Photography – Photo Bolsillo http://photobolsillo.com/ Fri, 03 Sep 2021 19:15:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://photobolsillo.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Photography – Photo Bolsillo http://photobolsillo.com/ 32 32 A student photographer is passionate about football and nature | https://photobolsillo.com/a-student-photographer-is-passionate-about-football-and-nature/ https://photobolsillo.com/a-student-photographer-is-passionate-about-football-and-nature/#respond Fri, 03 Sep 2021 18:10:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/a-student-photographer-is-passionate-about-football-and-nature/ For Andy Tomek of Shiner, it all started with trying to find something to do someday. The 17-year-old started photography when he was only 14 years old. He credited his father, Bobby Tomek, who was also a photographer, his mentor and inspiration who ultimately led him to buy a camera. “He’s had his own photography […]]]>

For Andy Tomek of Shiner, it all started with trying to find something to do someday.

The 17-year-old started photography when he was only 14 years old. He credited his father, Bobby Tomek, who was also a photographer, his mentor and inspiration who ultimately led him to buy a camera.

“He’s had his own photography studio in Shiner for a long, long time,” Tomek said. “He just had some material and I just picked it up and started trying to figure things out.”

Taking a camera and playing with the plethora of lenses for the first time would lead him to the family backyard where he would experience nature photography. With a Nikon D3000 with a 70-300mm lens attached, various flowers, insects and sometimes deer would be the focus of its lens, Tomek said.

“I’ve always loved nature,” Tomek said. “We have all kinds of things next to our house and it’s just very quaint and relaxing.”

Before that, having fun with a simple compact camera was the breadth of his photography knowledge, and the learning curve that came with transitioning to an advanced setup felt very natural and gradual, Tomek said.

“I slowly switched to modes that had fewer automatic settings until I started turning to manual only,” Tomek said.

After a few years of trying to learn the ropes and photographing nature, Tomek said he has taken a big step forward in his profession as a photographer.

“In 2019 I started playing sports and that’s where things started to change,” Tomek said. “So instead of just messing around doing it as a hobby, I took it more seriously and would say the pace picked up.”

Tomek recalled his first sporting event he photographed, which was a baseball game in Hallettsville. Eventually, Tomek’s skills will allow him to land his freelance job with the Victoria Advocate to photograph a soccer game between Shiner and Weimer in 2019.

Besides soccer, Tomek said that soccer is another sport that he is also passionate about shooting. The most exciting part of being on the pitch is the unpredictability that comes with it, Tomek said.

“Being able to predict these things is always like an adrenaline rush for me when doing football photography,” Tomek said. “Get that picture that turns out to be perfect. “

Even though Tomek is more focused on sports photography, with an arsenal of Nikon gear close at hand, he hasn’t forgotten his first love for nature photography and regularly goes out to photograph Mother Nature.

“For me nature photography is about loving the Aransas Wildlife Refuge and having a fun relaxing day that doesn’t have a specific schedule,” Tomek said. “With sports it’s a lot quicker to plan, do things as you go and know what to do with them right away.”

Photographing sport and nature both come with its own form of satisfaction, Tomek said. But seeing his sports photos printed in the paper is what gives him the most joy.

Between juggling being a photographer and having a job as a student worker, Tomek is also a full-time student at UHV pursuing a degree in history.

“My mom and dad were both very passionate about journalism,” Tomek said. “I grew up with an interest in history because of the way I was raised and I just think it goes really well with photography and journalism.”

For Tomek, good photography is about finding that precise moment in a photograph.

“It’s kind of the highlight of what’s going on, whether it’s someone getting tackled in a football game or a bird that has light that just hits it,” Tomek said.

Duy Vu is a photojournalist for the Victoria Advocate. You can reach him at 361-574-1204.


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Hiro Obituary | Fashion photography https://photobolsillo.com/hiro-obituary-fashion-photography/ https://photobolsillo.com/hiro-obituary-fashion-photography/#respond Fri, 27 Aug 2021 19:35:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/hiro-obituary-fashion-photography/ The biggest surprise of photographer Hiro’s images of the 60s and 70s is not their unprecedented imagery, but the fact that these images were made by hand from the main elements of photography. He uses light adjusted to the millimeter, in particular to project famous faces into the shadows; shutter speed calibrated to the millisecond; […]]]>

The biggest surprise of photographer Hiro’s images of the 60s and 70s is not their unprecedented imagery, but the fact that these images were made by hand from the main elements of photography. He uses light adjusted to the millimeter, in particular to project famous faces into the shadows; shutter speed calibrated to the millisecond; and used color filters, multiple exposures for a kinetic effect and unlimited patience in the darkroom, to compose his imaginations. He also pushed live owls, ants, and fish, as well as tricky top models, to pose in the particular way he needed. His influence can be seen in most fashion photography today, but with the effects now achieved digitally, without Hiro’s planning and savage spontaneity.

