Film and photograph library – Photo Bolsillo http://photobolsillo.com/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 05:40:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://photobolsillo.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Film and photograph library – Photo Bolsillo http://photobolsillo.com/ 32 32 Thunder and Thunder Fellows Tour of the White House https://photobolsillo.com/thunder-and-thunder-fellows-tour-of-the-white-house/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 02:42:26 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/thunder-and-thunder-fellows-tour-of-the-white-house/ By Nick Gallo | Broadcast Reporter and Digital Editor | okcthunder.com Photography by Alex Dawson, Bree Maxwell and Zach Beeker Thunder Fellows visit the White House — WASHINGTON DC — Shai Gilgeous-Alexander’s tresses brushed the bottom of a decades-old chandelier. Mike Muscala slipped under a 6-foot door frame, hitting the original exterior wall of the […]]]>

By Nick Gallo | Broadcast Reporter and Digital Editor | okcthunder.com

Photography by Alex Dawson, Bree Maxwell and Zach Beeker

Thunder Fellows visit the White House

WASHINGTON DC — Shai Gilgeous-Alexander’s tresses brushed the bottom of a decades-old chandelier. Mike Muscala slipped under a 6-foot door frame, hitting the original exterior wall of the White House as he walked through an underpass. In front of the famous South Lawn, however, players crane their necks upwards to get a full glimpse of ‘the people’s house’.

Kicking off the Thunder’s trip this week to Washington, DC, the traveling group – including players and coaches – traveled to the White House on Tuesday. Nzinga Collins, 14, and Reece Robinson, 15, joined the team, two of the Thunder Fellows highlighted in “Seeds of Greenwood,” a June 2022 film produced by OKC Thunder Films that documented the first year of the team. innovative after-school program in Tulsa.

A century after the Tulsa Race massacre, the film explores how the current generation of black high school students in Tulsa are planted and nurtured in the fertile soil of historic Greenwood. The program curriculum includes data science and coding with networking opportunities in the sports and entertainment industries. The film follows the birth of Thunder Fellows and the inspiring journeys of the inaugural class students.

“They (Collins and Robinson) are great representatives and ambassadors for this program,” said Thunder head coach Mark Daigneault. “We are incredibly proud of the program and especially proud of the kids who represent it and for them to be there with us today was awesome.”

On Tuesday, Collins and Robinson took part in a partial screening of the film attended by Thunder players and White House staff. Then there were discussions about the film and a variety of political issues between players, fellows and White House staff, ranging from education to healthcare to criminal justice.

“We always talk about growing as basketball players, but the best growth in life is as a human being. Seeing these kids transform in such a short time is special,” said Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, who had a lot to learn as a Canadian national. “They have a bright future and I’m happy to be part of this program.”

“It was really cool to have our voices heard and to be able to have an open discussion about different things that we see,” added rookie guard Jalen Williams. “It was cool that they wanted to hear from us and it was cool that we got to give our opinion as well.”

Prior to the screening and discussion, the Thunder moved through the East Wing of the White House on a historic tour, passing through hallways that Presidents and first families have used since the construction of the wing in 1902. The east wing traditionally hosts social gatherings like the Easter egg roll, 4th of July festivities, state dinners, and championship celebrations.

The Thunder’s tour began at the White House Family Theater, which was converted into a dressing room in 1942. There, the team was briefed on countless features of the White House by a few Secret Service personnel who are part of the 200+ member team that services the 55,000 square foot facility. The President, First Lady and their children and grandchildren all have Secret Service details, and so does the Vice President and his family. On Tuesday, the Thunder also had their own detail.

“It’s really amazing. I never thought I would be here at the White House,” Collins said with a smile. “I would like to be president, so vote for me in 2044.”

As the Thunder awaited a ‘movement’ from First Lady Jill Biden’s Secret Service from one part of the White House to another, Thunder forward Kenrich Williams, who likes to stay out of social media and the limelight ramp, asked a very on-mark question. He was curious if there was anywhere on the grounds of the White House where presidents could have privacy. The answer: only upstairs in the upper floors of the residence.

Once given the “green light”, the contingent of more than 60 members of the Thunder organization walked through a hallway of iconic photos of former presidents and into the Vermeil room where portraits of first ladies are displayed. Then it was in the White House Library, the Roosevelt Room and the China Room – where dishes from presidents down to George Washington are displayed in display cases on the wall.

Thunder players took selfies and documented their journey through the East Wing, but nowhere were more photo ops than back outside, in front of the stately and precisely manicured South Lawn that lies pours towards the Washington Monument. Even with a regular drop of fresh rain, Thunder players made sure they had the full view and understood everything. They were truly in the most prestigious building in the country, an experience rarely granted but humbly accepted.

“We’re in the season and the games are emotional and that narrows your reach and those types of experiences broaden it,” Daigneault said. “It’s important to be able to put those life experiences into the larger context of our guys’ lives and experiences as players.”

“There are a lot of things we try to do to develop the whole player and the whole person,” said Will Dawkins, vice president of basketball operations for Thunder. “It was a great opportunity to talk about things that are important to them and important to the community and bring them to the White House and have discussions about it. It’s a good day when you talk about developing a person’s complete profile.

Back inside, Muscala ran her hands along the stone walls built in 1792 and having survived the War of 1812, a fire in 1929, and the wear and tear of old age. Most of the White House underwent a massive renovation in 1952, but in 1973 a special addition was made to the basement – a one-lane bowling alley. Thunder ninepin aficionado Tre Mann rated up to 300 he could bowl in the underground lane. His teammate Aaron Wiggins reminded him that the tight confines would be like a game on the road for him, not the familiar lanes he’s used to in Oklahoma City.

The last stop on the tour before the screening and discussion was upstairs in the Blue Room, where players peeked through incredibly thick glass to get a glimpse of the West Wing. In the East Room, players stood apart as White House staff prepared for a visit from tribal leaders from around the country for Tuesday night’s celebration of Native American Heritage Month, an event Lindy Waters III of the Thunder attended.

Before everyone left the lobby and headed back downstairs, Collins and Robinson were standing outside the Blue Room, where the presidential seal hangs just above the door. Alongside them was Thunder Fellows Executive Director Cedric Ikpo. They had to sneak together in one last selfie, under this iconic emblem, to document the gargantuan journey from the ideation of the Thunder Fellows program in the summer of 2020 to a visit to the White House just over two years and a first movie. later.

“Coming here today and being called by name by people who work so high, it was motivating to see me here one day,” Robinson said. “It was an amazing experience. I didn’t expect this movie to take me this far to see the White House.

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Former Gravesend pupil recalls filming Emma Roberts film Wild Child at Cobham Hall School which also features in The Crown https://photobolsillo.com/former-gravesend-pupil-recalls-filming-emma-roberts-film-wild-child-at-cobham-hall-school-which-also-features-in-the-crown/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/former-gravesend-pupil-recalls-filming-emma-roberts-film-wild-child-at-cobham-hall-school-which-also-features-in-the-crown/ A former student recalls the time she starred in a big girl movie when film crews took over her school in the late 2000s. Danni Fautley was attending Cobham Hall School near Gravesend when it was turned into the main venue for Wild Child along with Emma Roberts, Alex Pettyfer and the late Natasha Richardson. […]]]>

A former student recalls the time she starred in a big girl movie when film crews took over her school in the late 2000s.

