures with my camera phone would evolve into this.”

Some historians believe that Bamburgh was the model for Sir Lancelot’s castle, Joyous Garde.

Scott Antcliffe

Other notable images

UK channel History Hit TV and heritage conservation group Historic England also sponsored the awards, meaning there were quite a few entries from all over the UK.

Other winning images in the competition were photos of Hereford Cathedral, St Michael’s Tower in Glastonbury and Scott Antcliffe’s sunset over Bamburgh Castle in Northumberland (pictured above).

There were also several winning images from other corners of the globe.

The Brazilian Oscar Niemeyer is considered one of the titans of modern architecture.

Brazilian Oscar Niemeyer is considered one of the titans of modern architecture.

Alistair

A photographer who identifies himself as simply Alistair was selected for his photo of the Niterói Museum of Contemporary Art in Rio de Janeiro, designed by Oscar Niemeyer. The building, which visitors say looks like everything from a UFO to a concrete flower, is a popular destination for architecture enthusiasts.

The remains of a downed US Navy Douglas C-117D have become a popular backdrop for music videos.

The remains of a downed US Navy Douglas C-117D have become a popular backdrop for music videos.

Yevhen Samuchenko

One of the most striking entries was the wreckage of a US Navy plane that crashed near Sólheimasandur, Iceland in 1973. It was taken by Ukrainian photographer Yevhen Samuchenko, who also photographed for UNESCO and the Royal Photography Society.



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Landscape photography competition rewards unique approaches of the genre https://photobolsillo.com/landscape-photography-competition-rewards-unique-approaches-of-the-genre/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 22:01:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/landscape-photography-competition-rewards-unique-approaches-of-the-genre/ The genre of landscape photography typically involves cliffs, gorges, mountain peaks, and other monumental natural formations captured from a panoramic point of view through a wide-angle lens. The Natural Landscape Photography Awards (NLPA) inaugural selection for Photography of the Year is an unexpected and delicious break from tradition. What at first glance looks like an […]]]>




The genre of landscape photography typically involves cliffs, gorges, mountain peaks, and other monumental natural formations captured from a panoramic point of view through a wide-angle lens. The Natural Landscape Photography Awards (NLPA) inaugural selection for Photography of the Year is an unexpected and delicious break from tradition. What at first glance looks like an icy snow cap shining under an amorphous, rust-tinged moon is actually the tip of a miniature iceberg atop a black sand beach in Iceland, decorated with an orange pebble. near. The friendly parody of compositional silhouette photography perhaps the most common in landscape photography makes it an ironic winning entry in an often serious category. “Landscapes come in many sizes,” photographer Steve Alterman wrote in the statement he submitted to the competition.

Aerial view of the year, Paul Hoelen
Intimate and abstract of the year, Franka Gabler

Despite the many landscape photography competitions, the organizers of the NLPA felt that few competitions placed importance on minimizing post-processing. They hoped that stricter rules – such as banning the practice of image composition, in which elements from different images are combined in one photograph – as well as the use of distortions and others. manipulations – would allow more realistic photographs to shine. “This is a competition for digital and film photographers who appreciate the realism of their images and edit with this in mind,” says the organization on its website.

“I’ve grown increasingly frustrated with the state of landscape and nature photography over the past 10 to 15 years,” Matt Payne, NLPA organizer and podcast host. F-Stop Collaborate and listen, says Hyperallergic. The photographs that win contests and go viral on social media, he observed, “have mostly been manipulated in Photoshop to grab your attention and make you jump out of the water.” As such, the NLPA guidelines use the same standard adopted by the National Press Photographers Association in 1991: Photographs should not “fool” viewers.

Payne is concerned that the separation between photographs true to the moment they were captured and those edited in post-production may erode public interest and confidence in landscape photography. “It’s like you go on Netflix… and you’re like, ‘I really want to watch a really good documentary tonight,’ and you end up watching this documentary and it’s amazing. And then you find out a week more. late that everything was just invented, ”recalls Payne.

Photographer of the Year, Eric Bennett

The NLPA – which has awarded awards in seven categories spanning the best Grand Landscape, Nightscape, Aerial and more – celebrates under-decorated naturalist photographers. And the winning photographs demonstrate that they can induce as much wonder and splendor as photos that endure more creative quarrels.

A photograph by Eric Bennett, winner of the Photographer of the Year award, highlights two dying brown leaves resting on what appears to be an abstractly patterned boulder that glows in blue light. But, as Bennett explains, it actually represents a puddle in which leaves have fallen and decomposed. “As these leaves break down, they release these oils, and these oils may have accumulated and had different densities,” he explains. “I like … to create more mystery – asking questions rather than giving answers.”

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