Film and photograph library – Photo Bolsillo http://photobolsillo.com/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 14:01:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://photobolsillo.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Film and photograph library – Photo Bolsillo http://photobolsillo.com/ 32 32 Take a look at the inspirations behind ‘The Witcher’ https://photobolsillo.com/take-a-look-at-the-inspirations-behind-the-witcher/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 14:00:10 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/take-a-look-at-the-inspirations-behind-the-witcher/ The hugely popular Netflix series “The witcher”Has everything you could expect from a fantastic adventure, including terrifying beasts, magical feats, sword battles and power games. In the first season, we saw the fate of the main character, a monster hunter named Geralt of Rivia (Henry Cavill), become inextricably linked with that of the tormented witch […]]]>

The hugely popular Netflix series “The witcher”Has everything you could expect from a fantastic adventure, including terrifying beasts, magical feats, sword battles and power games. In the first season, we saw the fate of the main character, a monster hunter named Geralt of Rivia (Henry Cavill), become inextricably linked with that of the tormented witch Yennefer of Vengerberg (Anya Chalotra) and the young princess Cirilla ( Freya Allan) – whose role and powers are beginning to emerge in the long awaited season 2, which was unveiled on December 17.

But the show, based on a world created by Polish writer Andrzej Sapkowski, also has a sense of humor that often borders on the wacky, and it even generated a cult pop-rock earworm, “Flip a coin at your witcher.” The stylistic palette of the series is as unpredictable as it is broad.

To keep the inspiration flowing, showrunner Lauren Schmidt Hissrich sticks ideas and references on a door. She was still a screenwriter and executive producer of the Netflix superhero show. “The Umbrella Academy” when she landed her new gig, in august 2017, so the door did double duty for a while.

“When it was opened it was all ‘Umbrella Academy’, and when it was closed I was able to start digging into ‘The Witcher’,” she said.

Schmidt Hissrich, 43, spoke via video from Los Angeles about some of the inspirations behind “The Witcher”. These are edited excerpts from the conversation.

Schmidt Hissrich has long loved Jim Henson’s film “Labyrinth” (1986), in which teenage Sarah is drawn into a strange world of goblins and fairies.

“You have live action, you have songs, you have fun, and you have these creatures too, and they all feel like the same world,” she said. “For ‘The Witcher’ we struggled at the start with, ‘How do you get people to take a story seriously when there are monsters flying left and right?’ I loved how “Labyrinth” brought all of these things together. ”

The showrunner distinguished the scene in which the Junk Lady agitates the lure of material goods to distract Sarah from her mission. “There’s that feeling of ‘If only I could stay here, if only I could believe it,’ Schmidt Hissrich said. [Sarah] knows it’s not real.

She likened the scene to that of the new season in which Ciri has to make a decision between past and future – “and that’s really what ‘Labyrinth’ is too.”

When she started the series, Schmidt Hissrich felt it was important to understand where Sapkowski was coming from. His research included a two-week trip to Poland and following Polish photographers on Instagram. Among them was Michal koralewski, whose image of the old town of the medieval city of Poznan has been on its wall for a few years now.

“The fantastic is often portrayed as awful and austere and gray, and everything is dusty because it’s the worst time in the world,” she said with a laugh. “One of the things I wanted to bring to ‘The Witcher’ was a sense of light and color, so I was immediately drawn to the colors, the buildings, the brightness of the photo.”

Schmidt Hissrich also appreciated that the photo did not look like a cliché from the Middle Ages. “The spectacle does not take place in our conception of the medieval world – it is a fantastic world without limits of time and space,” she said. “A lot of times our characters speak a bit more modern language than we expected. I know that’s a lot for a photo, but for me, it touched all of those things.

Schmidt Hissrich isn’t looking for horror movies (“They Give Me Nightmares”), but she makes an exception for Robert Eggers’ epoch shock “The Witch,” from 2016. “The Idea of ​​Telling a Story horror by what you don’t see deeply informed about the way we approach things in ‘The Witcher’, ”she said.

More precisely, it draws parallels between the heroine of the film, Thomasin (played by Anya Taylor-Joy) and Yennefer. “Thomasin wants to accept who she is in Puritan New England, as well as independence and power against societal constraints,” Schmidt Hissrich said. “Their journeys interest me a lot, and also, more generally, the confusion of good and evil. Temptation vs. Resistance: This theme from “The Witch” directly informs Yennefer’s story this season. “

Schmidt Hissrich’s association with Netflix began on the “Daredevil” series a few years ago, and she wrote the episode featuring Elektra Natchios, the murderer of Marvel in season 2. Pulling a copy of Michael Del Mundo’s “Elektra: Bloodlines” comic from a shelf, she flipped through a few pages.

“Visually, she goes from dancer to murderer and all those ribbons become blood,” Schmidt Hissrich stressed. “He’s a character who is forced to let go of all other parts of his identity, to become that one thing, an assassin. Geralt is a witcher and we see what happens when that facade has to start to crumble.

The choreographic element crept into Geralt’s fight in a season 2 library. “It’s such a beautiful dance, and it’s a very environmental fight – he takes a stool here, a lamp there , because he doesn’t have his weapons. ” said Schmidt Hissrich. “There is something reminiscent of ballet in there. “

On Schmidt Hissrich’s desk is a cute little teacup with the word “poison” printed on it. “I like to write about contrast,” she said. “There’s a scene in episode 6 that’s very quiet; the music is quite nice and pleasant. And then something very violent happens. Presenting these contrasts is one way to keep our audience on board. “

Obviously, “The Witcher” has its fair share of sex and violence, but it also doesn’t linger uncomfortably, unlike other series that may come to mind. “It’s an adult show – kids shouldn’t watch it,” Schmidt Hissrich said. “But that doesn’t mean that every time we see someone have their head cut off, we have to stay on their heads and see it all spring up.”