Danni Fautley was attending Cobham Hall School near Gravesend when it was turned into the main venue for Wild Child along with Emma Roberts, Alex Pettyfer and the late Natasha Richardson.

The 2008 production tells the story of Poppy Moore, a rich and spoiled teenager from California who is admitted to a boarding school in England, where she soon learns the true meaning of life and friendship.

Danni, who is now a physical education teacher at the school she herself attended, recalls being only 13 when she took part in the filming, which took place during the summer holidays .

Just like at school, her mother would drop her off in the morning and pick her up in the evening once everything was done for the day.

“Filming was really fun. We had to have all the hair, makeup and uniform,” she said.

“I remember the huge marquee where we all hung out when we weren’t on set and played a lot of Uno and ate really delicious grapes – that’s all I really remember.

Danni Fautley met actor Alex Pettyfer at the premiere of Wild Child. Photo: Danni Fautley (60155272)

“As far as acting and being on set, it was just going through the scenes. I remember several of them in great detail.

“The first one I remember was when Poppy came to school. So it had to look like it had rained, because it’s ‘rainy England’ because it wasn’t a rainy day, so I thought that was really interesting.

“We saw her stop like 10 times, maybe more. She kept stopping, getting out of the car and doing this scene over and over again. I wasn’t in the camera at that time, I was wandering around a little corner somewhere.

Danni now teaches at Cobham Hall.  Photo: Danni Fautley
Danni now teaches at Cobham Hall. Photo: Danni Fautley

“I also remember seeing her coming down the stairs, when she did her whole uniform to make it a bit more jazzy. Again, going up and down the stairs for a long time while they were filming that scene.

“I remember the scene in the dining hall where she is saying her prayer, which is different from the school prayer and was actually very funny. Pretending to be a student in the dining hall when she did that.”

Cobham Hall School was the setting for Wild Child.  Photo: Douglas Wright
Cobham Hall School was the setting for Wild Child. Photo: Douglas Wright

One of Danni’s favorite parts, as any teenager would think, was meeting the cast on and off set.

She said: “Bumping into the actors in the hallways was quite fun. I loved the Head Girl, Harriet. I thought she was brilliant and really lovely in person too.

“Emma Roberts is short. So that was a bit of a shock too. You don’t always say how fat people are on camera. So when we saw her in person, she was so, so small, she was really a big surprise.

“I met Alex Pettyfer off set when I went to the film’s premiere in London. I was about 14 when I went and it was really funny because it was a huge line up. waiting to take a picture with Alex but Emma Roberts was just a bit hidden in the background and it was quite sad. No one seemed that interested in her.”

As fun as filming Wild Child was, the 27-year-old said she was “mortified” watching herself.

The Dining Room at Cobham Hall.  Photo: David Levenson
The Dining Room at Cobham Hall. Photo: David Levenson

“I was with my mom and I was mortified because it’s really awkward, but it was funny,” she said.

“Some of my co-workers recently found me in film and thought it was really funny to print out pictures of me and stick them all over the staff room. It’s a story I’m laughing at now.”

Cobham Hall has become a film set for other productions, including BBC One drama series Bleak House and Junior Bake Off, and it also features in Netflix’s latest hit series The Crown. But Wild Child was one of the few to use it as a school.

Caroline Ward Vine, admissions and marketing manager, said: “A lot of times we see Cobham Hall as a place for something and it’s transformed and it doesn’t have the same resonance. But I’ve spoken to people who were totally surprised to go to the movies and find out it was the school they knew that was there, so it created a big buzz and continues to resonate around the world.

Caroline also mentioned how the film reflected the true ethos of the school and how students around the world are drawn to Cobham Hall thanks to Wild Child.

A few movie scenes were shot on the school steps.  Photo: David Levenson
A few movie scenes were shot on the school steps. Photo: David Levenson

She said: “One of the things that I think comes through in the movie, which reflects Cobham Hall very well, is that kind of camaraderie and the togetherness and the friendships that develop in the movie, that rings true. But the rather down to earth, a kind of very caring ethic that has emerged seems very fitting and appropriate at Cobham Hall.

“However, there’s no point in watching Wild Child because many parts of the building are effectively being repurposed. For example, right now I’m sitting in what for us is the old library, but for anyone watching Wild Child would know how the principal’s office, so you see many parts of the building being used for purposes you’re not used to.

Caroline added: “In some ways, the actual type of portrayal of boarding in the film isn’t quite what it is. There’s a lot of commonality there, whereas in the real life, our daughters will be shared between only two in a room.

The old Cobham Hall library served as the office of the headmistress of Wild Child.  Photo: Cobham Hall (60155241)
The old Cobham Hall library served as the office of the headmistress of Wild Child. Photo: Cobham Hall (60155241)

“You don’t have that kind of community feeling, which is fun for the movie, but maybe not as fun for the people who would experience it.

“One of the things that is really fascinating is that the film always brings us all kinds of students from all over the world. Very recently I got a request from someone in the Far East who loves Wild Child and who loves the idea of ​​coming to school here.

“Wild Child was especially helpful in having that kind of ethos and the warmth of the film really reflect where we are.”

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Newspaper column: Half Seas Over: A blaze of Hollywood fame https://photobolsillo.com/newspaper-column-half-seas-over-a-blaze-of-hollywood-fame/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 16:51:52 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/newspaper-column-half-seas-over-a-blaze-of-hollywood-fame/ Of the thousands of ships built in Maine, most if not all have had interesting events, careers, and fates. Sadly, many have been long forgotten, except perhaps by a curious maritime historian compiling a database, or noticed as a painting hanging in a living room, a picture in a nautical book on a library shelf, […]]]>

Of the thousands of ships built in Maine, most if not all have had interesting events, careers, and fates. Sadly, many have been long forgotten, except perhaps by a curious maritime historian compiling a database, or noticed as a painting hanging in a living room, a picture in a nautical book on a library shelf, or as an entry in a dusty logbook. locked away in a museum, or seen as a trapped photo, faded behind a glass frame.

Which is a bit of a shame, if you think about it, because all of these ships represent our Maine maritime history…and each has interesting stories, facts, and memories associated with it. And it would be a tragic thing if they fell into oblivion and were forgotten.

I was fortunate to receive several Hyde Windlass Co. pamphlets of Maine-built ships from an interested reader. The Hyde Co. of Bath produced steering gear, windlasses, winches and capstans for virtually every size and class of vessel in the naval and commercial services.

Hyde Windlass was the precursor to today’s Bath Iron Works and was founded in 1895 to manufacture deck machinery. As America became more international in this age of globalization, demands for shipping increased the size and scope of the Bath Company’s operations. Recognized for their quality, they sent products all over the world.

