Film and photograph library – Photo Bolsillo http://photobolsillo.com/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 17:26:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://photobolsillo.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Film and photograph library – Photo Bolsillo http://photobolsillo.com/ 32 32 The best movies on Apple TV Plus https://photobolsillo.com/the-best-movies-on-apple-tv-plus/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 16:08:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/the-best-movies-on-apple-tv-plus/ Apple TV Plus doesn’t have as deep a movie library as Netflix or other streaming rivals. Still, it has stars like Tom Hanks, Denzel Washington and Bill Murray on board – and even picked up Oscars for the movie CODA and names for The Tragedy of Macbeth. Here’s a look at some of the real […]]]>

Apple TV Plus doesn’t have as deep a movie library as Netflix or other streaming rivals. Still, it has stars like Tom Hanks, Denzel Washington and Bill Murray on board – and even picked up Oscars for the movie CODA and names for The Tragedy of Macbeth.

Here’s a look at some of the real must-see movies on Apple TV Plus.

The good news is that if you’ve purchased an Apple product recently, you probably already have access to the streaming service for free. Here is a selection of the best films to date…

See also: Apple TV Plus: Everything you need to know about Apple’s streaming service | The 11 best shows on Apple TV Plus

Apple TV Plus

Really Smooth Cha Cha (2022)

Cooper Raiff directed this coming-of-age flick, and he stars in it as Andrew, an aimless 22-year-old college graduate who starts working as a party starter for bar and bat mitzvahs. He also meets and befriends an older woman, Domino (Dakota Johnson), and her daughter, Lola (Vanessa Burghardt). If you fancy a feel-good movie, this one delivers. It also won an audience award at the 2022 Sundance Film Festival.

Apple TV Plus

Fireball: Visitors from the Dark Worlds (2020)

This breathtaking documentary explores the cultural and scientific impacts of meteorites and craters on Earth. It’s complicated but compelling stuff. The film interviews the likes of Norwegian jazz guitarist Jon Larsen, who describes the feeling of holding a micrometeorite: “No human being has ever touched anything older. It’s really looking at eternity in the eyes.” One particular crater we see at the start of the film is absolutely stunning.

Apple TV Plus

This acclaimed coming-of-age film centers on 17-year-old Ruby, the only hearing member of a deaf family. After excelling in a choir class at her high school, she is torn between supporting her family’s fishing business and fully pursuing her passion for music. Featuring a standout performance from Emilia Jones, CODA (which stands for “Child of Deaf Adults”) is a touching tale that deserves a spot on this list. This is the Oscar for best film this year.

Apple TV Plus

A dazzling animated film from the team behind Song of the Sea, it’s the third installment in Tomm Moore’s “Irish folk trilogy”. It’s probably one of the best animated films of 2020, well deserving of an Oscar nomination against the giants of Disney and Pixar. Completely bewitching.

Apple TV Plus

You can read our full Finch review here, but long story short: we loved it! It’s often overly sentimental, with some sickening ‘life lessons’, but this post-apocalyptic tale of a lone survivor and a robot on a final road trip has real charm and is well worth watching. look at.

Apple TV Plus

The Tragedy of Macbeth (2021)

Joel Cohen of the Cohen Brothers filmmaking duo directs this adaptation of Shakespeare’s tragedy Macbeth, which garnered three Oscar nominations this year. Sure, a Shakespearean English-language movie might not be for everyone, but the feature is undeniably gorgeous, and Denzel Washington, Frances McDormand, and Alex Hassell deliver powerful performances.

Apple TV Plus

The Year the Earth Changed (2021)

Nature heals. No, really – it’s not about those ironic crocodile memes from early 2020 floating on pool noodles or cats ride a baggage carousel. When humans abandoned cities, parks, oceans and many other places during the 2020 COVID shutdowns, all kinds of wild creatures took advantage. Narrated by the legendary David Attenborough, The Year Earth Changed shows that we owe whales, penguins, cheetahs and a host of other animals to interfere less with their lives.

Billie Eilish: The World’s a Bit Blurry (2021)

This raw, behind-the-scenes music documentary gives you a glimpse into the life of singer-songwriter Billie Eilish, from her breakthrough hit Ocean Eyes to recording the James Bond theme No Time to Die. In the candid film, Eilish faces the pressures of touring, directing music videos, and writing and recording her hit album When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?

AppleTV

It’s a little light on the subject, but The Banker, a biopic of Bernard Garrett – an enterprising black business owner who hired a white person to be the face of his business to circumvent racist attitudes – is worth at least a deviation. .

Who are you Charlie Brown? (2021)

If you’re a Charlie Brown fan, let’s face it, who isn’t? — this informative, family-friendly documentary will blow your mind (and you won’t even have to go for an unfortunate football kick). Narrated by Lupita Nyong’o, Who Are You, Charlie Brown? is a sweet short that explores the appeal and origins of the classic cartoon character. But I’ll stop going on like wah, wah, wah. Watch this one now.

Apple TV Plus

It’s easy to forget that Justin Timberlake is an accomplished actor, but Palmer will absolutely remind you of that. Playing an ex-con stumbling through the life of a young boy, Palmer is hardly groundbreaking, but he is carried by Timberlake’s central performance. Prepare for tears.

Apple

A fantastic documentary directed by Bryce Dallas Howard about what it was like to be a father in those days. Touching, well done. A must see, especially for parents.

AppleTV

Here We Are: Notes for Living on Planet Earth (2020)

It’s more of an animated short than a movie, but given the subject matter (and the fact that Apple TV Plus doesn’t have many movies), we’re adding it. Here We Are: Notes for Living on Planet Earth is beautiful, heartwarming, and perfect for families with young children.

Apple TV Plus

Starring Tom Hanks as the Commander of the United States Navy, Greyhound was well received upon release and – unlike most modern films – is skinny with a running time of 90 minutes. Tense, well-acted and produced, and Oscar-nominated for sound, Greyhound is perhaps one of the best films available on Apple TV Plus.

Apple TV Plus

On The Rocks reunites Sofia Coppola and Bill Murray for the first time since A Very Murray Christmas. It’s basically a father and daughter drama. It’s a bit more airy than Coppola’s usual work, but it seems to suit Murray, whose charming, world-weary performance elevates the whole project.

Apple

History of the Beastie Boys (2020)

Fight for your right to party with the Beastie Boys Mike Diamond (Mike D) and Adam Horovitz (Ad-Rock) as they tell the story of their music and 40 years of friendship with the late Adam Yauch ( MCA). This “live documentary experience” is directed by their longtime collaborator Spike Jonze as a fitting testament to these rap legends.

Apple

The coming-of-age story Hala tells a relatable story about the struggle to forge an identity, as a teenage girl balances her Muslim upbringing with her social life and high school identity.

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The End of Roe c. Wade, through the eyes of a North West filmmaker https://photobolsillo.com/the-end-of-roe-c-wade-through-the-eyes-of-a-north-west-filmmaker/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 22:51:08 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/the-end-of-roe-c-wade-through-the-eyes-of-a-north-west-filmmaker/ A still from the film “Our Bodies Our Doctors” by Oregon documentary filmmaker Jan Haaken. Jan Haaken Your browser does not support the audio element. Jan Haaken is no stranger to the fight for reproductive rights. She has been involved in the movement since the 1970s, when she worked at the Feminist Women’s Health Center […]]]>

A still from the film “Our Bodies Our Doctors” by Oregon documentary filmmaker Jan Haaken.

Jan Haaken

Jan Haaken is no stranger to the fight for reproductive rights. She has been involved in the movement since the 1970s, when she worked at the Feminist Women’s Health Center in Los Angeles while studying for her doctorate in psychology.

“My thesis was on the history of reproductive rights as they affected women’s opportunities to participate in civil society,” she said. “I became more struck by the importance of the whole issue of reproductive control.”

Roe v. Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court decision that upheld people’s right to abortion, was still new to his generation. Haaken said these experiences motivated her to advocate for reproductive rights throughout her career as an academic and filmmaker. She co-founded the Portland Reproductive Rights Committee in the late 1980s and has made several films focusing on reproductive freedom.