Hiro – short for Yasuhiro Wakabayashi – deceased at the age of 90, was a photographer before and long after his decades in fashion, but it was his experimental shots from the early 1960s, especially for jewelry commercials, that transformed the way these luxuries have since been viewed, as sculptures in a landscape, or witty accessories. Anything could and would be introduced – a ruby-adorned ox hoof, an owl (fed a living mouse to ensure cooperation) amused by a jeweled frog. After Hiro, it was the norm.

A gold Elsa Peretti cuff modeled on a bone, with a ladybug, 1984. Hiro never used digital enhancement to produce his sublime images. Photograph: Hiro / c / o Hamilton Gallery in New York

Hiro’s take on glamor was about mood, a state of mind – it allowed models a visible inner life – rather than the grand narratives of the social context that dominated magazines from the late 1940s to the 1950s. Its use of color was more daring than that of Erwin Blumenfeld and, supported by new printing inks, it was designed for hard-hitting magazine covers. His beauty shots, centered on the foot or the face, were more tactile than those of Irving Penn; the toes Hiro photographed for a Vogue podiatry feature touch hot, rough stones and slithy octopus tentacles, and you feel their textures with your eyes.

Hiro’s journey to becoming a great American photographer, though unrecognized, was more surprising than his photos, and his darkness and deprivation underlined his imagination. He was born in Shanghai, where his college father wrote a Chinese-Japanese dictionary and possibly spied for his native Japan. His parents and four siblings lived there until Japanese troops invaded the city in 1937, when they were sent to occupied Beijing (now Beijing). There, the boy attended an army-controlled school until at age 14 he was drafted into the Japanese occupation army in its last, most brutal phase. After the Japanese surrender, the family was interned, then returned to Tokyo, where a million people were left homeless after the US bombing of March 1945. The Wakabayashis had $ 3 and the things they carried. They dug a trench, covered it with corrugated iron, and it was their home.

Self-portrait, 1990, by Hiro.  The darkness and deprivation of his youth underpinned his imagination.
Self-portrait, 1990, by Hiro. The darkness and deprivation of his youth underpinned his imagination. Photograph: Hiro / c / o Hamilton Gallery in New York

Hiro was more educated, but, like other Japanese during the American occupation, his real education was in American culture, exceptionally through the photographs in glossy magazines thrown out by guests of American hotels where he worked, or by the wives of the officers he taught. Japanese. All Americans seemed to have cameras, and Hiro acquired one, his subject being the strangeness of his resurgent city. His dreams were of the United States, mostly of the style photographed by Richard Avedon. After years of devout savings, and despite the family’s disapproval, in 1954 he traveled to Los Angeles, then crossed the continent by bus to New York, determined to work for Avedon.

It actually happened, within two years. Hiro quickly dropped out of photography school (he already had a unique perspective) and worked as a teacher of commercial photographers before the Avedon studio offered him an apprenticeship. This did not last long as Avedon saw that his pupil was already a complete original, and in 1957 persuaded his own commissioned editor, Alexey Brodovitch, artistic director of Harper’s Bazaar, to use the beginner’s work. Avedon and Hiro shared a studio for years on an equal footing and Hiro took over from Avedon as lead photographer at Harper’s in 1963. They were never rivals, both independent in the city after Hiro took over. created his own studio. Avedon remained Hiro’s No.1 fan and promoter.

Fashion paid well, especially jewelry ads: Hiro photographed the designs of his friend Elsa Peretti for Tiffany’s for almost 40 years until 2020. him visual license, his adventurous abstraction was old-fashioned, too subtle and introverted for one. world of raw bling, branding and models. In the 90s, magazines often reverted to cataloging enviable products, as they did before the Avedon and Penn 1940s revolt.

Hiro used a live owl for his photo of a David Webb jewel in 1963 © HIRO
Hiro used a live owl for his photo of a David Webb jewel in 1963. Photograph: Hiro / c / o Hamilton Gallery in New York

Hiro’s spontaneous side loved reporting, although the results often looked polished; when Harper’s declined his offer to cover the Apollo 11 moon shot in 1969, he still went to Florida and shot near-abstracts in light of the explosion. Harper’s has entrusted its editorial pages to the best. (He loved space, and his photo of a rack of astronaut training suits, cramped like it’s already in a capsule, is an enduring image of NASA.)