At one point, the company issued a series of large flyers or newspaper advertisements, each highlighting a particular vessel built in Maine. Of course, they mention Hyde products, but they also include useful data such as the launch date, dimensions and tonnage of that particular vessel.

A picture or photograph of the ship is also found there, usually followed by various excerpts of historical facts and events throughout the ship’s career. These snippets are often interesting, concerning certain aspects of his life and/or his destiny.

Take, for example, the Courtney C. Houck. Built in 1913 at the GG Deering shipyard in Bath, she was nearly 219 feet long. The five-masted 1,627-ton steel schooner was launched on July 8 of the same year in the Kennebec River.

It cost $85,000 to build and sported three decks. Money has not been spared for its finish. The large aft cabin was trimmed in mahogany and ash and included a spacious master’s quarters, with a bath and pantry. Each of the five decent sized cabins had their own clothes closet.

The steel schooner is named after one of the brokerage firm MW Houck & Brothers. The namesake’s wife named the ship when it was launched in 1913, just before the outbreak of World War I.

The Courtney C. Houck spent most of her career sailing under the Deering flag, but after the war she lay dormant, barely used and left to slowly deteriorate. Like many other sailing ships at that time, her abandonment and fate seemed certain.

That is until he was discovered by an exciting new industry from California known as Hollywood. Wanting it for a silent film shoot, the producers chartered the ship in 1921 and moved it to Boston Harbor.

Author Peter B. Kyne exiting a United Air Lines flight in the 1930s. Source: Los Angeles Times https://digital.library.ucla.edu/catalog/ark:/21198/zz002cvf67

There, it would be part of a movie based on a popular Cappy Ricks book series by author Peter Bernhard Kyne. A prolific American novelist, Kyne published dozens of books and short stories between 1904 and 1940. He was born and died in San Francisco.

Many of his works were adapted into screenplays during Hollywood’s early years, and over 100 films were made from his books between 1914 and 1952, including the Kyne-created character Cappy Ricks.

In 1921, Hollywood wanted to film this popular character and this book series. Veteran actor Thomas Meighan has been cast as Ricks, a soft-spoken, crispy Scottish captain aboard his schooner Retriever. The ship’s stage name even meant that the Courtney C. Houckthe ship’s name had to be temporarily changed on the official ship’s register.

One of the film’s highlights included a big fight scene aboard a ship between Ricks and a giant sailor named Ole Peterson. The tall sailor was played by Ivan Linow, a Latvian-American wrestler, whose good looks and size helped him become a character actor in American films of this era.

Actor Thomas Meighan, left, as Cappy Ricks in a still from the 1921 American film Cappy Ricks, the fight scene aboard the Courtney C. Houck, the ship’s stage name Retriever. Michael A. Dean. Public domain image

Hyde’s publicity leaflet contains a sketch of the scene as it was filmed aboard the schooner. It must have been quite a show. An image also survived from the film showing Cappy Ricks with his fists raised.

Unfortunately, it’s unknown if a complete copy of this Cappy Ricks movie still exists. The Library of Congress Database of American Silent Films reports that the UCLA Film and Television Archives lists a preserved but incomplete copy of the film.

After the schooner’s brush with Hollywood fame, the ship fell into disuse and disrepair. At some point, probably around 1930, she was towed to Mill Cove in Boothbay Harbor and virtually abandoned.

Courtney C. Houck in her final resting place on the mudflats of Boothbay at Mill Cove, stripped but not emptied. Andrew Toppan, Haze Gray & Underway at https://www.hazegray.org/about.htm

Boothbay’s Mill Cove became a popular dumping ground for large, obsolete schooners during the Great Depression. At least five of them, possibly more, sat in the mud. Some were eventually stripped and emptied, others were removed for use as barges, and some were left to rot, including the Courtney C. Houck.

Zebedee E. Cliff, left, Courtney C. Houck and Edna M. McKnight at Mill Cove in the late 1930s. Andrew Toppan, Haze Gray & Underway at https://www.hazegray.org/about.htm

Finally, his remains were sold for scrap in 1937. The price was $255. Stripped to where it lay, the remaining hulk was left to rot alongside fellow schooner Edna M. McKnight. In 1945, to celebrate the victory of the United States over Japan in World War II, the two former schooners were burnt down.

One hull burned to the waterline; the other remained partially intact. Locals speak of three ships being burnt that night, but nothing has been confirmed about this. If you look closely today you can still see some of the remains of these ships, although which is which is not entirely clear.

Either way, the Maine-built schooner Courtney C. Houck ended his life in a burst of glory. Come to think of it, much like a lot of Hollywood stars.

Charles H. Lagerbom teaches AP US history at Belfast Area High School and lives in Northport. He can be contacted at clagerbom@rsu71.org. He is the author of “Whaling in Maine”, available on Historypress.com.

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20+ Louisville Shows and Concerts to See in November 2022 https://photobolsillo.com/20-louisville-shows-and-concerts-to-see-in-november-2022/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 09:08:41 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/20-louisville-shows-and-concerts-to-see-in-november-2022/ This arts and entertainment calendar is updated weekly and lists events happening in and around Louisville, from concerts and comedy shows, to theater productions, musicals, and more. SATURDAY NOV. 5 Welshly Arms, Motherfolk, Goldpark. 8 p.m., Headliners Music Hall, 1386 Lexington Road. Tickets are $20. headlinerslouisville.com. Corey Smith. 7 p.m., The Jefferson, 715 W. Riverside […]]]>

This arts and entertainment calendar is updated weekly and lists events happening in and around Louisville, from concerts and comedy shows, to theater productions, musicals, and more.

SATURDAY NOV. 5

Welshly Arms, Motherfolk, Goldpark. 8 p.m., Headliners Music Hall, 1386 Lexington Road. Tickets are $20. headlinerslouisville.com.

Corey Smith. 7 p.m., The Jefferson, 715 W. Riverside Dr. Jeffersonville, Indiana. Tickets start at $25. thejeffersonvenue.com.

Louisville Ballet. “Celebrating Alum.” Celebrate the life and artistry of the late Alun Jones who led Louisville Ballet as Artistic Director for nearly a quarter of a century. 8 p.m., Whitney Hall, Kentucky Center, 501 W. Main St. Contains adult language and themes. Tickets start at $39. kentuckyperformingarts.org; louisvilleballet.org.

“Don’t let the pigeon drive the bus.” Derby Dinner Playhouse Children’s Theater presents the show based on the award-winning children’s book, this new musical feature a mix of delightful songs. The Show Room, 525 Marriott Drive, Clarksville. Breakfast, 9:00 a.m.; show 10 a.m. Dinner, noon, show 1:15 p.m. Ends Nov. 12 Breakfast $17; lunch $22. 812-288-8281. derbydinner.com.