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Young artists to watch in 2022 https://photobolsillo.com/young-artists-to-watch-in-2022/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 03:31:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/young-artists-to-watch-in-2022/ A critic and writer once said to me in the context of the arts: “It is important to invest and engage in your generation – a collector should follow the artists of their day, and artists should deliberate with them. the writers and curators of their own generation. This thought has stuck with me ever […]]]>

A critic and writer once said to me in the context of the arts: “It is important to invest and engage in your generation – a collector should follow the artists of their day, and artists should deliberate with them. the writers and curators of their own generation. This thought has stuck with me ever since, especially when it comes to younger artists who reflect our current times, the things we experience and issues close to our hearts like ecological imbalance or political polarity.

In the context of today’s young contemporary artists, few strong themes emerge. First, they are ready to experiment. Rejecting the hegemony of the West or even following in the footsteps of their elders, their art is void of any baggage of the past. Second, there is a renewed interest in skills. Well-executed works, with a solid technical basis, seem more common than before. And finally, the fundamental ideas are more rooted in their own traditions, their homeland and their immediate environment.

As we begin this new year, here is a list of early career artists to watch:

Read also: Mapping change at the Chennai Photo Biennale

Abhishek Dodiya: a new approach to metal

Dodiya is engaged in the dismantling and reconstruction of his works. Inspiration often comes from a deep observation of one’s surroundings. “I invite viewers to experience the openness of the surface of my work which revisits lived events, aggravated by the complexity of emotions,” he says. His Cyclone series is particularly noteworthy, where he used sheets that appear malleable to the softest touch. His documentation of recent devastating storms in Gujarat’s coastal areas is a grim reminder of the potential impact of the climate crisis.

This comes naturally to Dodiya, who lives and works in Bhavnagar (Gujarat), known for its shipbreaking industry. He says his choice of material and process is heavily influenced by the “space, texture, sound and smell” of his hometown. He graduated from Maharaja Sayajirao University in Baroda in 2020. Since then Dodiya has been awarded by Gujarat State Lalit Kala Academy and Prafulla Dahanukar Foundation.

“Nox Umbra-Fallen Angels” by Divya Singh


Also read: Young Iraqi film students tell their own stories from Mosul

Divya Singh: a look at memory

Singh’s practice is mainly rooted in paintings that explore themes of isolation and memory. These emanate in large part from a poetic engagement with the very idea of ​​”time”. “I borrow from the disciplines of photography, writing, as well as cinema. These various elements come together in my work, ”she says, and this is most clearly seen in the recent artist books she has created. Singh is currently working with instant film / polaroid. His paintings evoke the same sensitivity as that of a period photograph.

She studies the idea of ​​time: while oil painting is a slow process, Polaroid is instantaneous. Instant photography initially replaced drawing. It just captured the moment she could refer to for her paintings. But gradually, Singh’s photos started to resemble her paintings and vice versa, and she allowed this crossbreeding of qualities to persist. His art is very relevant to our contemporary times and encourages viewers to look inside. Singh received her MA in Fine Arts from Shiv Nadar University in 2018. She was recently awarded the Space118 Fine Arts Fellowship.

Untitled sculpture by Gurjeet Singh

Untitled sculpture by Gurjeet Singh


Read also: The legendary Neil Young releases his 41st album

Gurjeet Singh: sculptures that tell new stories

Singh was introduced to the art by his family. “As a child, I saw women in the family always busy decorating the house, sewing and embroidering,” he says. He was involved in all of these activities and learned the techniques from his sisters. Singh also helped his father in his scooter repair shop, which helped him immensely in learning how to operate machines.

His soft sculptures padded with textile and embellished with embroidered patterns are a response to his environment and his experiences full of stories and humor. He conveys them by creating imagined characters. Singh’s sculptures revolve around “behind-the-scenes stories, abuse and neglect, identity and loss, and are often very personal”. Singh completed his Masters with a Gold Medal from the College of Art, Chandigarh in 2019. He is a recipient of the Khoj and Kochi-Muziris Biennale Fellowships and recently received the Inlaks Fine Arts Award and the Amrita Sher-Gil Award.

The

Koyal Raheja’s “claustrophobia”


Read also: Artist Paula Sengupta recovers chintz from its colonial history

Koyal Raheja: questioning the systems of the past

In Raheja’s explorations, she asks a question about the enigma between the body as a living organism and the body which loses its significant behavioral elements, reduced to a tool, regulated by its mechanical efficiency. His works elaborate on the behaviors and transfigurations of a docile body which passes to a dictated body. In a recent series, exploring ideas around gesture, space and self, she draws figures performing the regulating gesture of a school assembly, each individual at an equal distance from each other. Raheja’s “bodies” encompass regimented, lyrical and minute variations.

“Through my work I try to challenge the systems and structures of the past and present using different lenses of conformity, rebellion and separation,” she says. Raheja graduated from Studio Arts College International in Florence in 2019. Her works have been part of major exhibitions in Italy and India, notably at Cenacolo Fiorentini # 8 in the library of the San Marco Museum, Florence; Bring into play at Accaventquatro Casa Galleria, Prato; and Phantoms of Image (in) Nation at the High Street Gallery, Bangalore.

untitled work by Kumar Misal

untitled work by Kumar Misal


Read also: Artist Bharti Kher reconfigures the idea of ​​the body

Kumar Misal: shining the spotlight on the farmer

Misal comes from a family of farmers. His approach to art is based on a natural aesthetic that reflects the relationship and importance of nature in rural life. It also shows in the process. Misal makes her own paper and often uses mud to stain it. The surface itself therefore becomes essential to him, and being “made on the farm”, it becomes important for his cause. The artist’s prints evoke the perils of a farmer. It celebrates the act of growing food in a way that rejects any political connotation. Misal graduated from JJ School of Arts in Mumbai in 2020. He was awarded the Kochi-Muziris Biennial Fellowship and the Krishna Reddy Prize for Printmaking.

Sarah Naqvi’s “Cage”


Sarah Naqvi: a bold vision of societal stigma

Naqvi is a multimedia artist, who engages in stories on the theme of religious and societal stigmas. With textiles and embroidery being the primary medium of their practice, Naqvi uses the cathartic nature of the process to address relevant issues of marginalization. This stems from his training in textiles at the National Institute of Design in Ahmedabad.

