Glasgow GoMA marks milestone anniversary with first new exhibition since reopening

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Computing is a building that has reinvented itself time and time again after having previously been a home, bank and library.

Dating back to 1777 when it was commissioned as a mansion for tobacco merchant William Cunninghame, the Royal Exchange Square site took on a whole new lease of life when it opened as Glasgow’s Gallery of Modern Art (GoMA) in 1996.

And it’s a group of nine female artists whose work is taking center stage as the first new exhibition since the gallery reopened on April 26 with the easing of covid restrictions.

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Under the mandate of an independent organization, Glasgow Life, which manages cultural and sporting venues for City Council, GoMA marks a year of celebration. However, this comes out of a difficult time for ALEO when its ability to generate income was severely affected during the pandemic, despite this, Glasgow Life recently pledged to reopen around 90 locations in the city after the council has agreed to subscribe for an amount of £ 100million. a one-year financing guarantee.

Three of the artists whose work is on display, they are from left – Jo Ganter, Kate V Robertson and Jacki Parry. The artwork in the background is Double Son of Rubble by artist Sara Barker. Photograph by Colin Mearns.

Drink in the Beauty is the first show to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the museum, a venue that has steadily increased its number of visitors to nearly 600,000 a year before the pandemic.

The exhibition features works by women artists from the renowned Glasgow Museums collection and explores representations of landscape, geology and climate justice, by artists who have documented and recorded the natural environment.

It draws on rare work by botanist Anna Atkins from the Glasgow Museums Collection, which includes a rare set from her first publication Photographs of British Algae: Cyanotype Impressions 1843 – 52, as well as recent acquisitions including works by Carol Rhodes and Sara Barker.

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Curator Katie Bruce said: “We were just about to start this exhibit before Christmas and then everything changed again. While we were able to do some things online, there is just the joy of being able to sit in front of it. a work of art and admire it.That’s why I thought the name of the exhibition was very appropriate because people can just drink in the beauty.

“We are in a time where social distancing makes it even better to visit a gallery with a little more space and a smaller number.”

The exhibition also features artists’ films borrowed from Jo Ganter and Jade Montserrat, and works by Ilana Halperin, Jacki Parry, Kate V Robertson and Amanda Thomson.

Artist Jo Ganter is profiled in the doorway of his video installation Urgent Nature.  The film is accompanied by music by David Rothenberg.  Photograph by Colin Mearns.

Artist Jo Ganter is profiled in the doorway of his video installation “Urgent Nature”. The film is accompanied by music by David Rothenberg. Photograph by Colin Mearns.

The title of the exhibit comes from a quote “Drink in Beauty and Marvel at the Meaning of What You See” by prominent environmentalist and author Rachel Louise Carson. It has been more than 50 years since Carson wrote his groundbreaking book “Silent Spring” on the catastrophic and widespread effects of pesticide use and this publication is often credited with advancing the global environmental movement.

The title underlies the theme of the show, which aims to inspire visitors to reflect on our connections to nature in the landscape around us and our responses to global injustices.

Councilor Baillie Annette Christie, speaking on behalf of Glasgow Life, said: “We are delighted to present ‘Drink in the Beauty’ at GoMA. The exhibit celebrates the work of nine innovative women artists in what is a curated, women-centered exhibit, while opening important conversations about the environment and climate change.

“Right now, more than ever, exhibitions like this highlight the importance of art and culture in the well-being of people and I am sure visitors to GoMA will be delighted with this new exhibition, which includes works of art from the Glasgow Museums collection which will be presented for the first time. ”

As Scotland’s most visited museum of modern and contemporary art, GoMA occupies a unique position in Glasgow as a contemporary art collecting institution.

Drink in the Beauty exhibit at GoMA.  The first new exhibition at the Gallery of Modern Art (GoMA) since the gallery reopened in April and the first exhibition to celebrate the museum's 25th anniversary.  Pictured artist Kate V Robertson with

Drink in the Beauty exhibit at GoMA. The first new exhibition at the Gallery of Modern Art (GoMA) since the gallery reopened in April and the first exhibition to celebrate the museum’s 25th anniversary. Pictured artist Kate V Robertson with

Ms Bruce added that there have been some significant acquisitions and emissions with exciting months ahead as well.

Since opening its doors 25 years ago, GoMA has organized over 200 exhibitions with various artists from around the world, as well as collecting powerful works from local, UK and international artists and developing a program award-winning learning.

Some of the early collecting activities included works by Jo Spence, Bruce Lacey, Bridget Riley and Niki de Saint Phalle which are now recognized as key acquisitions for Glasgow museums.

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