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Electrophonic Ensemble Features Experimental Musicians – The Oberlin Review https://photobolsillo.com/electrophonic-ensemble-features-experimental-musicians-the-oberlin-review/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 21:03:31 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/electrophonic-ensemble-features-experimental-musicians-the-oberlin-review/ Behind the scenes of the electrophonic show, the students work the magic. On Tuesday, October 25, the Electrophonics ensemble from the TIMARA department gave their first concert at Cat in the Cream. Electrophonics is an electronic ensemble that combines visual arts, experimental music and live performance. The show consisted of eight fixed stereo audio tracks, […]]]>

On Tuesday, October 25, the Electrophonics ensemble from the TIMARA department gave their first concert at Cat in the Cream. Electrophonics is an electronic ensemble that combines visual arts, experimental music and live performance.

The show consisted of eight fixed stereo audio tracks, which ranged from ambient noise to sample-based hyperpop to synthesized singer-songwriter compositions. The works featured in this show were all pre-recorded and the artists went behind the sound booth to manage the audio output as their music played at the Cat in the Cream. Two performers, Oliver Harlan in the first year of the double degree and Orson Abram in the third year of the double degree, concluded the ensemble performance with their individual audiovisual experiences, in which their visual art merged with experimental sound design.

The TIMARA department, a staple of Oberlin, attracts experimental musicians from around the world to study within the experience and resources of an established electronic arts program. Students are able to learn and practice with different musical instruments and technologies.

Artists who have shared their work at Electrophonics have worked with a wide range of electronic tools, from TIMARA synthesizers to software like Ableton, Logic and Bitwig.

Harlan created a sample-based audio-visual experience named “Ephemeral” using recordings from NASA’s Sample Library. The raw audio files recorded by the Perseverance Mars Rover were accompanied by video art created by Harlan.

“I used visuals because, if I’m doing something for a concert to show people, I just want it to be the most engaging experience possible,” Harlan said. “The content was mostly recorded on my phone. I approach the visuals in a way similar to how I sample, edit and manipulate music, but with footage. I also used the DALL generator- E AI. I uploaded a picture I took, then I created AI variations of it, then I took one of those pictures and I made AI variations of it , and I kept doing it over and over. It all started as the image of a museum in [Los Angeles]and the final image was just a square.

Sometimes there is a hierarchical relationship between music and visuals, with one supporting the other. It moves in different contexts, from film to music video. Musicians can set scores for films, in which video is prominently featured, and some visual artists work on designing music videos, which revolve around music. However, engaging with experimental sounds and visuals could allow for even more collaboration between mediums.

“By engaging with multiple mediums, you can create something that might not otherwise make sense,” Harlan said. “Audio or visuals alone might not make sense, but together as one piece they do. I was a little worried that the video wouldn’t take anything away from the audio, people focus more on the visuals I’ve done a bit of film music and it’s fun but for that the music isn’t the main focus so people don’t really lend to it attention. It’s interesting to do it the other way around, with the music as the focal point. I think doing visuals to accompany the music can enhance it.

The audience consisted not only of other musicians and electronic experimenters, but also of other students who are interested in experimental electronic music.

“I have two friends who had plays that were performed at the show, so I went partly for them and partly because I love everything that happens in the TIMARA department,” said Danilo Vujacic, first year in college. “I’m really interested in the music they perform and curious to explore the classes in the department soon. I love noise music, I find it fascinating, and being in a place like Oberlin, there are a lot of great opportunities and people to meet who are interested in that kind of stuff.

For audience members, the multidisciplinary experimentation was effective in connecting with the soundscapes.

“There is certainly an interesting relationship between experimental noise music and its translation into film,” Vujacic said. “We saw it with some of the pieces from the concert. The visuals enhance the experience and elevate the atmosphere created by the music. I think this interaction is interesting and valuable. It adds another dimension to the music.

Other audience members included visual artists, some of whom had not encountered electronic music before coming to Oberlin.

“I think it’s so cool to do art in a place where there are so many different people doing so many different things, because you naturally combine different ideas and mediums,” said Frances McFetridge, first year in college and a visual artist. “This performance was a great example of that – of the fusion of technology, art, visuals and music. It felt like an expansion of the artistic spirit into other mediums that made it more interesting and nuanced.

Presentations like the Electrophonics Concert allow TIMARA students, electronic musicians, and visual artists to connect with a diverse audience to connect through technology and multidisciplinary arts.

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Oak Lawn Public Library announces events in early November – The Southland Journal https://photobolsillo.com/oak-lawn-public-library-announces-events-in-early-november-the-southland-journal/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 05:04:35 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/oak-lawn-public-library-announces-events-in-early-november-the-southland-journal/ Oak Lawn Public Library announces events in early November (Oak Lawn, Ill.) – The oak lawn The Public Library is pleased to announce upcoming events taking place November 1-15, 2022. Please note that all programs are listed in the library’s quarterly newsletter which has been sent to all Oak Lawn homes. Events English together (ESL): […]]]>

Oak Lawn Public Library announces events in early November (Oak Lawn, Ill.) – The oak lawn The Public Library is pleased to announce upcoming events taking place November 1-15, 2022. Please note that all programs are listed in the library’s quarterly newsletter which has been sent to all Oak Lawn homes.

Events

  • English together (ESL): Join librarian and teacher Kate for a weekly beginner to intermediate ESL class on Thursdays from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. in the Teen Room on the second floor of the library.
  • Storytimes for young people: Stories, songs and movement support early literacy development and learning. We will be hosting Lapsit (6-24 months), Toddler (2-3 years), Preschool (3-5 years) and Kindergarten Readiness (4-5 years) story times each week throughout the month. Visit our calendar at cal.olpl.org for the exact dates and times of each story hour. All admission tickets for the story hours will be distributed 30 minutes before the program at the youth services counter.
  • Workshops for beginners on the app: Are you new to OLPL’s free apps? Bring your smart device to these half-hour workshops and a librarian will walk you through all the steps to mastering each app. The workshops will take place on Mondays at 7 p.m., Tuesdays at 3 p.m. and Wednesdays at 11 a.m. until November 30. You will need an email address and an OLPL library card to get started.
  • Story Explorers (5-8 years): Let’s learn and laugh together with a mix of stories, games and fun on Tuesdays, November 1 and 15, from 4 to 4:30 p.m. Admission tickets will be distributed 30 minutes before the program at the Youth Services counter.
  • Mix essential oils for your health – A course to make and take away: Join us on Tuesday, November 1 at 6:30 p.m. as Brittany Hogan shows you how to create essential oil blends that support your body’s natural well-being. You will walk away with a free custom oil blend that you created. Register at cal.olpl.org as places are limited.