“I was a restless child, always creating things but destroying them in the end. It was probably the genesis of the rebel in me, ”they say. Their works overlap with classical painting, technology and performance. Naqvi’s creative process is rooted in a highly personalized account of her experience with the company.

In his recent book entitled Solidarity coverage, Naqvi uses an image of a quilt from a protester from the Shaheen Bagh site. He embodies the strength and warmth of resilience and the hope to protect India’s secular future.

They studied Liberal Arts at St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai in 2018 and are currently participating in the De Ateliers residency program in Berlin. They have received the “The Phenomenal she” award from the National Indian Bar Association and the Ford NID Foundation grant.

Read also: How the pandemic made an artist sensitive to emptiness

Sonali Sonam, from the series 'Reimagining the Mundane'

Sonali Sonam, from the series ‘Reimagining the Mundane’


Sonali Sonam: celebrating beauty in the mundane

Intrigued by the idea of ​​non-static beauty, Sonam observes and draws inspiration from her own surrounding and socio-political scenarios. His works, influenced by the miniature style, explore the natural world in an urban setting. According to her, beauty is not personal, rather it depends on the beholder and it changes over time. “I’m interested in how a collection of mundane activities can become a new reality, where once we all exist but at the same time it becomes strange to us,” she says. In his recent series entitled Re-imagine the mundane, she creates scenes of natural beauty through the flora and fauna in an urban environment without everything that has been created by man. Sonam graduated from the College of Arts, New Delhi in 2021. She was awarded the Shristi AIF Fellowship and the Camel Art Foundation National and Zonal Awards.

Read also: A nice balance between the delicate and the disturbing


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Want to hear the first commercial for a soda, recorded a century ago? Now you can https://photobolsillo.com/want-to-hear-the-first-commercial-for-a-soda-recorded-a-century-ago-now-you-can/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 18:07:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/want-to-hear-the-first-commercial-for-a-soda-recorded-a-century-ago-now-you-can/ Start your day with LAist Sign up for the Morning Brief, delivered on weekdays. The first audio commercial for a soda. A vaudeville act about sneezing. A 1920s home ‘exercise band’ featuring a man giving Swedish gymnastics instructions accompanied by an orchestra. One of the first musical performances recorded live, a choir of 4000 people […]]]>

The first audio commercial for a soda. A vaudeville act about sneezing. A 1920s home ‘exercise band’ featuring a man giving Swedish gymnastics instructions accompanied by an orchestra. One of the first musical performances recorded live, a choir of 4000 people in London singing Handel. A 1913 recording where a Boy Scout leader shows all the patrol calls used by the Boy Scouts at the time (you won’t believe how well this man could imitate a bird).

Over the past year, we’ve been working on our podcast, The World According to Sound, researching archives like the Library of Congress and the New York Public Library to unearth and preserve old recordings like these. . We’re making an experimental audio show that celebrates sound recordings made before 1923, many of which have not been listened to in decades by more than a handful of people.

Many of these records have been lost. Others are buried in archives. But from January 1, several hundred thousand will enter the public domain.

This is a major change in the world of audio.

It’s a great moment in history for sound archivists

Until recently, sound recordings were not covered by federal copyright laws like films, literature or photographs, all of which enter the public domain after some time. Then, in 2018, the federal government passed the Music Modernization Act. The law amended copyright laws for recorded sound and, among other things, required that every commercial recording made in the United States before 1923 enter the public domain on January 1, 2022.

That’s a huge amount of material. The Association for Recorded Sound Collections (ARSC) estimates that some 400,000 recordings will fall into the public domain.

In anticipation of this event, archivists across the country digitized and downloaded commercial audio recordings, as well as eccentric and amateur recordings, making it more accessible and accessible to the public. This is their great time to present the recordings they have kept for all these years and share them with individuals and media, who can now take this material, remix it and re-edit it. This makes new projects possible, like the show we’re working on on the origins of sound recording.

AT The world according to sound, we do a series of live listening events. Each show has a different theme and a collection of work done by us and other radio producers, musicians and sound artists. The audio is spatialized to the headphones and streamed live to people listening across the country. We send attendees an eye mask and an invitation to settle into a meditative evening of intentional listening.

Thomas Edison and his first phonograph.

This treasure trove of very old recordings that have fallen into the public domain seemed perfectly suited to one of our parties. For the past year, archivists have been sharing with us sounds from their collections, some of which are about to enter the public domain, and others that are historical gems they have been working on for years to digitize.

The Library of Congress has one of the largest collections. For years he has been uploading recordings online to his National jukebox. Their archives contain many musical works of historical significance, such as the earliest recordings of the Fisk University Jubilee Singers, a group that popularized Spirituals and is still active today. This is a 1909 recording of Little David, play on your harp.

There is more than music in the Library of Congress collection. There are children’s stories, dramatic performances, vaudeville acts, practical records and other genres that companies were experimenting with as consumer products around the turn of the century. One of those experiences is this recording, which may be the very first home “exercise band”.

The Jukebox has an entire section dedicated to oral creation and recitations. This is a poem by Edgar A. Guest titled The old wooden bathtub. It was recorded in 1929, when much of the country still lacked electricity and telephones, but the speaker of the poem longs for a simpler time.

Not only could the Edison household phonograph play recordings, it allowed people to create their own. People would record on blank wax cylinders, or take a commercial cylinder, shave it and make their own recording over it.

Archivists estimate that Americans made several hundred thousand home recordings during the first decades of the 20th century. Most are lost. UC Santa Barbara cylinder archives has over 650. This is one of our favorites. We hear a man calling his dog Mugsy, who also accompanies him on a musical number.

The cylinder archives contain more than 10,000 wax cylinders, which served as the recording medium for devices like the Edison household phonograph. Curators have created thematic playlists everything from Tahitian field recordings to popular WWI songs.