Today, Haaken is professor emeritus of psychology at Portland State University, but she continues her work as an activist and filmmaker. Her 2020 documentary film “Our Bodies Our Doctors” focuses on the current generation of doctors performing abortions in Oregon and Washington. The film goes inside the clinics and hospitals where abortion providers work, featuring candid conversations with medical staff and patients, and featuring rarely seen footage of abortions performed.

The film received the Best Documentary Award at the 42nd Portland International Film Festival in 2019.

In many ways, the film foreshadows our current moment. In it, many doctors talk about their concern about the growing number of state restrictions on abortion access and the future of abortion legality in America. With the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision last week overturning Roe v. Wade said abortion access in Oregon and Washington remains unchanged, but Haaken said it’s still a blow to reproductive rights and the people featured in his film.

“I think we all feel tremendous grief,” Haaken said, “but we also need to understand our history and learn from our history.”

Haaken recently sat down to speak with OPB Weekend Edition host John Notarianni.

John Notarianni: Much of this film is made up of very candid conversations with doctors who perform abortions, talking about how they feel about their work and its importance. One of the people you feature is Dr. Andrea Chiavarini. She lives here in Portland and in the film she talks about what she sees as the difference between abortion providers of her generation and an earlier generation. Here is that clip:

Andrea Chiavarini: “People who turned to abortion about a generation ago came from feminism and saw so many women suffering from illegal abortions. I know older providers were concerned that there wasn’t as much commitment to providing abortion services because my generation is the post-Roe generation and we haven’t seen this kind of thing happen .

Notaries: I mean, obviously that’s not the case anymore. But are his thoughts on that sound true to you?

Jan Haaken: We have included her statement reflecting this history because it is so important to understand what was at stake for the early activists in this field: for health care and abortion within health care. But, many young feminists after Roe v. Wade were not so struck by the importance of the abortion issue as central to a larger women’s rights agenda. I think there’s a lot of mobilization now, acknowledging that.

Notaries: Tell me a bit more about early abortion access and reproductive rights advocacy, and how you think advocates in recent years have missed the lessons of that.

Jan Haaken, professor emeritus of psychology at Portland State University and documentary filmmaker.

Jan Haaken, professor emeritus of psychology at Portland State University and documentary filmmaker.

Jan Haaken

haaken: During the era of abortion rights organizing in the 1960s and 1970s, the focus was on whether access to abortion was possible, based on your own assessment of your life and what you can handle. So this insistence, that women are in the best position to know whether they are in a situation where they can bear a child, that was a deeply important human right. Forcing a person to bear a child, to become a mother against their will, was a kind of fundamental violation of human rights.

I think in the beginning, the defense of abortion and the pro-choice movement was framed more in terms of choice. Many women had very narrow choices, especially poor women, marginalized women, and women of color. It wasn’t just a matter of being pro-choice, but many aspects of their lives, the complexity of their lives, were pushed aside.

Notaries: In the film, there are several scenes that depict abortions taking place.

Haaken: Yes, I think it’s the first documentary that does that.

Notaries: What do you think people come to understand when they see it, the procedure being performed? Why is this important?

Haaken: It was important because there is such mystification. I was first brought into short film projects by the research team at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, through the OB/GYN department. They were trying to reclaim visual culture in a way that was dominated by anti-abortion imagery: the bloody fetuses and gruesome images that are being circulated by anti-abortion groups. And to really reclaim the representation of abortion; that sometimes women feel sad about it, and there are tears, but there are also tears of relief, for the most part. We were really interested in demystifying what is happening and acknowledging the work of claimants despite the harassment they experience, including from their own profession, and including here in the North West.

Notaries: Yeah, and one of the things that struck me about the movie was this sense of threat that doctors were already experiencing here in the Pacific Northwest. There’s a scene with Lois Backus, the executive director of Medical Students for Choice. Here’s what she had to say:

Lois Backus: “I spent five years as an abortion clinic manager in rural central Pennsylvania. We had a few pickets at the clinic, but they were generally respectful. And remember: picketing is a constitutionally protected activity, which in itself isn’t scary. Then I went to Portland, Oregon. Oh my God. I was threatened. My house was picketed by people saying that the suppliers of abortion should be murdered. It’s a more confusing picture than you might think.

Notaries: They then point out that the overall risk, the overall threat is actually very low. But still, I think people think the Pacific Northwest is that place so safe and protected. I don’t know how many people understand the threat doctors have faced here before.

Haaken: Yeah, during the 1990s, a number of doctors and other providers were murdered. There have been incendiary bombings, including here in Oregon to Washington. Threats were fairly routine. The anti-abortion movement really moved away from those terrorist tactics to legislative tactics at the turn of this century, which, as we now know, they’ve won very many court cases at the local, state, and now to the Supreme Court. .

Notaries: I wonder if you’ve had a chance to speak with any of the vendors featured in the film since the Dobbs Decision Project leaked in early May? I wonder what they think of their practice.

Haaken: I spoke with two of the doctors featured in the film from Seattle. They are not surprised. And yet, it is a very sad day. Providers talked about death by 1,000 cuts. So the beginning with the Hyde Amendment, a few years after Roe v. Wade, and all the legislative restrictions that have restricted access in recent years. There has been a reduction in abortion from the very beginning.

But yet, there’s still something about that last dagger to Roe’s heart and what it represents as a dagger to the heart of women’s basic human rights. I think we all feel tremendous grief, but we also need to understand our history and learn from our history.

Notaries: Let me ask you about this: there are a lot of people who are feeling all kinds of emotions about this decision. But many people are upset, scared and uncertain. With your perspective on the story, for people who care about abortion access, what do you think the lesson should be?

Haaken: I think we should consider a variety of tactics that keep this issue in the public eye, through mass mobilization: for cases involving civil disobedience, defending people who face criminal charges, either as people seeking an abortion or as health care providers. We also need to focus on what makes it important to terminate a pregnancy at different stages of gestation, and not just rely on horror stories of incest, rape and those extreme cases.

I think a lot of people are unaware of the circumstances of women’s lives. Circumstances often change; people have stressful things happening. So I think confronting what that really means in people’s lives, to determine whether they’re going to have a child, is what we should be doing. And, considering a range of tactics.

Jan Haaken is professor emeritus of psychology at Portland State University, clinical psychologist, author and documentary filmmaker. You can find his film Our bodies Our doctors on major streaming services, including free from Kanopi using your Multnomah County Library Card.

Listen to Haaken’s full conversation with OPB Weekend Edition host John Notarianni using the audio player at the top of this page.

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A documentary visit to two century-old secular Jewish summer camps – People’s World https://photobolsillo.com/a-documentary-visit-to-two-century-old-secular-jewish-summer-camps-peoples-world/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 16:41:36 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/a-documentary-visit-to-two-century-old-secular-jewish-summer-camps-peoples-world/ Camp Kinderland’s communist sympathies were proudly displayed in this photo taken in August 1935. | Tamiment Library / NYU The new short documentary (2021) (32 min.) kinderland tells the story of two secular Jewish summer camps in upstate New York that cultivated social activists for nearly a century and still exist today. Both camps were […]]]>

Camp Kinderland’s communist sympathies were proudly displayed in this photo taken in August 1935. | Tamiment Library / NYU

The new short documentary (2021) (32 min.) kinderland tells the story of two secular Jewish summer camps in upstate New York that cultivated social activists for nearly a century and still exist today. Both camps were founded by secular working-class Jews on opposite sides of the left-wing political divide. Kinderland, founded in 1923, was communist; Kinder Ring, established in 1927 and sponsored by The Workmen’s Circle (recently renamed Workers Circle), socialist.

Already by the end of the 1920s, a bitter split in the Jewish labor movement had emerged, coinciding with the split in the global socialist movement. Judging from its public pronouncements, the WC (or Arbeter Ring, to use its Yiddish name), founded in 1900, hailed the overthrow of the Tsar in Russia, where many of its members hailed from. But the modern socialist democracy they envisioned did not take root in the new USSR. As Joseph Stalin consolidated his control over the Soviet Union and the global communist movement, WC joined the anti-communist opposition, while remaining within the socialist orbit.