More events

  • Imagine this! (9-12 years old): Join us Wednesday, November 2 and 9 from 4-4:45 p.m. as we use picture books to discover amazing facts, try new things, get moving, and laugh! Entrance tickets will be distributed 30 minutes before the program at the youth services counter.
  • Virtual Chair Yoga and Meditation: Join Instructor Isabel Raci, C-IAYT, online for a gentle session of guided meditation and chair yoga on Wednesday, November 2 at 6 p.m. Sign up at cal.olpl.org for the program link.
  • Dinonovembre family celebration: Calling all dinosaur fans! Celebrate your favorites at our Dinovember party on Sunday, November 6 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Activities include dinosaur print t-shirt stamping (please bring your own item to stamp), stop-motion dinosaur movies, games and crafts. Activities will take approximately 20 minutes, while supplies last.
  • Create your own cookbook with Canva: Collect your treasured recipes in an engaging digital cookbook using Canva on Monday, November 7 at 6 p.m. or Thursday, November 10 at 2 p.m. Register for a session at cal.olpl.org.
  • Crafting Creativebug: Join us on Monday, November 7 at 7 p.m. to draw and paint a mixed media silhouette from a photo of a loved one (even a favorite pet!) and bring it home , ready to be framed. Register at cal.olpl.org.
  • The Yarnery Club: Bring your craft projects to the library on Tuesday, November 8 at 2 p.m. and spend an hour chatting while your needles do the work.
  • The elephant and the pig draw a pigeon (5-8 years): Help us celebrate Children’s Book Week by learning to draw your favorite Mo Willems characters on Tuesday, November 8 from 4-4:30 p.m. Admission tickets will be distributed 30 minutes before the program at the Youth Services counter .

More events

  • OLPL Film Club: We will be discussing the film “Jurassic Park” (1993) on Tuesday, November 8 at 7 p.m. in the Mary Nelson Room on the lower level of the library.
  • Screening of films with friends: The Friends of the Library will screen the film “Midway” (2019) on Wednesday, November 9 at 1:30 p.m. in the lower level meeting rooms of the Library. The film tells the harrowing story of the Battle of the Pacific Ocean on Midway Atoll that became a watershed moment in World War II. PG-13. 138 minutes.
  • Graphically Speaking Book Discussion: Join us on Wednesday, November 9 at 7 p.m. at Book Club Nook on the second floor to discuss Jim Terry’s “Come Home, Indio.”
  • Tails and Tales – Dinosaurs: Enjoy entertaining dinosaur stories that will have you roaring on Sunday, November 13 from 11 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
  • Table game craftsmen – Design, create and play your own games: This two-session workshop will cover basic tabletop game functionality. We’ll brainstorm concepts, then set you free with our amazing crafting supplies on Monday, November 14 at 6:30 p.m. Then join us on Monday, November 21 at 6:30 p.m. for a fun night of playtesting. Seating is limited, please register at cal.olpl.org.
  • Breast cancer – Is it in our genes? : Join Jessica Dowling, Cristina Ruiz and Deb Oleskowicz on Monday, November 14 at 6:30 p.m. in the first floor cafe to talk about breast cancer and its relationship to our genes. This program is in partnership with Advocate Aurora Health.

For more information, please call 708-422-4990, visit www.olpl.org, or use the LibChat feature on our website.

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Oak Lawn Public Library announces events in early November

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BYRON ALLEN’S ALLEN MEDIA GROUP ANNOUNCES INITIAL ‘THE GRIO AWARDS’ CELEBRATING ICONS, LEADERS AND LEGENDS https://photobolsillo.com/byron-allens-allen-media-group-announces-initial-the-grio-awards-celebrating-icons-leaders-and-legends/ Mon, 17 Oct 2022 17:03:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/byron-allens-allen-media-group-announces-initial-the-grio-awards-celebrating-icons-leaders-and-legends/ Winners include: Tyler Perry, Norman Lear, Patti LaBelle, Kenan Thompson, Ben CrumpAlena Analeigh McQuarter, Robert F. Smith, Allyson Felix, Don Peebles, Queen Latifah, Dave Chappelleand Jennifer Hudson LOS ANGELES, October 17, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Allen Media GroupThe African American news, lifestyle, sports and entertainment platform from leGrio (www.thegrio.com) will celebrate icons, leaders and legends at […]]]>

Winners include: Tyler Perry, Norman Lear, Patti LaBelle, Kenan Thompson, Ben CrumpAlena Analeigh McQuarter, Robert F. Smith, Allyson Felix, Don Peebles, Queen Latifah, Dave Chappelleand Jennifer Hudson

LOS ANGELES, October 17, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Allen Media GroupThe African American news, lifestyle, sports and entertainment platform from leGrio (www.thegrio.com) will celebrate icons, leaders and legends at The Grio Awardsa star-studded black-tie event at beverly hilton on Saturday October 222022 with the co-host comedian Sheryl Underwood and Taye Digg. The televised event will be broadcast on Saturday, November 5, 2022 on television channels broadcast throughout the country, the Grio television network and other Allen Media Group television and digital platforms.

Presenting in person, this year’s winners include: Tyler Perry (Grio ICON Award, @tylerperry), Norman Lear (Grio Champion Award, @TheNormanLear), Patti LaBelle (leGrio Music Icon Award, @mspattipatti), Kenan Thompson (leGrio Comedy Icon Award, @kenanthompson), Ben Crump (Grio Justice Icon Award, @AttorneyCrump), Alena Analeigh McQuarter (theGrio Young Icon Award, @thebrownstemgirl), Robert F. Smith (Grio Philanthropy Prize, @RFS_Vista), Allyson Felix (leGrio Sports Icon Award, @allysonfelix), Don Peebles (leGrio Business Icon Award, Queen Latifah (Grio TV Icon Award, @iamqueenlatifah), Dave Chappelle (theGrio Cultural Icon Award, @davechappelle), and Jennifer Hudson (Grio Trailblazer Icon Award, @IAMJHUD). The event will also include special musical performances by Yolande Adams, Tyrese, Fancy and Patti LaBelle. Greg Phillinganes provide musical direction, and Kiss DJ will serve as both DJ and announcer.

“I created the Grio Awards to celebrate and amplify African American excellence and the incredible champions from other communities who truly support us,” said Byron Allen, Founder/Chairman/CEO of Allen Media Group. “Child, strong and positive African-American icons such as Berry Gordy, Jr., Rosa Parks, Mohamed Aliand Martin Luther King jr. helped me see myself differently and changed the trajectory of my life. Celebrating and amplifying iconic individuals is something we can never do enough of, especially for our children.”

The Grio Awards celebrates excellence in film, music, comedy, television, sports, philanthropy, business, fashion, social justice, environmental justice, education and cultural icons and innovators, whose many contributions are positively impacting America. The Grio Awards honors and amplifies the story makers, change makers and artists who define and influence our world. Allen Media Group and Backhand productions co-produce the Grio Awards. Executive producers include: Byron Allen, People of Carolyn, Jennifer Lucas, Jeff Atlasand Michael Willrich.