For our live broadcast, the New York Public Library digitized a recording of a Boy Scout leader demonstrating patrol calls. This is the first time that this document has been digitized. We would love to share it with you here, but the audio cannot be released to the public until January 1.

The New York Public Library also showed us a wealth of recordings made by Lionel Mapleson, who was one of the first to attempt to systematically record a series of live musical performances. He was librarian at the Metropolitan Opera House and from 1901 to 1903 he made recordings of the opera. We made this story about Mapleson’s recording efforts for Radio newspapers.

A man with a mustache stands with a finger to his lips in front of the large horn of a phonograph in a black and white photograph.

Metropolitan Opera House librarian Lionel Mapleson, pictured here circa 1901, was one of the first to attempt to systematically record the live performances.

Archivists have played a vital role in the preservation of these ancient records. The media is fragile, and without protection from the elements, wax cylinders and discs can crack and become unplayable.

At the same time, many of these recordings were first kept by private collectors and then acquired by archives. This is the story of the Mapleson cylinders, which the New York Public Library obtained from a private collector, Mr. Herbert Bretnall. The same goes for personal records and some of the other cylinders in the UC Santa Barbara cylinder archives. Many were donated by David Giovannoni, who has set up its own online repository for the sound recordings he collected.

Online you can find many old cylinders and recordings that people have uploaded. Archivists at the Library of Congress have told us about what is believed to be the very first audio commercial for a soda. They didn’t have it in their collection, but we were able to find a version online. Someone with an old Edison phonograph had taken a video of the cylinder being played, which is not an advertisement for Coke or Pepsi, but a state of Maine favorite brand of soda.

Archivists have also told us about the existence of an early advertisement for the Edison household phonograph. In it, you can hear the hopes of the companies that recorded sound will be a major commodity.

This ad actually became the backbone of the storytelling. our live show, which we air on january 6th. For the show, we’ve remixed a lot of old audios like the tracks above, added a few new recordings of our own, and sprinkled a little context here and there to help you immerse yourself in all those old recordings.

The whole show would have been impossible if the Music Modernization Act hadn’t put these recordings into the public domain. If you want to listen to other sound gems that will go public on January 1, you can check out this list of records set up by ARSC.

Sam Harnett is co-founder and co-host of The world according to sound, and a former tech and work reporter. Chris Hoff is an independent audio manufacturer based in San Francisco.


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Is this your house The Corley Photographic Collection of Queensland Homes Needs Your Help https://photobolsillo.com/is-this-your-house-the-corley-photographic-collection-of-queensland-homes-needs-your-help/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 19:32:27 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/is-this-your-house-the-corley-photographic-collection-of-queensland-homes-needs-your-help/ 2813 Ipswich Road in Darra is no longer officially an address – just a patch of grass next to the busy Ipswich Motorway in southwest Brisbane. But dive into the State Library of Queensland (SLQ) Corley Explorer Website and you will discover that in the 1960s it was the site of a cherished family home, […]]]>

2813 Ipswich Road in Darra is no longer officially an address – just a patch of grass next to the busy Ipswich Motorway in southwest Brisbane.

But dive into the State Library of Queensland (SLQ) Corley Explorer Website and you will discover that in the 1960s it was the site of a cherished family home, built after work and on weekends by English immigrant George Brown for his wife Margaret and their daughters.

Mr. Brown made the bricks, built the walls, floors, and did all of the carpentry, electrical and plumbing work.

English immigrant George Brown built his own home in Darra for his wife and daughters.(Provided: Corley Explorer website, photographer: Frank Corley)

This is just one of the stories sparked off by a single black and white photo, taken by the late photographic duo Frank and Eunice Corley over 50 years ago.

Over 60,000 of their images of Queensland homes are featured online, with the originals kept in a temperature-controlled storage space at the State Library.

English immigrant George Brown built his home in Darra in southwest Brisbane in the 1960s.
Mr. Brown made the bricks, built the walls, floors, and did all of the carpentry, electrical and plumbing work.(Provided: State Library of Queensland)

But SLQ program manager Chenoa Pettrup said 10,000 properties have yet to be identified and that she is encouraging members of the public to add places and their memorabilia to the collection.

A couple of entrepreneurs

She describes the Corleys as an entrepreneurial couple who ran a number of businesses, including the Pan American Home Photographic Company.

“Frank would drive the streets in his Cadillac and basically drive and hang out the window and take a picture of every house on the street.

Frank Corley smiles while holding his camera
Frank Corley with his camera, taken in 1994 by Doug Spowart.(Provided: State Library of Queensland)

“His wife Eunice would park a mobile development unit [in a Bedford delivery van] nearby and she was developing the photographs, then they would have a salesperson try to resell the photos to the owners.

Chenoa Pettrup, Program Manager, State Library of Queensland, with some of the photos of Brisbane housing from the Corley Collection.
Chenoa Pettrup says the SLQ is also researching stories behind the houses.(ABC News: Sally Eeles)

The Corleys charged 50 cents for a print and 99 cents for a calendar or greeting card and it is estimated that they took around 250,000 photos of houses from Bundaberg to Beenleigh in South Queensland.

The SLQ has all the images the couple had not sold.

The images are a snapshot in time, featuring old-style cabins with wire mesh fencing and more modern two-level homes with cinderblock walls.

“They give us a sense of when and where they were taken and I think continuing to add photos gives us a better insight into how this place has changed over time,” Ms. Pettrup said.

Chenoa Pettrup, Program Manager at the State Library of Queensland, working in the temperature-controlled storage area in Brisbane.
Chenoa Pettrup working in the air-conditioned storage area of ​​the SLQ.(ABC News: Sally Eeles )

“Pretty good story”

Michael Stone found a 1970s image of his Greenslopes home in the Online Collection and managed to connect with the descendants of the Norwegian family who built it in 1915.

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“We figured it had a pretty good story that we wanted to capture when we did our renovation,” Mr. Stone said.

“The original house is pretty much intact – we’ve done a lot of construction around it – some of the stamped metal cornices and ceilings are certainly all in place.