Thousands of WC members, however, were brought in to support the world’s first socialist state, bleeding WC ranks and funding sources. If WC had its own internal system of fraternal benefits – schools, camps, educational courses for adults and secular Sunday schools for children, choirs, theater companies, insurance, health care, burial grounds, etc. – the new fugitives from the organization established the International Labor Order, allying with groups from other national and ethnic groups, to offer a similar package. Within the IWO, the Jewish section has always been by far the largest. IWO fell victim to McCarthyism in the 1950s.

The two groups shared many commonalities, movements that both drew inspiration from Karl Marx and a widespread awareness of class struggle. Their respective children’s summer camps occupied an area on opposite sides of Lake Sylvan in Dutchess County, NY. Stories of mutual contempt are legendary, with socialist children tossing around the epithet “Stalinist!” and the children of Kinderland answering: “Bourgeois fascists! of their canoes turning in the middle of the lake. Although beyond the quarrels, there are also stories of secret teenage romances.

The film is titled after Kinderland, although historically it’s almost impossible to talk about one without the other in contrast. The documentary balances film footage and interviews fairly evenly between the two ideological camps.

In almost a century, the missions of the two seaside resorts for children have drifted. Kinderland no longer identifies with the Communist movement per se, nor organizationally with the Communist Party, to which many parents belonged in the past. However, it is still oriented towards bold social activism and has become much more internationalist, with a large interracial population, although still formally Jewish in inspiration.

Kinder Ring began as a WC camp for the children of their working-class Jewish members, but over time, and with the specter of anti-communism haunting America, it has increasingly come to reflect the suburban, assimilated, patriotic mindset of their now third-generation American parents, best recalling their radical roots in nostalgia and song.

Both camps still remain largely secular, and although Kinderland emphasizes primarily social activism, Kinder Ring continues with its middle-class, more apolitical approach, the use of Yiddish, or a smattering of it. in any case, replacing the class consciousness of the past. WC, along with many other prominent “socialist” allies in the 1960s, for example, supported American intervention in Vietnam because of their staunch anti-communism.

The role of Yiddish on both sides reflects a much greater place for Yiddish in contemporary American life, perhaps even in the world. On the one hand, affinity for Yiddish does not compel Jews to declare themselves loyalists to the modern state of Israel, which has adopted Hebrew as its language and deprecated Yiddish as its language of exile. And at the same time, with its rich traditions in literature, folk culture, song, humour, history, the love for Yiddish shows that there are other ways of affirming Jewishness than being forced into the opportunistic commemoration of Jewishness. Holocaust and the Cult of the Israeli Golden Calf.

Director Amy Grapell filmed kinderland mostly between 2017 and 2019, although it includes clips of some people, such as centenarian Fanny Jacobson, who died in 2015, and others who have since died. Others interviewed include Dr. Barney Zumoff, Robert Kaplan, Maddy Simon, Michael Meeropol, a number of camp counselors and many children. The film’s time period takes us to a summer when WC visitors traveled to Kinderland to learn from the affectionately nicknamed “Commie Camp” how to engage children in more socially engaged ideas and projects, how to make their experience more fundamental to children. kinds of Kinderland hopes they will become later in life.

Bunk 4 girls salute in August 1935. | Tamiment Library / NYU

Ben Bath, a teacher and singing leader then working for WC, appears in the film noticing the resurgence of fascism and asking what kind of society will we be? A youth from Kinderland is asked about the values ​​taught and assimilated there: “Ending capitalism is a big question,” he says, as the song “Joe Hill” is heard.

Scenes from Kinder Ring depict a more standard apolitical summer camp that’s more about competitive sports and middle-class success, the comfortable lives of what American Jews contemptuously called “alrightniks,” people who had began to “succeed” in America. It’s hard to see how summers spent at KR would lead young people to lives of nonconforming protest.

McCarthyism wreaked havoc, more on Kinderland than on the anti-communist WC Kinder Ring camp. Columnists recalled that during the height of the crackdown, officers from the county sheriff’s department monitored the road leading to the camp and noted the license plate numbers of arriving cars. Camp enrollment dropped for a few years until the terror passed.

There is a kind of “well-being” canvas laid on this short documentary: Ah, the two former warring camps have finally reconciled, and the old ones can leave in peace knowing that their labors have not been in vain. For an unassuming film of modest proportions, that’s fine, but the core issues after decades of estrangement have by no means been resolved. The contradiction is always between two cultures, one of acceptance of the established order, the other of resistance; reformism versus revolution. At least they talk to each other. By entitling his film after only one of the two camps, Grapell seems to be giving him the hand.

kinderland is currently on the documentary film circuit.

(The author was director of the Southern California District of Workers Circle/Arbeter Ring from 1995 to 2011, and personally knew many of the people interviewed in the film.)


DONOR

Eric A. Gordon


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‘Reddit’ Where to Watch ‘Lightyear’ (2022) Free Online Streaming at ~ Home https://photobolsillo.com/reddit-where-to-watch-lightyear-2022-free-online-streaming-at-home/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 04:17:54 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/reddit-where-to-watch-lightyear-2022-free-online-streaming-at-home/ Look now: lightyear full movie online freeThe immense popularity of Pixar’s Toy Story film series began when the first installment was released in 1995. Since its inception, the Toy Story films have garnered 11 Oscar nominations, and Toy Story 3 was one of only three animated films to have achieved a Best Picture nomination – […]]]>
Look now: lightyear full movie online freeThe immense popularity of Pixar’s Toy Story film series began when the first installment was released in 1995. Since its inception, the Toy Story films have garnered 11 Oscar nominations, and Toy Story 3 was one of only three animated films to have achieved a Best Picture nomination – the other films were Beauty and the Beast and Up. Toy Story 3 was also the first animated film to earn $1 billion at the box office.

The last time Toy Story fans saw their favorite characters was in 2019’s Toy Story 4 movie. Since then, many fans of the show’s favorite space ranger rejoiced when Lightyear was announced in December. 2020. Despite the return of Buzz Lightyear, Chris Evans replaced Tim Allen in the voice role. Marvel Cinematic Universe fans, in particular, can’t wait to hear Captain America as the space ranger.

So without wasting any more time, if you’re looking to figure out how to watch Lightyear and unravel that origin story, you’ve come to the right place – keep reading.

“Lightyear” release date

“Lightyear” hits theaters exclusively on June 17, 2022, before hitting Disney+ and home video at a later date.

Where to stream Lightyear online

There’s only one place this movie will go after the theatrical release. It’s all about Disney+.

Lightyear is a Pixar movie. All other Pixar movies went to Disney+ after theatrical release. In fact, many movies headed straight to Disney+ when they hit theaters. It was a response to the pandemic issue with movie theaters closing, but it’s also because it proved to be financially viable for Pixar.

This movie is not going straight to Disney+. As it is an IMAX broadcast, it will be exclusive to theaters for a while. It’s not yet known when it will be heading to Disney+. Disney+ hasn’t been entirely consistent with movie release dates on the streaming platform.

The film was banned in the United Arab Emirates. There is a moment where two female characters kiss, so the UAE chose to ban the film. It probably won’t come to the Disney+ platform either.

lightyear free online

Will ‘Lightyear’ be released on Netflix?

Netflix has a large library of anime movies and TV shows. But the original story of the charming astronaut won’t make it to the streaming juggernaut.

Will ‘Lightyear’ be released on Amazon Prime Video?

The answer to this question is similar to the first. No, the film isn’t coming to Prime Video anytime soon.

Is Lightyear streaming on Disney+?

Lightyear hits theaters on June 17 to give fans the long-awaited story behind the iconic character. For those who prefer watching movies from the comfort of their own home, Lightyear will eventually be available to stream on Disney+. Lightyear could follow in Encanto’s footsteps and release on Disney+ 30 days after its theatrical premiere date. So Disney+ subscribers could watch Lightyear as early as mid-July.

Conversely, Lightyear could follow the typical 45-day theatrical release format, in which case it would arrive on Disney+ in early August. If fans remain impatient for Lightyear, they can check out Beyond Infinity: Buzz and the Journey to Lightyear on Disney+ in the meantime. This newly released documentary explores the creative process of Buzz Lightyear’s transition from toy to human.

Is “Lightyear” airing on HBO Max?

“Lightyear” is created by Pixar, and Disney does not license its new movies to other streaming services. It will therefore not be available on any other streaming service like Netflix, HBO Max, Amazon or Hulu.