About Allen Media Group
President and CEO Byron Allen based Allen Media Group/Entertainment Studios in 1993. Based in Los Angelesit has offices at New York, Chicago, Atlantaand Charleston, South Carolina. Allen Media Group has 27 ABC-NBC-CBS-FOX affiliate television stations in 21 U.S. markets and twelve 24-hour HD television networks serving nearly 220 million subscribers: THE WEATHER CHANNEL, THE WEATHER CHANNEL EN ESPAÑOL, PETS.TV, COMEDY.TV, RECIPE.TV, CARS.TV, ES.TV, MYDESTINATION.TV, JUSTICE CENTRAL.TV, THEGRIO, THIS TELEVISIONand PATTERN. Allen Media Group also owns the streaming platforms HBCU GO, SPORTS.TV, THEGRIO, THE WEATHER CHANNEL STREAMING APP and LOCAL NOW–the free streaming AVOD service powered by THE WEATHER CHANNEL and its content partners, which provides real-time, hyper-local weather, traffic, sports and lifestyle information. Allen Media Group also produces, distributes and sells advertising for 68 television programs, making it one of the largest independent producers/distributors of first-run syndicated television programming for television stations. Allen Media Group International Television continues to expand its branding and content around the world. It currently has active license agreements and programming in South AfricaThe United Arab Emirates, AustraliaThe Bahamian, Canada and New Zealand. With a library of over 5,000 hours of content held across multiple genres, Allen Media Group delivers video content to television stations, cable television networks, mobile devices and digital media. Our mission is to provide great programming to our Fortune 500 viewers, online users and advertising partners.

Entertainment Studios Motion Pictures is a full-service motion picture distribution company specializing in wide-release commercial content. ESMP released the highest-grossing independent film of 2017, the shark thriller 47 METERS DOWNwhich brought in more than $44.3 million. In 2018, ESMP also released Western to commercial and critical acclaim. HOSTILEShistorical mystery thriller CHAPPAQUIDDICK and the sequel to 47 METERS DOWN, 47 METERS BELOW: NO CAGE. The digital distribution unit of Entertainment Studios Motion Pictures, Freestyle Digital Media, is a leading multi-platform distributor with direct partnerships across all major cable, digital and streaming platforms. Capitalizing on a robust infrastructure, proven track record and experienced sales team, Freestyle Digital Media is a veritable home for independent films.

In 2016, Allen Media Group bought The Grioa highly rated digital video-centric news community platform dedicated to providing African Americans with compelling stories and perspectives currently underrepresented in existing national media. The Grio offers aggregated and original video packages, news articles and opinion pieces on topics including breaking news, politics, health, business and entertainment. Initially launched in 2009, the platform was later acquired by BNC News in 2010. The digital platform remains focused on curating exciting digital content and currently has over 100 million annual visitors

About Backhand Productions
Jeff Atlas based Backhand productions with a contract to produce 14 hours of live TV content for the Democratic National Convention. Of the, Reverse went on to produce a series of diverse and high quality productions for ABC, NBC, FOX, DTT, Nickelodeon, MTV, and more. Notable projects include by Kevin Hart theatrical Blockbuster, Laugh at my painthe launch of LA YouTube spaceand the National Urban LeagueNational Annual Conference and NAACP Picture Award. His virtual event credits include the Gracie Awards, the 2016 and 2020 Democratic National Conventions, and the go90s live broadcast of the Out of Land Music Festival in San Francisco. Additionally, he co-created and produced the limited series blood ivory for animal planetwhich focuses on the non-profit group of American veterans (VETPAW) and their first mission to Tanzania to support the fight against elephant poaching. The most recent projects include the Biden Inaugural in 2021, the NBA All-Star Gameand project launches for instagram and Facebook. Reverse is represented by Robyn Lattaker Johnson at A3 Artist Agency and Kerry Smith of Smith Entertainment Legal Group.

SOURCEAllen Media Group

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Silent Movie Ads Capture Early American Movies https://photobolsillo.com/silent-movie-ads-capture-early-american-movies/ Fri, 14 Oct 2022 21:59:51 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/silent-movie-ads-capture-early-american-movies/ Silent films established the American film industry. But many of those films from the early 1900s no longer exist. A new project aims to capture flavor of these films by digitizing old advertisements and posting the material online. The idea for the project came from Chicago-based collector Dwight Cleveland. He is cooperating in this effort […]]]>

Silent films established the American film industry. But many of those films from the early 1900s no longer exist.

A new project aims to capture flavor of these films by digitizing old advertisements and posting the material online.

The idea for the project came from Chicago-based collector Dwight Cleveland. He is cooperating in this effort with a professor and students from Dartmouth College in New Hampshire.

Cleveland is a real estate developer who became interested in silent film advertisements, also called maps, as a high school student in the 1970s. He was introduced to real maps by his art teacher at the time. , who had a small collection.

A cinema lobby card promotes the 1919 silent film ‘Strictly Confidential’. (Photo courtesy of Dwight Cleveland via AP)

Cleveland recently told The Associated Press that he “fell in love” with the colors, chart and other elements used in movie maps. The first experience made him want to start his own collection. “He just yelled, ‘Take me home! ‘” Cleveland said.

The cards were designed to be placed inside the area outside the theater entrances, also known as lobbies. The cards informed viewers of movies currently playing as well as movies that would arrive next. They showcased everything Hollywood had to offer, including comedies, romances, and action movies.

Cleveland told the AP that about 90% of all silent movies have been lost. One of the main reasons for this is that the chemicals used to make many of the early films have broken down over time. Many silent films were also destroyed in fires.

A cinema lobby card promotes the 1923 silent film "The Secret of the Pueblo." (Photo courtesy of Dwight Cleveland via AP)

A movie theater lobby card promotes the 1923 silent film ‘The Secret of the Pueblo’. (Photo courtesy of Dwight Cleveland via AP)

“What this means is that these lobby cards are the only tangible example that these movies even existed,” Cleveland said.

Cards, traditionally measuring 28 by 35 centimeters, were placed in sets of eight or more. They showed a movie’s name, production company, actors, and more. The cards were intended to give moviegoers a Insight movies. Today, they capture the stars and storytelling methods that existed during the period or era of American silent cinema.

Back then, movie trailers – the brief video introductions to upcoming movies that we still see in theaters today – weren’t common.

Dwight Cleveland, an avid collector of movie posters and lobby cards, poses for a portrait with his first lobby card he collected for the 1929 film Western Wolf Song. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

Dwight Cleveland, an avid collector of movie posters and lobby cards, poses for a portrait with his first lobby card he collected for the 1929 film Western Wolf Song. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

Early lobby cards were produced using a process that primarily used black, white, and brown designs. Other colors were often added later by hand, writes Josie Walters-Johnston. She is a librarian at the Moving Image Research Center of the US Library of Congress.

By the 1920s, images began to look more like pictures and included more intricate design details. The cards were placed in theaters for many years, but production halted in the late 1970s or early 1980s, Walters-Johnston wrote.

Cleveland sent examples from his personal collection to the Media Ecology Project in Dartmouth. The effort is led by Mark Williams, associate professor of film and media studies. He oversees a small group of students who remove each card from its protective envelope to to analyse and digitize.