The Hein family in 1918 inside their dining room at their Queenslander home on Sackville Street in Greenslopes on the south side of Brisbane.
Hein family in the 1918 dining room of their Queenslander home on Sackville Street in Greenslopes.(Provided: Michael Stone )

“The original view of Google Street View”

The photographs of the Corleys were donated to SLQ in 1995, prior to Mr Corley’s death in October of the same year.

His wife Eunice had passed away some time before.

Doug Spowart and his partner Victoria Cooper made initial contact with the SLQ after Mr Corley invited them to his Annerley house and showed them boxes of fingerprints.

“I considered this to be history – an incredible resource,” said Dr. Spowart.

The couple befriended Mr Corley in the early 1990s, while Dr Spowart was working at a photo gallery in south Brisbane.

Dr Spowart was even able to peek inside the Bedford van where Ms Corley had processed the film.

“It was a tight squeeze – I have enormous respect for what Eunice did,” said Dr Spowart.

As for Frank Corley, Dr Spowart and Dr Cooper agreed that he was one of a kind.

“He had this pretty glow in his eyes – everything had a story,” Dr. Cooper said.

Dr Spowart said Frank Corley also took photos in the Northern Territory and South Australia.

“I called him the man who photographed every house in Australia – the original Google Street View,” Dr Spowart said.


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Where to go in Meow Wolf Denver when he kicks the kids out during the adult https://photobolsillo.com/where-to-go-in-meow-wolf-denver-when-he-kicks-the-kids-out-during-the-adult/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 13:55:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/where-to-go-in-meow-wolf-denver-when-he-kicks-the-kids-out-during-the-adult/ A friend who visited Convergence station at Meow Wolf Denver had only one complaint. “There are just too many kids, man,” he recalls. “I was on mushrooms, and the last shit I wanted to see was this kid running all over TikTok, and another one leaps out of nowhere to take the seat that I […]]]>

A friend who visited Convergence station at Meow Wolf Denver had only one complaint. “There are just too many kids, man,” he recalls. “I was on mushrooms, and the last shit I wanted to see was this kid running all over TikTok, and another one leaps out of nowhere to take the seat that I was watching in that alien bubble. I almost threw him away. over the ledge. ”

In response to requests from those who want a child-free experience Convergence station, Meow Wolf will be hosting four 21+ Nights, dubbed the Adulti-Verse, at the start of the year. During these evenings, adult clients will be able to browse the multiple universes of the massive installation, drink by hand and experience Convergence station with no child in sight. While these Adulti-Verse events are kind of a tryout, Erin Barnes, PR manager for Meow Wolf Denver, says she expects this to become an ongoing feature.

Here are five must-see spots during the Adult-Verse:

Click to enlarge

Cosmoèdre in Numina.

Kate russell

Cosmohedron

This “alien bubble” is found in the Numina universe, known for its ethereal but swampy atmosphere full of secret nooks and crannies. On the second floor of the Cosmoèdre is the Frog Egg Garden designed by Emmanuelle Jean; inside you have a bird’s eye view of the mystical installation. But that’s not all: if enough people sit on the padded depressions around the circular room and touch the windows, the colorful ceiling comes to life.

Mexican robots

Entering the icy world of Eemia with its colorful kaleidegothic cathedral, you can’t miss the two robots that offer thrones designed by Eemia’s brain, the matt king. From these seats, you can play with various knobs and buttons and control the lasers that reflect off the celestial ceiling – and you might even end up opening a wormhole. As there will be no children, this will be the right moment to fully discover the cathedral; depending on your state of mind, it might make you think of a psychedelic mini-Hagia Sofia built by aliens.

Click to enlarge The adults are in the driver's seat of Rocket Car during the Adult.  - KENNEDY COTTRELL

The adults are in the driver’s seat of Rocket Car during the Adult.

Kennedy cottrell

Rocket Car on C Street

Like almost everything in Meow Wolf Denver, this car parked on C Street is meant for interaction. It’s a kid’s favorite too, so if there are hordes of kids preventing you from cranking the engine, the Adulti-Verse is your chance. Play with all the levers, buttons and widgets, and see what you can activate from inside the vehicle designed by Christophe miller.

Click to enlarge Magic Hollow is more magical without children.  - NATHAN HINDMAN

Magic Hollow is more magical without children.

Nathan Hindman

Make your fortune tell at Magic Hollow

While on C Street, visit Magic Hollow, a haunted psychic store designed by Moss Lair. If you see Sid the Psychic wandering around with a stethoscope, be sure to ask for your fortune – he will tell you where to go in Convergence Station to take your worries away, if only for a short time.

Click to enlarge Moiré Room can be a psychedelic experience.  -KATE RUSSELL

Moiré Room can be a psychedelic experience.

Kate russell

Moiré room

This secret room, performed by a local artist and DJ Cache stream, is located in the world of Ossuary. Flowing black and white lines are projected throughout the room and interact with your movements, making it a great place to take an interesting photo. Fair warning: Meow Wolf warns that this can be a difficult space for those who are particularly sensitive or have epilepsy. And it will also be difficult if you have drunk too many adult drinks during the Adulti-Verse.

Meow Wolf’s Adulti-Verse will descend on the following Wednesdays: January 5 and 26, February 2 and 23. Tickets are $ 45; find more information on Meow Wolf Denver here.


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The Chicano art movement has lost two giants: commentary https://photobolsillo.com/the-chicano-art-movement-has-lost-two-giants-commentary/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 13:41:05 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/the-chicano-art-movement-has-lost-two-giants-commentary/ Someone much wiser than I once said, “We’ve been burying too many good people lately. The late November and early December were devastating for the art world as we lost two of the giants of the Chicano art movement and I lost two close personal friends (as well as my beloved mother, Mary Isabelle Revello, […]]]>

Someone much wiser than I once said, “We’ve been burying too many good people lately. The late November and early December were devastating for the art world as we lost two of the giants of the Chicano art movement and I lost two close personal friends (as well as my beloved mother, Mary Isabelle Revello, known as Mary Sanchez).