Lightyear (2022) online in the United States?

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There are several ways to watch Lightyear online in the United States. You can use a streaming service such as Netflix, Hulu, or Amazon Prime Video. You can also rent or buy the movie on iTunes or Google Play. You can also watch it on demand or on a streaming app available on your TV or streaming device if you have cable.

What is Pixar’s Lightyear about?

Lightyear tells the origin story of a young astronaut named Buzz Lightyear – the inspiration behind Andy’s eponymous figure. Buzz, along with his commander and crew, are marooned on a hostile planet over 4.2 million light-years from Earth. The crew must work together to find their way home, but not without Zurg’s familiar villain causing trouble. Lightyear introduces several new faces to Toy Story fans, like the adorable robot cat friend named Sox.

In addition to Evans joining the voice cast, stars like Keke Palmer, Taika Waititi and James Brolin also lend their voices to Lightyear. A Buzz Lightyear movie has already been attempted with the forgettable 2000 direct-to-video movie Star Command’s Buzz Lightyear: The Adventure Begins – a pilot of Star Command’s short-lived Buzz Lightyear spin-off series. However, the hopes for success of the next film are higher than those of its predecessors.

Who is part of the cast of Lightyear?

Besides Evans, Keke Palmer (Scream Queens), Dale Soules (Orange Is the New Black) and Taika Waititi (Jojo Rabbit) have also been announced as part of the cast, lending their voices to other ambitious Star Command recruits. The voice cast also includes Uzo Aduba, James Brolin, Mary McDonald-Lewis, Efren Ramirez, Peter Sohn and Isiah Whitlock Jr. Bonus: Check out this featurette where the cast talks about what Buzz Lightyear means to them:

Captain America himself, Chris Evans, will voice the film’s titular Space Ranger. Although Tim Allen voiced Buzz Lightyear in the first four Toy Story films and continued to voice him in much of his related media, MacLane, who coincidentally directed Allen in the 2011 Toy Story short film Small Fry and the 2013 TV special Toy Story of Terror!, says the following about this new cast:

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Home Movies – Create your own personal movie library https://photobolsillo.com/home-movies-create-your-own-personal-movie-library/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 20:18:31 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/home-movies-create-your-own-personal-movie-library/ By Christian Chensvold That week in June 1988, I graduated from Santa Rosa High School and the next morning embarked on my first solo road trip to the underworld of Los Angeles. I left for five days and I only remember two things. I spent the first day in Santa Barbara and decided to save […]]]>

By Christian Chensvold

That week in June 1988, I graduated from Santa Rosa High School and the next morning embarked on my first solo road trip to the underworld of Los Angeles. I left for five days and I only remember two things.

I spent the first day in Santa Barbara and decided to save some money by sleeping on the beach. The sand tortured my back, while the sand fleas tortured the rest of me, and the sound of the waves almost drove me crazy. I finally gave up at 4 a.m., and there, on a dark and desolate 101 road, I remember looking at the stars shining above the sea and feeling a strange sense of destiny, as if I was on a hero’s journey to discover an important piece. in the puzzle of my life. Looking back on all these years later, what I discovered on my trip is clear, because it’s the only other thing I can remember.

I found a movie.

Walking around Hollywood two days later I found a single screen movie theater showing Alan Rudolph The Moderns, which is set in the Parisian art world of the 1920s. It’s an original gem with a fantastic cast – it’s also a favorite of more than one person affiliated with this newspaper – and I walked out of the theater with the film poster, the vinyl album and an intoxicating on the magic of cinema. Already suspecting that my soul belonged to the past, The Moderns gave a 1.21 gigawatt bolt to my inner time machine, and I’ve watched it many times since, always finding something new in it, especially in the wake of growing maturity and slingshots and arrows of the twists of life.

The past few years have been euphemistically referred to as “difficult times” and I have tried to share my own coping strategies with cover stories in this article about escapism and using ancient wisdom teachings to create your own reality. And here I am with another, pleading to cut the cord from your streaming services and build your own Alexandria library of your top 100 movies of all time, and just watch them.

Think about it: could you really name more than a hundred movies that have left a lasting mark on your soul, that have made you the person you are today, that have been so many cornerstones of the castle of the imagination that you have slowly built up over your lifetime? Plunging ourselves in exhaustion into a chaotic underworld of endless possibilities suggests a lack of self-awareness, as if we really don’t know ourselves at all.

A hundred films seem like enough good stories for a lifetime.

* * *

They say you never get over your first love, and upon close inspection, I would dare say that most of the movies I watch over and over relate to one of the first three stages of life. To childhood belong things like The sound of music and the star wars and the IndianaJones films, while in adolescence belong the Back to the future series and Romanticize the stone. Then, starting with The Modernsto young adulthood belongs the realm of world-building, classic and foreign films and historical escapism, with Francis Ford Coppola Dracula and Martin Scorsese The age of innocence on top. So either I just like revisiting old favorites, or movies from the last 25 years just aren’t as good as they used to be. If it’s the latter, why torture yourself with perpetual disappointment?

Science has shed some light on the matter with the Baskin-Robbins Theory of Happiness, which goes like this. If you stop someone on a hot summer day and offer them ice cream, they invariably respond, “I’d love some ice cream!” They choose from the three you offer – vanilla, chocolate and strawberry – and glide into a good mood that can last all day. But give people 31 flavors to choose from, and it turns out they’re not too happy with the ice cream they stumbled upon. This is because a specific part of the brain is activated: the area associated with the emotional response known as regret. Choosing the wrong ice cream – or the wrong movie to watch – descends into the mind realm of roads not taken, haunted by the refrain “If only…..”

Before I realized what I was doing, I started by eliminating streaming services like Netflix and Amazon Prime. I started noticing that when faced with endless choices, all lined up for me, I invariably clicked on something that looked interesting, watched it for 15 minutes, then tried something else, leaving my recently viewed list with five times as many abandoned movies as movies I’ve finished, let alone enjoyed. Then there was the homepage interface itself, which I’ve come to think of as some kind of devil-designed casino. I started going for two well-chosen DVDs a week in an effort to make watching movies feel special again. But things really took a turn when I bought a $5 VHS player at the thrift store and loaded up some 25 cent video tapes.

According to our esteemed editor and filmmaker Daedalus Howell, the video comes to your eyes in a series of waves. This probably explains why the old tapes looked more engrossing than contemporary Blu-ray movies shot digitally, without even being released on film, let alone transferred from film to video. These hazy videotapes seemed to unfold more like dreams, much like classic Old Hollywood storytelling is filmed and edited in a way that feels like turning the pages of a picture book, with your imagination as co -author of what you live. Research has shown that modern fast-cut, shaky cinema bypasses the imaginative part of the brain while stimulating the visual cortex, the part used for something like watching dazzling but meaningless fireworks. If all the entertainment you consume is done this way, then you’re literally making yourself dumber by blunting the most important ability you have.

* * *

If you can still enjoy – in fact, increasing enjoyment – watching certain movies over and over again, what does that tell us about human nature, and why we put up with so much self-imposed mediocrity? And not just in the stories we watch – the ancients had myths revealing timeless truths, we have “entertainment” that makes profit – but in our lives themselves. I feel like asking my late grandmother why she saved the right dishes for special occasions, instead of eating her finery every day? Good God, grandma, carpe diem. What if you were knocked down by a bus tomorrow, waking up at the pearly gates hoping to get in, and Saint Peter’s first question is, “You based your life on things you knew were second order, and you expect to enter paradise?”

In the middle of writing this little meditation, I bought a copy of The Moderns, and I can’t wait to put it on the shelf with the other 99 films comprising the story of a man’s life in cinema and what he learned about himself. I think the next one will be Visconti’s 1963 epic, The leopardstarring Burt Lancaster as an Italian prince watching the world change around him, but unable to change his spots.

