Dramatic footage shows the extent of erosion on the Norfolk coast

Posted:
11:46 December 17, 2021



The before and after photos show how drastic the changes have been on our coastline in just ten years.

Local photographer Mike Page took bird’s eye views of some of Norfolk’s landmarks and coastline over the past decades.

Recently Mr. Page stepped out again – and the view from the sky shows the effect the weather has had on the beaches of Winterton and Happisburgh.


2011: Winterton Beach was only a short walk from the sand dunes and the Dunes Cafe was still in place by the sea.
– Credit: Mike Page

Ten years ago, Winterton Beach was accessible from the dunes after a short descent to shore.

Ancient landmarks such as the Dunes Cafe were still visible from the air in 2011.

Only a decade later, the beach was cut off from the dunes as erosion created a steep drop off a cliff.

After the choppy waters caused further erosion of the Cliffs of Winterton, the cafe had to be demolished in 2020.


2021: Winterton beach is inaccessible from the sand dunes, as the formation of soft sandy cliffs has a steep slope.

2021: Winterton beach is inaccessible from the sand dunes, as the formation of soft sandy cliffs has a steep slope.
– Credit: Mike Page

Over the past decade many homes in Happisburgh have been overrun by sea and ten years of erosion has taken their toll on the landscape.

Experts predict that 50 meters of land will be lost by 2035 in the village.


2011: Erosion is already evident in Happisburgh, but many people still live near the edge.

2011: Erosion is already evident in Happisburgh, but many people still live near the edge.
– Credit: Mike Page


2021: The cliffs of Happisburgh move further west as the sea demands more and more land.

2021: The cliffs of Happisburgh move further west as the sea demands more and more land.
– Credit: Mike Page


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