He also took quiet celebrity portraits and technically accomplished images for gallery sale, with no day going by without a photo being taken. Hiro could enter an image so deeply that Avedon described him as sitting motionless for hours staring at a footprint, as if in Zen meditation.

Hiro’s return visits to Japan were few, camera in hand, and he became a naturalized US citizen in 1990. He married Elizabeth Clark, a set designer, in 1959, and her, their sons, Gregory and Hiro, and a sister, survive him. .

Hiro (Yasuhiro Wakabayashi), photographer, born November 3, 1930; passed away on August 15, 2021


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Can I sue a photographer colleague for producing images that look like mine? + Other questions on artists’ rights, answers https://photobolsillo.com/can-i-sue-a-photographer-colleague-for-producing-images-that-look-like-mine-other-questions-on-artists-rights-answers/ https://photobolsillo.com/can-i-sue-a-photographer-colleague-for-producing-images-that-look-like-mine-other-questions-on-artists-rights-answers/#respond Thu, 26 Aug 2021 05:30:19 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/can-i-sue-a-photographer-colleague-for-producing-images-that-look-like-mine-other-questions-on-artists-rights-answers/ Have you ever wondered what your rights are as an artist? There is no clear manual to consult, but we are here to help. Katarina Feder, vice-president of Artists’ Rights Society, answers all kinds of questions about the kind of control artists have – and don’t have – over their work. Do you have a […]]]>

Have you ever wondered what your rights are as an artist? There is no clear manual to consult, but we are here to help. Katarina Feder, vice-president of Artists’ Rights Society, answers all kinds of questions about the kind of control artists have – and don’t have – over their work.

Do you have a question for yourself? E-mail [email protected] and it can be answered in a future article.

I am a successful photographer who made a name for myself with large format photographs of skateboarders and their injuries. Imagine my surprise when I recently visited an upscale skate shop and discovered a photo that looked like one of mine but didn’t take. Someone is stealing my schtick. Can I continue?

I watched skateboarding at the Tokyo Olympics and it seems injury is a growing industry. These guys are falling a lot.

All kidding aside, I’m sorry to tell you that you probably have little legal recourse to her.e. In the United States, copyright applies only to works “fixed in any tangible means of expression“, Which means that the ideas, of sophisticated concepts for dinners to vanity for a series of paintings, can not be protected by copyright. You own the copyright in your photographs from the time you develop them, but the general idea behind them isunfortunately in this case-to win.

This issue recently appeared with a photograph that the pop star Olivia Rodrigo staged to promote her “Sour Prom” concert, which was more reminiscent of the cover of 1994 hole album Live through it. In it, Rodrigo wears the same style of crown and wears the same type of flowers as the woman on the Hole album cover, and her makeup is applied in a similar vertical style. Rodrigo went on to pay this as a tribute, though she didn’t tag Courtney Love or the original photographer, Ellen von Unwerth, in her Instagram post of the photo. It smelled like fish, and not at all the spirit of a teenager, but in the New York Times, von Unwerth admitted that she couldn’t do more than be annoyed about it.

That said, prosecution isn’t the only place of retaliation in cases like these (for more on this, see the answer to our next question). When it comes to “who did it first” or “who did it best,” social media is a powerful force. Consider the backlash when Juergen Teller shot Rhianna for Vogue and many thought he had unfairly appropriated the style of Mickalene Thomas. The court of public opinion is quite noisy these days. You can always try to make your point there.

What Pornhub’s “Classic Nudes” page looked like when it launched last month …

I read the New York Post every morning, but even my hardened sensibility was shocked by their report on Pornhub’s latest public relations stunt: an app that takes you to the dirtiest nude paintings in a given museum, then animates them with pornographic actors. How is this legal at any level?

When it comes to copyright, I may be a bit prudish, but when works are in the public domain, I’m all for letting go. This is why I loved Pornhub’s new venture so much, reimagining European masterpieces, porn-style, in the hope that tourists would add them to their list of MILV (museums that i ‘would like to visit). What about legality? Oh, it’s all legal (although that didn’t stop Pornhub from getting in trouble, we’ll get to that a bit later).

Here’s why: As we have established, copyright only exists for the lifetime of the creator plus an additional 70 years post-mortem. After that, the works are in the “public domain”, an image that evokes a grassy field on which anyone can graze their cattle.