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‘Moon Over Buffalo’ on stage at FSLT https://photobolsillo.com/moon-over-buffalo-on-stage-at-fslt/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 06:11:21 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/moon-over-buffalo-on-stage-at-fslt/ June 12 (Sunday) Sidewalk Sale — 10am-6pm June 12-13, Museum Store at Crystal Bridges Museum. FREE ENTRANCE. 657-2335 or crystalbridges.org. Mountain Street Stage — Tacie & The Sunshine Band, 2 p.m., Event Center at the Fayetteville Public Library. Free. Register at faylib.org. ‘Moon Over Buffalo’ – Ken Ludwig’s door-slamming prank returns to the Fort Smith […]]]>

June 12 (Sunday)

Sidewalk Sale — 10am-6pm June 12-13, Museum Store at Crystal Bridges Museum. FREE ENTRANCE. 657-2335 or crystalbridges.org.

Mountain Street Stage — Tacie & The Sunshine Band, 2 p.m., Event Center at the Fayetteville Public Library. Free. Register at faylib.org.

‘Moon Over Buffalo’ – Ken Ludwig’s door-slamming prank returns to the Fort Smith Little Theater, 2 p.m. June 12; 7:30 p.m. from June 15 to 18. $12. fslt.org or 783-2966.

‘Miss You Like Hell’ – When a smart and deeply imaginative teenager agrees to go on a road trip with her free-spirited Latina mother, neither can imagine where it will take them, by the co-creator of ‘ In the Heights,” through July 10, TheatreSquared in Fayetteville. $15 to $61. theatre2.org.

Statehood Day — With Kelly Houston-Jones, assistant professor of history at Arkansas Tech University, 2 p.m., Headquarters House Museum in Fayetteville. Free. E-mail [email protected]

Youth Pride — Community Art Project with Olivia Trimble, 3-5 p.m., Pink House Alchemy, 928 N. College Ave., Fayetteville. theequalitycrew.org.

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June 13 (Monday)

Walk-in Tour: Collection Highlights — 11:30 a.m. Monday, Thursday and Sunday, 2 p.m. Saturday, Garrison Lobby at Crystal Bridges Museum. Free. 657-2335 or crystalbridges.org.

Book Talk – “The Picture of Dorian Gray” by Oscar Wilde, 1 p.m., Fayetteville Public Library. Free. Register at faylib.org.

Walk-in Tour: Architecture — 1 p.m. Monday, Thursday, Sunday, Garrison Lobby at Crystal Bridges Museum. Free. 657-2335 or crystalbridges.org.

Not Your Mama’s Romance Book Club – “The Friend Zone” by Abby Jimenez, 5 p.m., Bella Vista Public Library. Free. bvpl.org.

Yoga at FPL — 6 p.m., Fayetteville Public Library. Free. Register at faylib.org.

Film & Discussion – “Tang’s Asian Market”, 6 p.m., Fayetteville Public Library. Free. Register at faylib.org.

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June 14 (Tuesday)

Tuesdays with Mr. Troy – 10 a.m. Family Gathering Glade at the Fayetteville Public Library. Free. faylib.org.

First Edition Book Club – “Conjure Women” by Afia Atakora, 6 p.m., Bentonville Public Library. Free. bentonvillelibrary.org.

Books and beers – “In five years” by Rebecca Serle, 6 p.m., El Sol Mexican restaurant in Fayetteville. Hosted by Fayetteville Public Library. Free. Register at faylib.org.

NWA Playwrights Festival — Begins at 6:45 p.m. June 14; last show at 3 p.m. June 19, Ozark Mountain Smokehouse, 1725 S. Smokehouse Trail in Fayetteville. Organized by Smokehouse Players and Arkansas Playwrights Workshop. Free; donations to Magdalene Serenity House. No reserved places. Doors open one hour before the curtain. E-mail [email protected]

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June 15 (Wednesday)

Walk-in Tour: Big Picture — Art, Architecture and Nature, 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, Garrison Lobby at the Crystal Bridges Museum. Free. 657-2335 or crystalbridges.org.

3 in 30 — Three works in 30 minutes, 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, Garrison Lobby at Crystal Bridges Museum. Free. 657-2335 or crystalbridges.org.

Wild For Wednesday – Super Science Steve, 1:30 p.m., Fayetteville Public Library. Free. faylib.org.

Puzzle — 3 p.m., Bella Vista Public Library. Free. bvpl.org.

Mystery Book Club — 4 p.m., Bella Vista Public Library. Free. bvpl.org.

Clay Pottery Class — With Esteban Cabeza de Baca and Heidi Howard, 6 p.m., Lobby Gallery at Momentary in Bentonville. $15 to $30. Sign up at themomentary.org.

History of Pride and the LGBTQ+ Equality Movement – ​​Presented by Michael Bennet-Spears, 6:30 p.m., Shiloh Museum of Ozark History in Springdale. theequalitycrew.org.

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June 16 (Thursday)

Book Lovers Club — 10 a.m.-noon, Fort Smith Main Library. Free. fortsmithlibrary.org.

CB To You Mobile Art Lab — 10am-3pm, Tahlequah Public Library (Okla.). Free. 657-2335 or crystalbridges.org.

We’re Addicted — Knit and Crochet Club, 1 p.m., Bella Vista Public Library. Free. bvpl.org.

Virtual Author Chat — With RL Stine, 3 p.m., Rogers Public Library. Free. rogerspubliclibrary.org.

“Redoubt” — A film by Matthew Barney, 4 p.m., Fermentation Hall at The Momentary in Bentonville. Free. Reservations at themomentary.org.

Mindfulness Meditation — 5:30 p.m., Fayetteville Public Library. Free. faylib.org.

CB To You Mobile Art Lab — Creative Writing Workshop, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Tahlequah Public Library (Okla.). Free. 657-2335 or crystalbridges.org.

Cocktail Tour — 6-7:30 p.m., Bachman-Wilson House at Crystal Bridges Museum. $20. 657-2335 or crystalbridges.org.

Black Film Showcase — 6-10 p.m., Grand Hall at Crystal Bridges Museum. Free. Reservations at 657-2335 or crystalbridges.org.

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June 17 (Friday)

Walk-in Tour — Sculpture, 1 p.m., Garrison Hall at Crystal Bridges Museum. Free. 657-2335 or crystalbridges.org.

Family Movie Matinee — 2 p.m., Bentonville Public Library. Free. bentonvillelibrary.org.

Summer Family Movies — “Pirates!” Band of Misfits,” 2 p.m., Fayetteville Public Library. Free. faylib.org.

Walker Landing Nights – “The Muppet Movie,” 6 p.m., Walker Landing at the Crystal Bridges Museum. Free. 657-2335 or crystalbridges.org.

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June 18 (Saturday)

Music with Laura Doherty — 10 a.m., Springdale Public Library. Free. springdalelibrary.org.

Super Saturday – Music by Will Parker, 10 a.m., Fayetteville Public Library. Free. faylib.org.

Meditation and Art — 10:30 a.m., Contemporary Art Gallery at Crystal Bridges Museum. $5. 657-2335 or crystalbridges.org.

NWA Pride Festival – 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Dickson Street and West Avenue in Fayetteville. nwapride.org.

CB To You Mobile Art Lab – 11am-5pm, NWA Pride Parade & Festival, Dickson Streetb in Fayetteville. Free. 657-2335 or crystalbridges.org.

Trans March — Noon, along Dickson Street in Fayetteville. nwapride.org.

Summer Reading Beach Bash — Featuring musician Will Parker, 2 p.m., Bella Vista Public Library Garden. Free. bvpl.org.

Celebrate Juneteenth — With a visit from Harriet Tubman, 2 p.m., Bentonville Public Library. Free. bentonvillelibrary.org.

18th Annual NWA Pride Parade – 5 p.m. along Dickson Street in Fayetteville. nwapride.org.

Forest Concert Series – The Sound of Freedom with Ricky Wade and Genine LaTrice Perez, 7 p.m., North Forest at Crystal Bridges Museum. $12. Reservations at 657-2335 or crystalbridges.org.

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June 19 (Sunday)

Dip! Movies — “Pirates of the Caribbean,” 1 p.m., Rogers Public Library. Free. rogerspubliclibrary.org.

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On display

“Let’s Talk: Art of the West” — June 18-Sept. 12, Early American Gallery at the Crystal Bridges Museum. Free; no ticket required. 657-2335 or crystalbridges.org.

Private Lessons – For four to 10 people, including pinch pot, troll head night light, polymer clay creatures, clay bunny, clay dog ​​or cat, and large mouth clay creature, $25 per person and up, Terra Studios in Durham. 643-3185 or using art.org.