Roberto C. Lucero passed away on November 10 and Stevon P. Lucero passed away on November 28. I had the privilege of working with the two maestros and of helping to build the Incorporated Artes Monumentales (IAM) studios in the Chicano Humanities and Arts Council – the name proposed by Stevon.

Click to enlarge

Stevon Lucero and Roberto Lucero.

Courtesy of R. Maestas

I met Roberto in the early 1970s, when we were both starting our journey into the art world. He had done the mural at the Westside Action Center in 11th and Santa Fe, and I had done murals for Interstate Research Associates on 16th Street, the Denver Community Development Corporation, and the National Chicano Health Organization (NCHO). These murals were all included in the Exxon program Neighborhood art exposure; this show has been seen everywhere!

One fateful day in 1976, Emanuel Martinez invited us to his studio to meet Andrew Manning and Richard Barrera, two artists who had studied with the brilliant Mexican muralist Jorge Gonzales Camanera. Robert Lucero, Roberto Reyes, and I answered the call, and we quickly saw slides of the most inspiring, amazing, and mind-numbing art! During this time Robert Lucero and I were commissioned by NCHO to create a series of medical themed paintings. His designs were based on indigenous themes and were a joy to see.

Roberto Reyes got a studio in Seventh and Santa Fe in 1978, and IAM Studios was born there along with Roberto Reyes, Freddy Sanchez, Roberto Lucero and Al Sanchez. We have inspired, helped and supported each other, creating exhibits for the US Postal Service, NCHO, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency in Boulder, the Pueblo Fine Arts Center and many more. Roberto Lucero went on to do a mural for the University of Colorado and the UMC Building, and we saw his work in the fall when he became a gardener at Mile High Stadium. He always painted big! The Broncos!

That year I heard about a new artist in town; his name was Stevon Lucero. Could it be the Stevon Lucero of Wyoming who got letters printed early (1964) Avengers and Strange tales comics that I was such a fan of? Yes it was, and I quickly hired Stevon to work on the IAM / City Walls project. City Walls was put together by Carlos Santistevan through the office of Congressman Pat Schroeder in conjunction with the Colorado Paint Company (Ken Walls), IAM Studios, and the Metro Denver Urban Coalition. Stevon has joined Jerry Jaramillo, Freddy Sanchez, Carlos Sandoval and Al Sanchez in the IAM / City Walls team.

Click to enlarge Stevon Lucero came to Denver from Wyoming.  - WITH THE AUTHORIZATION OF R. MAESTAS

Stevon Lucero came to Denver from Wyoming.

courtesy of R. Maestas

Our first project was with the Leiter brigade from Chile. Orlando Leiter was the Chilean Ambassador to the United States who was assassinated in downtown Washington, DC, by a car bomb planted by Chilean secret police; his children painted murals across the United States in memory of their father. Freddy Sanchez acquired a wall at 13th and Santa Fe at Zick Market; it seemed like almost every artist in Denver showed up to throw paint with us. “Liberty” was viewed by thousands of people every day as a gateway to downtown Denver.

We followed up with “Earthrise” at North Lincoln Housing Projects; “Balance,” a three-story mural on a five-story building in the middle of downtown Denver at 16th and Wazee; and the three murals of the La Familia leisure center, “Athletics 1 and 2” and “La Familia Cosmica”. The Mexican Ambassador saw “Libra” and was very impressed. Soon my team – Jerry Jaramillo, Stevon Lucero and Carlos Sandoval, all accomplished artists – was in Mexico. They arrived in full force, with a spectacular fresco that adorns the library of Zijautanejo.

the National Foundation for the Arts found out what was going on in Denver and started funding us. We received money for City Walls II and IAM, we were joined by Chispa Productions of Juan and Danny Salazar (who had directed “Mestizo Majic”, a short film with City Walls in the background), the Dance Group by Enrique Montoya and other artists to create the Chicano Council for the Humanities and the Arts.
Stevon Lucero became the “face” of CHAC when he opened the CHAC studio in Seventh and Santa Fe, across from the former IAM Studios. He liked to talk to everyone.

In 1991, I was selected to do a mural for the new US Postal Service building at 53rd and Quebec. Stevon was commissioned to make the marketplace for “Aztec” at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science in City Park. I immediately volunteered to witness and photograph this epic undertaking; I was surrounded by Aztec treasures and I was working with Stevon again! As the deadline for “Aztec” approached, Stevon pushed himself so hard that he had his first heart attack, and his wife and I completed the temple for him. The great Mexican archaeologist Eduardo Matos Moctezuma expressed his admiration and blessed Stevon’s efforts. After “Aztec”, Stevon’s health began to fail him, but he never stopped painting.

Stevon was especially proud of his mural for his hometown of Laramie. In 2020 Stevon received his last major order and he was so happy when he showed off his brilliant designs for his Meow Wolf Denver project. I was impressed, as always. Stevon constructed his own exquisite canvases and then took us to another eternity as only a master can.

Stevon had three children – Tana, Paul and Josh – as well as a group of grandchildren and, of course, his favorite artist: Arlette, his lifelong wife. I was fortunate enough to spend so much time smoking, chatting about Infinity, and our favorite comic book artist, Jack Kirby, with Stevon.

It was an honor to share the career of Roberto and Stevon, two titans of the art world !! Thanks for the ride, and what a ride it was. “They were Chileans.” Con mucho amor and gratitude!

Con mucho carino, tu amigo.

Al Sanchez


Westword frequently posts opinion pieces and essays on topics of interest to the community on westword.com on weekends; the opinions expressed in these plays are those of the authors, not
Word from the West. Hdo you have one you would like to submit? Send it to [email protected], where you can also comment on this comment.