And Pornhub did, by hiring actors from adult entertainment cast My Sweet Apple to push the plot forward, so to speak, on paintings like Courbet’s. The origin of the world (1866) which is in the Musée d’Orsay, along with other works from the collections of the Met, the National Gallery and the Prado, among others. It was a strange thing to spend your advertising budget and it seems designed to outraged art historians, but as the works in question have passed copyright protection, museums have little reason to sue. lawsuit.

Still, that didn’t stop the Louvre from threatening or the Uffizi Gallery from sending Pornhub a cease and desist letter. Seemingly scared, site deleted all art inspired porn from their site, and many works of art that inspired him, leaving only a few lonely Impressionist paintings to stimulate what we can only guess to be a very specific segment of his audience.

Left to Right: KK Downing, Glenn Tipton, Rob Halford and Ian Hill of Judas Priest perform on stage - Unleashed In The East album cover session taken in July 1979. (Photo by Fin Costello / Redferns)

Left to right: KK Downing, Glenn Tipton, Rob Halford and Ian Hill of Judas Priest perform on stage in July 1979. (Photo by Fin Costello / Redferns)

I was reading a interview with Stephen King, and he said he originally included the lyrics to the song “You have one more thing to come ” by English heavy metal band Judas Priest as an epigram in their 2008 novel Key to the Duma. But, he said, “they or they [the band] came back and said they wanted $ 50,000 plus royalties. And I said, ‘Damn that shit! It’s not going to happen. ‘ So I made us a doggerel of my own. Why would it cost so much money to print the lyrics of a song?

Knowing Stephen King’s reverence for classic rock and his enormous success as a creator, it’s quite surprising that he chose not to pay the $ 50,000 (and that he was able to come close to the dizzying lyrical heights of “Yesyou have another thing to come “!).

When it comes to copyright for songs, the music industry is really using all the buffalo. There are broadcast rights if you want to play the song on TV, performing rights if you want to play the song at a political rally, and there is printing rights if you want to reproduce lyrics or sheet music. These are useful when it comes to epigrams, merchandising, and lyric printing on soda cans.

Breaking down the rights in this way can be useful when different people are responsible for writing the lyrics and the music, as Elton John and Bernie Taupin did. (In this case, Judas Priest appears to have collectively rushed off the track to complete their 1982 album Scream for revenge, so they would probably all share the $ 50,000 royalty.)

As to why this particular license cost so much, I can only guess that the invoice was based on the expected sales for King’s book. Lyric printing rights usually break down to one cent per unit, and it wouldn’t be unexpected for King to sell five million copies. Although with the soaring Delta variant I would personally recommend The stall– whose title is, of course, based on lyrics by Bruce Springsteen.

Photo: Lionel Bonaventure / AFP via Getty Images.

Photo: Lionel Bonaventure / AFP via Getty Images.

I’ve heard that the creators of Black TikTok are on strike. Doesn’t TikTok own its content? Do these creators have a union? How it works?

It is true that TikTok is one of the most confusing social media platforms. It’s more about lip-syncing and dancing than political arguments with strangers, and if you want to show off an outfit you have to jump in the air to get on first. When in Rome!

The fact that dance is one of the primary means of communication on TikTok means that its main creators have found a loophole in the perennial problem with social media – that companies usually own all the content you post on their platforms. (To see this unfold, consider the case of black photographers who recently sued Buzzfeed for incorporating their BLM Instagram protest photos into a story.)

The dance, however, is different. Although TikTok owns the rights to the videos, they do not own the rights to the dances they contain. This is new territory for copyright, as dancing has only recently become lucrative enough to argue through social media and, most importantly, Fortnite.

When we last touched on this topic, the choreographer of “Single women “ video, JaQuel Knight, had recently filed the copyright to the famous hand-flip dance. But even if other choreographers followed suit, many of them wouldn’t have the ability to enforce copyright on their dances. Enter: the TikTok strike.

Unite under the hashtag #BlackTikTokStrike, Black creators have refused to develop dances for newly released music because, they say, their hard work has too often been appropriated (especially by famous white TikTokers) without credit. A Washington post item points to two dances created by Black TikTok users which were then appropriated by TikTok star Charli D’Amelio, a 17-year-old who is not only black but also from Connecticut.

And although there is no union or formal strike, oobservers suggest the effort is already having an impact. They note that the blackout is one of the main reasons for Megan Thee Stallion’s new song, “Thot shit”, Failed to take off on TikTok.

With that in mind, I encourage creators to start protecting their dances before starting them. This is a necessary first step before legal action. Plus, I like the idea that copyright lawyers across the country have to get over their Tootsie Slides.

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