“Creative Minds in the Ozarks” – Featuring works by Roy Harris (folk art wood carver), Elsie Mistie Sterling (draughtsman and painter), and Henry Tribble (wood marker), through July 9, Rogers Historical Museum . Free. 621-1154.

“The Dirty South” — Exploration of “Southern Landscape” themes — both natural and man-made; “Sinners and Saints”, a religious and spiritual exploration; as well as “Black Corporality”, or the black body in terms of its tradition and knowledge, until July 25, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville. $12. 657-2335 or crystalbridges.org.

“QUEER” — An Exploration of LGBTQIA+ Identity, through July 30, Fenix ​​Arts, 150 W. Skyline Drive in Fayetteville. Free. 530-6023, fenixarts.org.

‘A Divided Landscape’ — European American artists painted a version of the world they wanted others to see. What was left behind – the footprints, the fences, the military trenches, the deeds, the handshakes, the broken treaties and the blood – tells a darker and more accurate story, until September 25, The Momentary in Bentonville. Free. themomentary.org.

“Ken Smith’s Buffalo River Country” – Remembering the Creation of the National River, through December, Shiloh Museum of Ozark History in Springdale. Free. 750-8165 or shilohmuseum.org.

“Digi Know” – A photography exhibit that illustrates a time when a photo was a precious thing and shows visitors how historic photos are digitized to preserve these stories of our people and our past, all summer long, Shiloh Museum of Ozark History in Springdale. Free. shilohmuseum.org.

“Math Moves! Experiencing Ratio and Proportion” — Lets kids and families “playfully investigate ratios and proportions using their bodies and gestures,” year-round Scott Family Amazeum in Bentonville. $10. amazeum.org.

— Becca Martin-Brown

[email protected]

‘Moon Over Buffalo’ – Ken Ludwig’s door-slamming farce returns to the Fort Smith Little Theater, 2 p.m. June 12; 7:30 p.m. from June 15 to 18. $12. fslt.org or 783-2966.
Photo ‘Moon Over Buffalo’ – Ken Ludwig’s door-slamming farce returns to the Fort Smith Little Theater, 2 p.m. June 12; 7:30 p.m. from June 15 to 18. $12. fslt.org or 783-2966.
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Best things to do in Miami this weekend June 10-12, 2022 https://photobolsillo.com/best-things-to-do-in-miami-this-weekend-june-10-12-2022/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 01:57:27 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/best-things-to-do-in-miami-this-weekend-june-10-12-2022/ friday june 10 It’s time to deck yourself out in your lewd best Pride once again. Pride of Wynwood It may be a few years old, but it’s already cemented its status as June’s must-attend event. This year’s musical lineup includes performances by Marina (FKA Marina and the Diamonds), Azealia Banks, Cupcakke and Slayyyter. Also […]]]>

friday june 10

It’s time to deck yourself out in your lewd best Pride once again. Pride of Wynwood It may be a few years old, but it’s already cemented its status as June’s must-attend event. This year’s musical lineup includes performances by Marina (FKA Marina and the Diamonds), Azealia Banks, Cupcakke and Slayyyter. Also on the bill, drag performances by Rupaul’s Drag Race winner Violet Chachki and fan favorite Gottmilk. The music festival takes place over two days, with a neighborhood takeover on Sunday as local businesses host special LGBTQ+ programming. 5 p.m. to 3 a.m. Friday and 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at the RC Cola Factory, 550 NW 24th St., Miami; www.wynwoodpride.com. Tickets cost between $50 and $150 through tixr.com. Ashley-Anna Aboreden

If you have fond memories of watching the laser light shows at the old Miami Science Museum near Vizcaya, you’ll be happy to hear that just because the museum got bigger and digged better, the shows continue. In fact, now you can make it a Friday night when the Phillip and Patricia Frost Museum of Science hosts Laser Party. The planetarium has scheduled five consecutive shows, starting with the Symphony of the Stars at 7 p.m., with presentations focusing on Jimi Hendrix, Prince, Radiohead and Pink Floyd. The wall to follow all evening. 7 p.m. Friday, at the Philip and Patricia Frost Museum of Science, 1101 Biscayne Blvd., Miami; 305-434-9600; frostscience.org. Tickets cost $8 to $10 per show. Sophia Medina

Not that you need an excuse for perreobut now you can perreo for a cause. On Saturday, the Florida Latina Institute for Reproductive Justice hosts A Perreo Combativo at Club Tipico Dominicano. The event deploys the Afro-Latin dance of perreo as a form of resistance, as a way to defend reproductive rights. Those wishing to attend need only show proof of donation to one or more of the following organizations: Florida Access Network, Women’s Emergency Network, Southern Birth Justice Network and Las Mingas de Aborto. You can also donate through Eventbrite. 7 p.m. Friday at Club Típico Dominicano, 1344 NW 36th St.; 305-634-7819; clubtipicodominicano.com. Admission is free with a donation, via eventbrite.com. Ashley-Anna Aboreden

On Friday, the Blue Note Jazz Festival continues its residency at the North Beach Bandshell with a performance by jazz-fusion pianist and composer Robert Glasper. Blue Note brought Glasper to the bandshell for a pair of performances last summer. He returns to close the series with special guests Ledisi and Bilal. Glasper won four Grammys and eight nominations as well as an Emmy for the song “Letter to the Free” with Common and Karriem Riggins for Ava DuVernay’s documentary 13th. 8 p.m. Friday at the North Beach Bandshell, 7275 Collins Ave., Miami Beach; 305-672-5202; northbeachbandshell.com. Tickets cost between $55 and $85. Jose D. Duran

Click to enlarge

Kurtis Conner at the Broward Center for the Performing Arts: See Saturday

Photo courtesy of Outback Presents

Saturday June 11

Through the use of videos, a show of glowing vintage glassware and other elements, Cara Despain explores the development of nuclear weapons in “Spectrum,” Bass’ last exhibition. The show highlights how common domestic uranium was before nuclear weapons, the muted history of uranium testing and mining, and the constant specter of nuclear war. Through historical context, “Spectre” serves as a haunting reminder of dark history and the hidden injustice buried in the legacy of the Cold War. Originally from Salt Lake City, Despain lives and works in Miami. His work is part of the Rubell Museum, the Scholl Collection, and the Miami-Dade County and Miami International Airport Art Collections. Noon-5 p.m. Saturday through Sept. 18 at The Bass, 2100 Collins Ave., Miami Beach; 305-673-7530; thebass.org. Tickets cost from $8 to $15. Ashley-Anna Aboreden

The Goombai Festival makes its long-awaited return to celebrate Bahamian culture. The queen of this year’s festival is Bahamian-born US Representative Frederica Wilson. The party includes performances by Mr. Julien and DJ Selector Chronic. In addition to the music, there will be junkanoo performances, as well as vendors serving authentic Bahamian cuisine. 1 to 8 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, at Elizabeth Virrick Park, 3255 Plaza St., Coconut Grove; miamigov.com. Free entry. Sophia Medina

If you are unfamiliar with YouTuber and Podcaster Kurtis Conner, you are probably of a certain age and this event is probably not for you. But for Gen Z and millennials on the cusp, Conner is one of the funniest people on the internet. The Canadian comedian’s delivery tends to be very dry, and he’s made quite a career commenting on internet culture. On Saturday, Conner is stopping by the Broward Center for the Performing Arts as part of his 2022 tour. Hopefully he still finds time to post content on YouTube. 7 p.m. Saturday, at the Broward Center for the Performing Arts, 201 SW Fifth Ave., Fort Lauderdale; 954-462-0222; browardcenter.org. Tickets cost between $40 and $75 through ticketmaster.com. Jose D. Duran

Click to enlarge Cuban Classical Ballet of Miami at Miami-Dade County Auditorium: See Saturday - PHOTO COURTESY OF CUBAN CLASSICAL BALLET OF MIAMI