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The disturbing computer scene left on the cutting room floor https://photobolsillo.com/the-disturbing-computer-scene-left-on-the-cutting-room-floor/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 21:16:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/the-disturbing-computer-scene-left-on-the-cutting-room-floor/ Before Andy Muschietti took on the role of director, “It: Chapter One” was originally scheduled to be directed by Cary Fukunaga (“True Detective”, “No Time To Die”) with a screenplay co-written by Chase Palmer. The script went through a variety of drafts, but Fukunaga ultimately left the project after allegedly wanting to lean into the […]]]>

Before Andy Muschietti took on the role of director, “It: Chapter One” was originally scheduled to be directed by Cary Fukunaga (“True Detective”, “No Time To Die”) with a screenplay co-written by Chase Palmer. The script went through a variety of drafts, but Fukunaga ultimately left the project after allegedly wanting to lean into the much darker aspects of Stephen King’s novel and present something much more unsettling than what was ultimately shown to be. ‘screen. In an episode of Variety’s “Proofreading“Skarsgård mentioned shooting a scene that he himself described as” disturbing “, but which was inevitably cut from the final product.

“There was a scene we shot that was a flashback to the 1600s, before Pennywise [was Pennywise]”, described the actor.” The scene turned out to be really, really disturbing. And I am not the clown. I look more like myself. “

“It’s very disturbing and it’s kind of a backstory for what it is, or where Pennywise is from,” Skarsgård added. “This could be something worth exploring in the second. The idea is that the It entity was dormant for thousands and thousands of years. [flashback] the scene alludes to that. “

Moviegoers immediately scoured the internet trying to track down the elusive scene, with Search for editors a 2016 draft of Gary Dauberman’s screenplay containing a missing flashback scene set after the Losers Club fought Pennywise in the Neibolt Street house, and before the scene featuring the tyrant Henry Bowers playing with his weapon dad.


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Iconic film with El Paso connection added to Nat’l Film registry https://photobolsillo.com/iconic-film-with-el-paso-connection-added-to-natl-film-registry/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 12:10:38 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/iconic-film-with-el-paso-connection-added-to-natl-film-registry/ A film with an El Paso connection about a beloved Mexican-American Tejano Music singer from Corpus Christi, Texas who was murdered by her assistant while on the cusp of pop music stardom will be preserved for an eternal time. The movie, of course, is “Selena”. The 1997 biopic is one of the films added to […]]]>

A film with an El Paso connection about a beloved Mexican-American Tejano Music singer from Corpus Christi, Texas who was murdered by her assistant while on the cusp of pop music stardom will be preserved for an eternal time.

The movie, of course, is “Selena”. The 1997 biopic is one of the films added to the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry for 2021.

Twenty-five films judged “culturally, historically or aesthetically significant“are added each year.

U.S. Representative Joaquin Castro of San Antonio led the charge for the film to be nominated. In a letter sent to the Librarian of Congress on behalf of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Castro, wrote, in part:

[“Selena”] addresses important themes of cultural identity and assimilation facing Mexican-American communities as they navigate their personal ties to two cultures and two languages.

The film became a beloved icon of Latin culture and met with widespread success, proving once and for all that Latin stories are American stories.

Given its importance as a work of Latin cinema, we believe it deserves to be kept in the Library of Congress.

The El Paso connection

The movie that made Jennifer Lopez a household name has two El Paso connections.

native of El Paso Lupe ontiveros plays Yolanda Saldívar, the former fan club president who was convicted of murdering the beloved music legend. Ontiveros, a graduate of El Paso High School, died in 2012 of liver cancer.

Selena marks the fourth film that Ontiveros was a part of that is registered with the National Film Registry. zoot costume, El North, and Real women have curves are the other three.

Everything for Selenas

El Paso is also Erick Carrillo’s hometown. Carillo, who now lives in Los Angeles, portrayed the character mentioned in the script as “First Cholo”.

Carillo, who steals the stage, delivers two of the film’s most memorable lines: “That bumper was pulled off by the Selenas bus” and the oft-quoted, “Everything for Selenas!” As many times as I’ve seen the movie, this scene always makes me LOL.

“Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi,” “The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring” and “A Nightmare on Elm Street” are also among the 25 films chosen for preservation this year.

WATCH: Most famous actor born every year


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Viewfinder: Top 5 with Mary Gaudin https://photobolsillo.com/viewfinder-top-5-with-mary-gaudin/ Tue, 14 Dec 2021 20:59:04 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/viewfinder-top-5-with-mary-gaudin/ Tell us about the five projects you selected as your favorites. What is the particularity of these projects? Mary Gaudin’s top 5: 1. Solo Pezo by Pezo von Ellrichshausen. Picture: Marie Gaudin Christian real estate developer Bourdais asked 11 architects to design a vacation home in the Aragon mountains in northern Spain. The first house […]]]>

Tell us about the five projects you selected as your favorites. What is the particularity of these projects?

Mary Gaudin’s top 5: 1. Solo Pezo by Pezo von Ellrichshausen. Picture:

Marie Gaudin

Christian real estate developer Bourdais asked 11 architects to design a vacation home in the Aragon mountains in northern Spain. The first house to be built, Solo Pezo by the Chilean architectural firm Pezo von Ellrichshausen, is a concrete house resembling a fortress with rooms emerging from a central courtyard. I was fortunate enough to spend two days photographing the house and experiencing it both in the sunlight and in the pouring rain.

I was lucky enough to be asked by the designer Knight Rufus photograph Te Koha – The New Zealand Room; part of the New Zealand Institute of Architects ‘Future Islands exhibition at the Venice Architecture Biennale in 2016. Although it is a very small space, Rufus’ use of New Zealand materials Zealander, especially wool and wood, gave the New Zealand room a lovely, sophisticated and warm feel.

Mary Gaudin’s top five: 2. Te Koha – The New Zealand Room, designed by Rufus Knight for the Venice Architecture Biennale. Picture:

Marie Gaudin

Photographing at Mies van der Rohe Villa Tugendhat was a personal project that I wanted to do since reading Simon Mawer’s novel The glass room. The novel traces the house through its incredible history. The house is really very well written as one of the central characters. Apparently the travertine marble wall glows like a fire when winter light enters the house in the middle of winter. I photographed him in the middle of summer (literally) and had a great day walking around the house in the obligatory plastic socks.