When complete, the Lobby Card Collection will become part of Dartmouth’s Early Cinema Compendium. This is an extensive collection of rare and valuable items relating to old and mostly lost American films. The collection will be published online with financial assistance from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

A cinema lobby card promotes the 1923 silent film "Turn signal." (Photo courtesy of Dwight Cleveland via AP)

A cinema admission pass promotes the 1923 silent film ‘Blinky’. (Photo courtesy of Dwight Cleveland via AP)

Williams said the main goal of the project is to make the material available to early movie fans and scholars look alike. He added that he hopes the publication of the collection “catapult new interest” in the silent film era.

I am Brian Lynn.

The Associated Press reported this story. Bryan Lynn adapted the report for VOA Learning English.

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words in this story

flavor -not. the quality of something, usually related to taste

chart nm or related to the pictorial arts

tangible adj. something real that can be seen, touched, measured, etc.

Insight nm a short film that advertises a movie or TV show

to analyse -v. use a machine to read or copy something into a computer

learned nm someone who has studied a subject and knows a lot about it

catapult v. to move something in the air quickly and with great force

_______________________________________________________________________

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How the Gilded Age Created American Jewry https://photobolsillo.com/how-the-gilded-age-created-american-jewry/ Wed, 12 Oct 2022 21:46:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/how-the-gilded-age-created-american-jewry/ Mike Hale ruined “The Gilded Age” for me. After reading his New York Times article on the HBO series about old New York — he called it “a confusing, sloppy portrayal…that constantly descends into caricature” — I thought there was a lot of other series that were worth my time and attention. However, he didn’t […]]]>

Mike Hale ruined “The Gilded Age” for me.

After reading his New York Times article on the HBO series about old New York — he called it “a confusing, sloppy portrayal…that constantly descends into caricature” — I thought there was a lot of other series that were worth my time and attention.

However, he didn’t ruin for me the Golden Age, that is, the actual historical period, roughly from the end of the Civil War to the end of the 19th century. Like many others, I am fascinated by the hallmarks of overage: the lavish homes of robber barons, the mind-numbing cultural codes of Four Hundred high society, the literary treatments of Edith Wharton, Henry James and Booth Tarkington.

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I am also appalled by the squalor of the time: the abject inner-city poverty captured in the photographs of Jacob Riis, for example, and the racist terrorism and white supremacist laws that ended Reconstruction. As historians Adam Mendelsohn and Jonathan Sarna describe the time, it was a “dizzying era marked by freedom and disenfranchisement, excess and impoverishment, opportunity and exclusion, trust and ‘anxiety”.

What I rarely thought about was the place of the Jews in this picture. I have known figures like August Belmont and the Lehman Brothers, who amassed great fortunes but were branded as upstarts by the WASP elite. I knew that Jewish immigrants from Romania and the Russian Empire had started pouring into New York in the 1880s, but I always felt that their history belonged to the 20th century (when, not so coincidentally, my own great -parents have arrived). When I read a Wharton novel, my encounters with Jews were both rare and unfortunate.

Mendelsohn and Sarna set out to restore the place of the Jews in the post-Civil War period. They edited the massive forthcoming anthology, “Yearning to Breathe Free: Jews in the Gilded Age” (Princeton University Library). The title is taken, of course, from the poem inscribed at the base of the Statue of Liberty and written by Jewish poet Emma Lazarus, as fascinating a Golden Age figure as there ever was.

Earlier this month, the American Jewish Historical Society in Manhattan held a day-long conference, “Jews in the Gilded Age,” with panels featuring many authors who contributed to the new book. It was a bit like Comic Con for history nerds, or at least buffs like me, who regularly listen to New York history podcasts such as “The Bowery Boys” and its spin-off, “The Gilded Gentleman” by Carl Raymond. Like the book, the symposium fleshed out a complicated time, including describing the seeds it sowed for American Jewry as we know it today.

A big seed was the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, founded in 1886. Before becoming the flagship of Conservative Judaism, the JTS was the attempt by traditionalists to thwart the rise of liberal and intimidating Reform Judaism. Only later did it emerge as American Judaism’s third way between Reform and Orthodoxy, as Sarna explained during a panel that included Rabbi Meir Soloveitchik of Congregation Shearith Israel of New York and current JTS Chancellor Shuly Rubin Schwartz.

The huge economic expansion of the time created enormous opportunities for Jews. Mendelsohn and another panelist, Roger Horowitz of the Hagley Museum and Library, described the conditions that allowed even poor immigrants to get a boost, from the booming market for ready-to-wear and cheap consumer goods to news industries like vaudeville, sheet music, and movies.

And as these “alrightniks” moved into the ruling class, Jewish workers began to organize in a way that anticipated the labor movement – ​​and liberal voting patterns – of the 20th century. The new wealth also freed Jewish women from housework; historians Pamela Nadell and Esther Shor have explained how Lazarus and essayist Nina Morais Cohen used this freedom to defend their fellow Jews against emerging anti-Semitism.

This anti-Semitism was the inevitable backlash of Jewish success. Jeffrey Gurock of Yeshiva University spoke of the founding of the American Jewish Historical Society itself, saying that one of its main functions was apologetics – that is, chronicling and sometimes the exaggeration of Jewish contributions to the founding of the United States in order to counter growing anti-Semitism and anti-immigrant nativism. You recognize today that uncertain impulse whenever a Jewish friend forwards a list of Jewish Nobel laureates or the latest evidence that Christopher Columbus was Jewish.

During a session on portrayals of the Gilded Age in film and TV, Hale reiterated his criticism of the HBO series, but also noted how the show’s Jews are “present by their absence “. The character George Russell is not identified as Jewish, but, as Hale and co-panellist Miriam Mora agreed, he is coded Jewish by his attempt to intrude into old New York society and the attempts of WASP characters to keep him away. He is also one of the few characters on the show played by a Jewish actor, Morgan Spector (who also starred in HBO’s “The Plot Against America”).

For Mora, the program director at the Center for Jewish History, Joan Micklin Silver’s 1975 film “Hester Street” was a more honest portrayal of the Gilded Age. Set on the Lower East Side in 1896, the independent film dared to portray “Americanization as a negative,” she said. Its protagonists are a Jewish husband who strives to hate the Old Country and a wife who tries to hold on to its traditions. No sweet Hollywood depictions of the Golden Age — like “Meet Me in St. Louis” or “Hello Dolly!” — would have dared to recognize these costs.

For many Jews today, the Golden Age looks like a grainy black-and-white photograph, but instead of a lavish black-tie dinner at Delmonico, it shows an ancestor standing in front of a store window. advertising “complete grocery stores” and “jobbers”. of dry products.

Learning about the Jewish Golden Age is like watching this photograph develop in a darkroom.

On the one hand, the image reveals the anxieties that still haunt us: anti-Semitism, internal divisions, the high price of assimilation.