Miami Cuban Classical Ballet at the Miami-Dade County Auditorium: See Saturday

Photo courtesy of the Cuban Classical Ballet of Miami

Swifties report to Gramps on Saturday for cruel summer, a dance party inspired by Taylor Swift. Guests are invited to sing and dance on the dance floor as they listen to hits like “22”, “Trouble” and “Shake It Off”. The event is produced by Le Petite Fete, the Orlando-based party promoter that regularly hosts dance parties featuring Swift, Harry Styles, Britney Spears, Olivia Rodrigo and the like. 7 p.m. Saturday, at Gramps, 176 NW 24th St., Miami; 855-732-8992; gramps.com. Tickets are $20 through eventbrite.com. Sophia Medina

On Saturday, attend the Cuban Classical Ballet of Miami’s presentation of The Corsair Suite. The local ballet company will showcase excerpts from one of the most evocative classical ballets of the 19th century. The show is a libretto based on Lord Byron’s poem “Le Corsaire” and was originally choreographed by Joseph Mazilier to music by Adolphe Adam in Paris in 1856. The ballet is full of sultans, maidens, princesses and of pirates, that is to say: Prepare for a visual delight. 8 p.m. Saturday at the Miami-Dade County Auditorium, 2901 W. Flagler St.; 305-547-5414; miamidadecountyauditorium.org. Tickets are $35-$65 through ticketmaster.com. Ashley-Anna Aboreden

Sunday June 12

On Sunday, O Cinema South Beach Screens Fan-Favorite Tim Burton Film beetle juice in partnership with the Wolfsonian-FIU. The 1988 fantasy comedy film stars Winona Ryder, Geena Davis, Alec Baldwin, Catherine O’Hara and Michael Keaton. The film, which was a critical and commercial success, has become a cult classic. After the screening, stay for a discussion on the topic of the “haunted house” and how it has become a mechanism through which we view the interior spaces of society. 4 p.m. Sunday, at O ​​Cinema South Beach, 1130 Washington Ave., Miami Beach; 786-471-3269; o-cinema.org. Tickets cost between $7.50 and $11. Ashley-Anna Aboreden

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Todd Phillips Gives Fans The Joker 2 Update They’ve Been Craving https://photobolsillo.com/todd-phillips-gives-fans-the-joker-2-update-theyve-been-craving/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 00:58:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/todd-phillips-gives-fans-the-joker-2-update-theyve-been-craving/ In an Instagram post shared by Todd Phillips on June 7, the sequel to the film will be titled “Joker: Folie à Deux.” It looks like the possible final draft of the script was completed on May 18, and it was co-written by Phillips and Scott Silver — the same writing duo on 2019’s “Joker.” […]]]>

In an Instagram post shared by Todd Phillips on June 7, the sequel to the film will be titled “Joker: Folie à Deux.” It looks like the possible final draft of the script was completed on May 18, and it was co-written by Phillips and Scott Silver — the same writing duo on 2019’s “Joker.” The “Old School” director also shared a photo of Joaquin Phoenix reading the script in what appears to be an apartment or office. The photo not only confirms that Phoenix is ​​on board for the sequel, which is officially moving forward.

The title is intriguing. According to the National Library of Medicine, “folie à deux” literally translates from French as “folie pour deux” and is generally defined as “an identical or similar mental disorder affecting two or more people, usually members of a close family”. . To say this title is on the clown’s nose is an understatement. Since Arthur comes to believe he’s Thomas Wayne’s biological son — which Wayne himself rejects before his death — during the events of “Joker,” that could ultimately mean two different things. Will the film be about the making of Bruce Wayne and how his drive to bring his parents’ killer to justice obsesses him as deeply as Fleck’s desire to make others laugh? Or, could Harley Quinn, who started her life as a right-arrow psychiatrist until she fell in love with Joker and became his right-hand man, be introduced to the movie universe?

It should be noted that at the time of writing, no other information has been shared, including additional confirmation of new cast members, a release date, or a filming start date.

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Spelling Grayslake makes it to the Scripps National Spelling Bee finals https://photobolsillo.com/spelling-grayslake-makes-it-to-the-scripps-national-spelling-bee-finals/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 10:33:17 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/spelling-grayslake-makes-it-to-the-scripps-national-spelling-bee-finals/ Grayslake Spelling Sahasrad Sathish was among 13 finalists who competed in the Scripps National Spelling Bee final on Thursday. Just minutes into the eighth round, Sahasrad, or “Speller No. 1,” was knocked out after he was unable to spell “cypsela” correctly. He finished tied for 9th out of 234 spells. Hearing Chief Justice Mary Brooks […]]]>

Grayslake Spelling Sahasrad Sathish was among 13 finalists who competed in the Scripps National Spelling Bee final on Thursday.

Just minutes into the eighth round, Sahasrad, or “Speller No. 1,” was knocked out after he was unable to spell “cypsela” correctly. He finished tied for 9th out of 234 spells.

Hearing Chief Justice Mary Brooks ring the fateful bell signaling he had made a mistake was a huge disappointment for the avid 13-year-old reader. Brooks acknowledged that this was Sahasrad’s last year of eligibility to compete in the Bee and offered a few words of encouragement.

“I feel like you’re just designed to be successful everywhere. So get out there and do great things and know how very, very proud of you we are,” she said.

After leaving the stage, Sahasrad spoke with Bee host LeVar Burton about his experience during the competition.

“It was really great,” Sahasrad said. “I was introduced to a lot of new spellings and it was great socializing with them.”

Sahasrad’s parents were there to console him after the blow of the loss.

“We were expecting a lot. He was really upset,” his mother Vidhya Ramachandran said on Friday.


        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

Still, it was a notable achievement for the Lake Forest Country Day School eighth-grader, as no other Illinois spellers made it to the finals.

In the previous seven rounds, Sahasrad correctly spelled giallolino, beekeeping, paleiform, robenhausian, and augean, and gave the correct meanings of the words kleptocrat and plebeian.

Sahasrad finished tied for 21st in last year’s virtual bee semi-final. This year held its first in-person National Bee in Washington, D.C.

Access to voting

The Illinois State Board of Elections has launched a remotely accessible mail-in voting system for the June 28 primary election to allow voters who are blind, deafblind and others with disabilities to vote privately and independently.

These voters can securely receive and mark their ballots electronically at home instead of having to travel to vote at polling stations.

Blind and deafblind voters generally cannot read or mark ballots without the assistance of a sighted person. The new system will allow those voters to use their own screen reader technology, which expresses the digital content or displays it on a Braille device, to mark their ballots.

This system will also help voters who have hand disabilities that prevent them from marking ballots with pens.

The state’s 108 local election authorities must provide voters with disabilities with an accessible option to vote by mail beginning with the November general election, according to new state law.

The registration period for postal voting is now open. Voters who want to use the new system should contact their county clerk or other election authority.

The Gail Borden Public Library in Elgin is offering special programs and a ‘Celebrating the Rainbow’ photography and art exhibit on the second floor of the main library to ‘educate, inform and enlighten’ patrons about the month pride.
– Courtesy of Gail Borden Public Library


Celebrate Pride Month

Pride Month commemorates the 1969 Stonewall Riots in Manhattan.

Across the country, parades, workshops, celebrations, concerts and rallies for civil rights and in support of the LGBTQIA community are taking place to raise awareness throughout the month of June.

The Gail Borden Public Library in Elgin offers special programs and a ‘Celebrating the Rainbow in Photography and Art’ exhibit on the second floor of the Main Library to ‘educate, inform and enlighten’.

“(It’s) about education and engagement, but it’s also about celebrating each other,” spokeswoman Denise Raleigh said.

The work of four local artists — three from Elgin and one from South Elgin — is represented in the exhibit. For more information, visit gailborden.info/pride.

In previous years, the library has had smaller pride displays, but the idea for this year’s display came from a staff member and all departments of the library got involved, Raleigh said. .

A green screen area has been set up where people can have their picture taken with a Pride flag background and the images will be displayed on a monitor. Here are the library’s Pride Month educational programs for adults:

•Rainbow 101: An LGBTQIA+ Primer — Check out the LGBTQIA+ rainbow of gender expression, sexual orientation, and pride flags at 2 p.m. on June 12. To register, go to gailborden.info/register.

• Pride Movie Matinee — Screening of LGBTQIA+ genre films at 1:30 p.m. on June 19, followed by a discussion. Register at gailborden.info/register.


Indian Trails Public Library Digital and Creative Services Librarian Heidi Estrada, left, has been named a 2022 Library Journal Mover and Shaker.  Estrada and Sophie Kenney, right, work together to develop the library worker group BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, people of color) Reaching Across Illinois System (RAILS).