Mary Gaudin’s top 5: 3. Villa Tugendhat by Mies van der Rohe. Picture:

Marie Gaudin

The Erber House is one of the houses featured in the delivered Matthew Arnold and I have published on mid-century Christchurch architecture. It was designed by architect Nicholas Kennedy in the 1960s. It has been permanently inhabited by the original owners who commissioned the architect. There is a real sense of belonging to the house; something that I love to photograph as much as the architecture itself.

Mary Gaudin’s Top 5: 4. Nicholas Kennedy’s Erber House. Picture:

Marie Gaudin

The Van Doesburg house in the suburbs of Paris was built in the 1930s by the architect as a family home for his wife Nelly van Moorsel and her family. It now functions as an artist’s residence. I was tasked with taking pictures of the Dutch artist couple Danielle van Ark & Thomas Raat who lived in the house at the time. They had transformed the house into an exhibition space and invited their artist friends to exhibit pieces.

Mary Gaudin’s top 5: 5. Van Doesburg Studio-House by Theo van Doesburg. Picture:

Marie Gaudin

How did you start photography? And have you always been interested in architecture and buildings or has that changed over time?

I was given a film camera for my 21st birthday and loved the process of developing darkroom prints. Years later, while living in London, just for fun, I took an evening black and white photography class at Camberwell Art School. This led to a part-time four-year photography degree at the University of Westminster. The course was weighted half theory and half practical. I enjoyed the theoretical side of things a lot more than the studio work.

I became fascinated by architecture around this time. However, I think the love of architecture comes more from this feeling of being in a particular building that I had as a child. One building that comes to mind is the Warren and Mahoney Central Public Library in Christchurch, where I have spent many Saturday mornings choosing books.

How to capture a space? What is the secret to conveying the feeling of being there?

It’s a cliché but it’s so much about the light. In addition to using light, I play with depth of field and use my medium format camera when I can. I start shooting using a tripod for wide shots, then I like to take detailed freehand photos from different angles and heights. The result is often not perfect architectural photos, the lens being more atmospheric imagery. That way, I might not really be a classical architectural photographer.

How to stay inspired outside of work?

Lots of energetic walks from our 18 month old Labrador Aalto, either on the beach in the winter when dogs are tolerated, or in the countryside near Motpellier which is surprisingly wild.

Are there any projects or types of projects that you would like to photograph?

I would love to have a photography project in Japan.

When can we expect to see you again in New Zealand?

I can’t wait to be back in February 2022 for the first time in two years. I always arrive home with my carry-on packed with rolls of film for the projects that I invariably do back home.

Mary Gaudin and Matthew Arnold self-published Down the long driveway you’ll see it in 2014, a book on New Zealand Modernist houses. Last year they published a second book, I never met a straight line that I didn’t like, which focuses on mid-century Christchurch homes.



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21 photos make it hard to see why you don’t want to box https://photobolsillo.com/21-photos-make-it-hard-to-see-why-you-dont-want-to-box/ Sat, 11 Dec 2021 08:31:50 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/21-photos-make-it-hard-to-see-why-you-dont-want-to-box/ We can be a nasty species, and for some, fighting or running away usually ends up in a fight. And, for thousands of years, humanity has capitalized on our propensity for physical tests of strength. Indeed, humanity has been fighting in one form or another for as long as humanity has existed. And, it probably […]]]>

We can be a nasty species, and for some, fighting or running away usually ends up in a fight. And, for thousands of years, humanity has capitalized on our propensity for physical tests of strength.

Indeed, humanity has been fighting in one form or another for as long as humanity has existed. And, it probably became a game soon after it became a prerequisite for survival. Around 1650 BC, according to a fresco that has survived from the Bronze Age, man began to use gloves. Centuries later, boxing has grown into the big-stakes, big-money sport it is today. And, oh yeah, there’s still a lot of blood.

According to International Olympic Committee (IOC) website, Olympics.com, boxing was introduced as part of the Olympic Games at the end of the 7th century BC.

Some time later, these thongs were replaced by the cestus, a barbaric device that was essentially a glove with metal nails. “Unfortunately,” says the IOC, “it didn’t help the gladiators involved, as boxing matches at the time usually ended with the death of one of the contestants.”

Fortunately, modern day boxers don’t have to worry about getting punched in the face with metal nails, but the sport is always dangerous.

Some say the danger is worth it, as many boxers become celebrities both in and out of the ring. Muhammad Ali was not only the first fighter to win three heavyweight championships, but he was also the people’s hero. His finesse as a boxer was matched only by his quick wit, his witty returns and his pretty face – despite all the blows -.

And keeping that face pretty is no small feat when the point of sports is pretty much knocking out that face. So if you are planning to get into boxing, take a close look at your nose first and then at these pictures.

21 photos that make it clear why you don’t want to be a boxer

Humanity has been fighting in one form or another for as long as humanity has existed. And, it probably became a game soon after it became a prerequisite for survival. Around 1650 BC, according to a fresco that has survived from the Bronze Age, man began to use gloves. Centuries later, boxing has grown into the big-stakes, big-money sport it is today. And, oh yeah, there’s still a lot of blood. If you are planning to start boxing, take a good look at your nose and then at these pictures.

Canastota Boxing Hall of Fame Celebrates Ali-Frazier Match Every Day

30 famous people you might not know were college athletes

Stacker dug deep to find 30 celebrities who were previously college athletes. There are musicians, politicians, actors, writers, and reality TV stars. For some, a sports career was a real and promising possibility that ultimately faded away due to injury or some other call. Others made their way into a team and just played for the fun of it and the love of the sport. Read on to find out if your favorite actor, singer, or politician has ever worn a varsity jersey.

“Ghostbusters: Afterlife”: The Coolest Easter Eggs From Classic Movies

Every Marvel movie ever made, ranked from worst to first

From Captain America series at Black Widow, we have classified the whole history of Marvel in the cinema.

The 10 Biggest Unanswered Questions About the “Squid Game”


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