It is also a portrait of success. As Benjamin Steiner writes in “Yearing to Breathe Free”, “Hard work, traditions of mutual aid, respect for education, centuries of diaspora experience, structural economic forces linked to capitalism and the fact that most Jews were white-skinned in a society where blacks were the primary outgroup – all of which enabled Jews in the mid-twentieth century to become one of the most prosperous minority groups in America.Jewish Telegraphic Agency

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‘It only brings us together’: the challenge as deadly strikes bring war back to Kyiv | Ukraine https://photobolsillo.com/it-only-brings-us-together-the-challenge-as-deadly-strikes-bring-war-back-to-kyiv-ukraine/ Mon, 10 Oct 2022 19:46:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/it-only-brings-us-together-the-challenge-as-deadly-strikes-bring-war-back-to-kyiv-ukraine/ SHevchenko Park in central Kyiv is a tranquil public garden, where the trees turn golden against the city’s blue, autumnal sky. Presiding over the park is a statue of Taras Shevchenko, the national poet of Ukraine, persecuted by Russians in the 19th century for writing in Ukrainian. But on Monday, that sense of calm was […]]]>

SHevchenko Park in central Kyiv is a tranquil public garden, where the trees turn golden against the city’s blue, autumnal sky. Presiding over the park is a statue of Taras Shevchenko, the national poet of Ukraine, persecuted by Russians in the 19th century for writing in Ukrainian.

But on Monday, that sense of calm was violently shattered when a series of missiles hit the city center. The war had returned to what had been, for several months, a mostly peaceful – if anxious – town.

It was around 8.15 a.m. local time (06.15 a.m. BST) during rush hour when a major road junction next to the park, near the Taras Shevchenko National University science library, was hit. . The rocket blast destroyed three cars, killing several occupants. Footage from the immediate aftermath showed vehicles on fire and rescue workers tending to the injured.

A shell crater in central Kyiv as the cleanup of missile strikes begins. Photography: Ruslan Kaniuka/Ukrinform/NurPhoto/Rex/Shutterstock

Another missile struck the children’s playground in Shevchenko Park itself, destroying cobblestones, twisting play equipment and snapping a nearby tree. Other missiles fell near the main station, near the Troieshchyna power station on the left bank of the Dnieper and on a footbridge over the river.

Novelist Victoria Amelina, who since the start of the 2022 Russian invasion has also been a war crimes researcher, was in the city center when the missiles hit, having just arrived on the Lviv-Kyiv sleeper train.

While waiting for a taxi, she heard the sound of at least two explosions. As she took a taxi home, she saw “dark clouds and debris” near what is informally known as the Klitschko Bridge, after the mayor of Kyiv. The glass-bottomed pedestrian and bicycle bridge, spanning the Dnieper, opened in 2019 and is often busy with walkers and tourists.

Map of Kyiv missile strikes

“It’s not a strategic goal,” she said. “If they hit this bridge, it’s a strange revenge for the Crimean Bridge – it’s a bridge where tourists walk.”

Her route then took her past the Shevchenko Park junction, which had been hit minutes earlier. “It looked like they were either trying to hit the university or the statue of Taras Shevchenko,” she said. “Unfortunately, they hit cars: I saw the fires and the cars on fire.”

She then passed to the other side of the park, and stopped her taxi to be able to film the scene. “I saw a big hole and flames inside, right next to the children’s play area,” she said.

“It really is the center of our capital and it’s the park that I love,” she added. “That’s why I moved to Kyiv – it’s so dynamic.”

Ukrainian towns bombed in response to Crimean bridge explosion – video report

The playground attack, Amelina said, was adjacent to the Khanenko Museum, which contains paintings by Boucher, Rubens and Bellini, and ancient Iranian and Chinese artifacts.

But it’s also seconds from a children’s hospital.

Dmytro Olyzko and his eight-year-old daughter, Kamila, were visiting No. 6 Children’s Clinical Hospital when the missiles struck.

“Parents told me that all the children in the hospital come here to play,” he said. “If this had happened two hours later, the playground would have been full of children.”

A few kilometers away, Iryna Gorlach, who works for an NGO in the education sector, was awakened by another explosion near the station, not far from her apartment. By mid-morning, she was settled in her bathroom – the safest part of her apartment – drinking coffee and trying to get some work done, having decided not to attempt to reach the safe haven the next day. closer, the local metro station.

“In a way, it’s the same on February 24,” she said, referring to the first day of the war, when rockets also hit Kyiv. “And yet it’s not the first time for us, so it’s not quite the same.”

Doctors help a victim of the bombing near Kyiv's central station
Doctors come to the aid of a victim of the bombardment near Kyiv’s central station. Photography: Oleksandr Khomenko/NurPhoto/Rex/Shutterstock

Also within earshot of the explosions near the station, which hit a business center, was Maria Glazunova, who works at the Dovzhenko Center film archive. She had, she said, had a “pretty normal” summer with “movie premieres, concerts, etc.” — even though the city’s curfew “had made us teenagers again — we were coming home around 11 p.m.”

By mid-morning Monday, however, she was busy recharging all her devices and power banks and refilling water bottles, just in case. “We are really angry because Shevchenko University now has broken windows, same for the museum. Between them, the children’s playground is destroyed – the place where my friends played when they were children. It’s pretty bad. But we just feel angry. Because it doesn’t make sense. Still, friends joke about the Kyiv Bridge – it seems to be more stable than the Crimean Bridge.

She had planned a series of short film premieres, which were to take place the following day. “If necessary,” she said, “we’ll just move them to a partner cinema that has an underground room. The show must continue.”

As extraordinary as the evidence of destruction was, how quickly Kyiv returned to normal life after the attack. At lunchtime, and less than 200 yards from the University Strike, a boy was doing tricks on his skateboard on the base of a sandbag statue outside the opera house. Shops and restaurants were reopening, people were walking their dogs in the park.

Residents of Kyiv, who survived weeks of Russian attacks early in the war, seemed largely out of step with the latest onslaught, singing songs in the subway stations where they hid, while cafe workers handed out drinks.

A crane removes a car destroyed by missile strikes on Kyiv
A crane removes a car destroyed by missile strikes on Kyiv. Photography: Ruslan Kaniuka/Ukrinform/NurPhoto/Rex/Shutterstock

Oleksii Striapko, who works for an IT company, recently moved to Kyiv from Kharkiv as it seemed like a safe haven from missile attacks. “I lived in Kyiv for two peaceful months without explosions or deaths,” he said. “I was just getting used to living again, trying to make plans for the future. But Russia again destroys everything, kills, steals, terrorizes all Ukrainians without exception. Nevertheless, he added: “I understood today that I am no longer afraid, as I was at the beginning of the war. I know what to do and how to behave in a dangerous situation.

Tetiana Kononir, who lives nearby, was watching the cleanup of Shevchenko Park, which was already underway early Monday afternoon. “It’s terrible,” she said. ” I do not know what to say. Who can know what Putin thinks. I can’t even tell if he’s sick or if he’s trying to scare us or not.

“I don’t know what’s in his head, what’s in his heart… It just brings us together even more. He will never defeat us. He will never bring us to our knees.

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