Indian Trails Public Library Digital and Creative Services Librarian Heidi Estrada, left, has been named a 2022 Library Journal Mover and Shaker. Estrada and Sophie Kenney, right, work together to develop the library worker group BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, people of color) Reaching Across Illinois System (RAILS).
– Courtesy of Indian Trails Public Library


Change Agents

Heidi Estrada, digital and creative services librarian at Wheeling-based Indian Trails Public Library, has been named a 2022 Library Journal Mover and Shaker.

Estrada is working as a co-lead with Sophie Kenney to develop the Reaching Across Illinois System (RAILS) library worker group BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, people of color).

With over 70 members, the group’s goal is to foster connection, share resources and experiences in a safe, welcoming and open space for BIPOC library workers. Kenney founded the band in late 2020.

Together, the duo works to build community, support group members, and provide professional development and networking. The group is currently developing a mentoring program and a series of legal/labour/human resources webinars. It was recently presented at the Public Library Association conference.

Muslim scholarship

Each year, the Islamic Society of North America awards several need-based scholarships to students for academic achievement, community development work, and other factors.

To be eligible, students must be: a U.S. citizen or permanent resident; enrolled in an accredited US college/university; and Muslim students actively engaged in the community.

To apply for the academic year beginning this fall, visit isna.awardspring.com.

Fight censorship

The Chicago-based American Library Association and a coalition of more than 25 national groups are uniting to empower communities to fight censorship.

The association has launched a Unite Against Book Bans campaign aimed at raising awareness of the recent increase in book-related challenges in public libraries and schools.

The majority of book bans target racially and LGBTQ-themed titles.

ALA’s Office for Intellectual Freedom tracked 729 challenges to materials and services from libraries, schools, and universities, resulting in more than 1,597 challenges or removals of individual books in 2021. comes in the highest number of attempted book bans since the ALA began tracking it 30 years ago. from.

• Share stories, news and happenings from the Suburban Mosaic at mkrishnamurthy@dailyherald.com.

]]> Travel Light – NoHo Arts District https://photobolsillo.com/travel-light-noho-arts-district/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 20:14:24 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/travel-light-noho-arts-district/ through the film Traveling Light. feature film To pack light opens at the Laemmle Theatre, North Hollywood on Friday, June 10. Indie stalwart Xenon Pictures has announced that To pack lightthe latest film from British director Bernard Rose (Candyman, Beloved Immortal, Ivan’s XTC), will open Friday, June 10 at the Laemmle Theater right here in […]]]>

through the film Traveling Light.

feature film To pack light opens at the Laemmle Theatre, North Hollywood on Friday, June 10.

Indie stalwart Xenon Pictures has announced that To pack lightthe latest film from British director Bernard Rose (Candyman, Beloved Immortal, Ivan’s XTC), will open Friday, June 10 at the Laemmle Theater right here in the NoHo Arts District.

Bernard Rose and part of the cast will attend the evening screening of To pack light on Saturday, June 11 and participate in a post-screening Q&A moderated by Xenon CEO and one of the film’s executive producers, S. Leigh Savidge

The Laemmle run follows the film’s soft launch as part of American Cinematheque’s Beyondfest late last fall.

Starring an ensemble cast including Danny Huston, Stephen Dorff, Tony Todd, Oliva D’Abo and Matthew Jacobs, the film examines a day in the life of a black Uber driver (Todd) who, while searching for her son, homeless at the onset of Covid-19, finds himself transporting a group of truth seekers to a Hollywood Hills house where a mysterious guru (Huston) holds court. In time, the isolation caused by the pandemic – or the perceived freedom from it – turns into madness. Meanwhile, news of the horrific murder of George Floyd resonates throughout the city as the social fabric crumbles and we realize we are witnessing the end of an era… Funny and scary at the same time, Traveling Light is a Bunuelian satire of middle-class life in Los Angeles. Angeles at a time of extreme crisis.

Tickets are available here: https://www.laemmle.com/film/traveling-light

Savidge of Xenon commented that:

“…the film examines the collision course between the thought processes of the haves and have-nots during one of the most trying times in Los Angeles’ long history. Bernard Rose captures Los Angeles in a way that many may know but few have seen.

American Cinematheque programmer Grant Moninger called the film “

“…Dark and hilarious. Bernard Rose has created one of the best films of the year.

The soundtrack features Bulgarian singer/songwriter Ivo Demchev, whose performances were acclaimed in the new yorker as “sliding effortlessly between masculine and feminine modes; his vocal register is just as protean, going from a low baritone to a soprano embellished with theremin vibratos.

The score was composed by Rose and cellist Jen Kuhn.

Xenon plans to roll out the film to select theaters across the country over the summer with a digital release slated for October.

To pack light The main cast

Tony Todd

The feature film Traveling Light opens at the Laemmle Theater in North Hollywood on Friday, June 10.
Tony Todd via the film Traveling Light.

Perhaps best known for his chilling performance as “Candyman,” charismatic actor Tony Todd has consistently delivered compelling performances since his fantasy film debut. Somnambulism (1986). Todd’s many credits illustrate his versatility. They include movie classics such as The rock (1996), The crow (1994), lean on me (1989), Bird (1988), night of the living dead (1990), Final destination (2000), the film by Oliver Stone, multiple Oscar winner Section (1986) and The secret (2000), which was nominated and screened at the Cannes Film Festival.

Danny Huston

The feature film Traveling Light opens at the Laemmle Theater in North Hollywood on Friday, June 10.
Danny Huston via the film Traveling Light.

Award-winning actor, screenwriter and director Danny Huston is known for his versatility and dramatic screen presence. Most recognized for roles in films like Martin Scorsese the aviatorby Alphonse Cuaron children of men and Alejandro Inarritu 21 grams, Huston worked with some of the finest film directors of his generation. He could recently be seen in the Netflix feature IO opposite Anthony Mackie, as well as the feature film Stan and Ollie, directed by Jon Baird for BBC Films. Additionally, Huston starred in and directed the feature film The last Picture (2017), which was released on September 6, 2019.

Stephen Dorf

The feature film Traveling Light opens at the Laemmle Theater in North Hollywood on Friday, June 10.
Stephen Dorff via the film Traveling Light.

Stephen Dorff was chosen from over 2,000 young men from around the world when he auditioned for and won the coveted role of “PK” in John G. Avildsen. The strength of one (1992) in 1992, with Morgan Freeman, John Gielgud and Fay Masterson. For his performance, he received the Male Star of Tomorrow Award from the National Association of Theater Owners. Dorff went on to amass an impressive list of screen credits, chief among which is New Line’s Blade (1998), in which he co-starred with Wesley Snipes and won “Best Villain” at the MTV Movie and Blockbuster Entertainment Awards. Dorff was recently chosen for the Chainsaw Massacre prequel Leatherface (2017) and the fantasy family film Albion: The Ascent of the Dannan (2016).

Olivia d’Abo

The feature film Traveling Light opens at the Laemmle Theater in North Hollywood on Friday, June 10.
Olivia d’Abo via the film Traveling Light.

Olivia d’Abo is an English actress and singer from London. She made her debut as a teenager in 1984 and remained active through the following decades. Her most famous role was as the free-spirited Karen Arnold in the historical television series The good years (1988 -1993). From 2002 to 2008, d’Abo played criminal mastermind Nicole Wallace in police procedural Law & Order: criminal intent (2001-2011). From 2008 to 2009, d’Abo played Jedi Master Luminara Unduli in the anime series Star Wars: The Clone Wars (2008-2020). In 2019, d’Abo voiced Luminara Unduli again, in a cameo role in the live-action film Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker. She continued to work regularly in film and television. D’Abo had lasting appeal.

About Xenon Images

Founded in 1986, Xenon Pictures, Inc. is one of the oldest continuously operating motion picture distribution companies in the United States. Long associated with ethnic content and niche marketing, Xenon acquires around 25 titles a year to add to an evergreen library, a few of which are positioned for theatrical release. Besides its decades-long association with Rudy Ray Moore (AKA Dolemite), the company is known for developing Straight Outta Compton which earned founder S. Leigh Savidge an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Screenplay.


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