Commercial photographer – Photo Bolsillo http://photobolsillo.com/ Tue, 07 Sep 2021 19:03:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://photobolsillo.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Commercial photographer – Photo Bolsillo http://photobolsillo.com/ 32 32 How Martine Gutierrez transformed into Cleopatra, Mulan, and other historical heroines for a public art project in bus shelters in the United States https://photobolsillo.com/how-martine-gutierrez-transformed-into-cleopatra-mulan-and-other-historical-heroines-for-a-public-art-project-in-bus-shelters-in-the-united-states/ https://photobolsillo.com/how-martine-gutierrez-transformed-into-cleopatra-mulan-and-other-historical-heroines-for-a-public-art-project-in-bus-shelters-in-the-united-states/#respond Tue, 07 Sep 2021 16:03:12 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/how-martine-gutierrez-transformed-into-cleopatra-mulan-and-other-historical-heroines-for-a-public-art-project-in-bus-shelters-in-the-united-states/ Artist Martine Gutierrez was just a locked door from Madonna – the icon she’d love to photograph more than anyone – as the Queen of Pop performed for a pride celebration at Manhattan’s Boom Boom club Room. Gutierrez had a ticket, but was late to photograph a shoot for Maintenance magazine. When finally she arrived […]]]>

Artist Martine Gutierrez was just a locked door from Madonna – the icon she’d love to photograph more than anyone – as the Queen of Pop performed for a pride celebration at Manhattan’s Boom Boom club Room. Gutierrez had a ticket, but was late to photograph a shoot for Maintenance magazine. When finally she arrived carrying a bouquet of roses, she told the ruthless bouncer that she needed to give the flowers to Madonna. The bouncer, however, was too preoccupied with all the frantic fans banging, pulling hair, and clawing to reach their queen,

Gutierrez and his friends gave up and took refuge on the nearby piers. “Instead, we took the roses out of the Hudson River and made wishes on what we want from New York,” she told Artnet News. The compromise helped the artist to feel as if she had met her icon. “Getting to know Madonna in person someday,” if Gutierrez could ever photograph her, “would shatter my ideal for who she is, and that would be healthy for me,” she said. Gutierrez has learned that capturing iconic characters in the flesh is often less interesting than conquering their mythology from within.

The elegant and mysterious photographs of the multifaceted artist, of which she is both the subject and the photographer, have recently made featured appearances at the Venice Biennale, the Ljubljana Graphic Arts Biennale, the Hayward Gallery London and the Australian Center. for Photography.

Now, “Anti-Icon, “ Gutierrez’s new multi-city exhibition in the streets of New York, Chicago and Boston transfers his play between gaze and muse into the public domain. For a series of photographs bordering 300 bus shelters, organized by the Public Art Fund, the artist from Brooklyn reconstructs 10 historical or mythological female icons.

Martine Gutiérrez, Cleopatra (2021). Courtesy of the artist.

“We know an icon like Madonna in all her forms, but no one thinks of Aphrodite or Cleopatra as a child or an elderly person,” Gutierrez said. “Once it’s all burned down, we’ll always come back to mythology because we need it to make sense of our lives – that annotation of storytelling is bigger than the internet.”

Gutierrez, who is 32, shot her renditions of Cleopatra, Mulan, Queen of Sheba, Atargatis, Gabriel, Aphrodite, Lady Godiva, Helen of Troy, Queen Elizabeth I and Judith last summer at her mother’s house in northern L New York State. There had been a drought that season, undermining the vitality of the usually lush landscape in a way that mirrored the effect of the pandemic on Gutierrez’s own creative mind. But after looking for inspiration in mythology, she realized that she too could challenge the limits of her surroundings. The empty swimming pool, where she had previously moved a mattress to create her own private bedroom, became her studio, while the materials she found around the house turned into her accessories. Then she clicked on the timer.

Gutierrez initially envisioned the 10 icons wearing garish costumes; one idea was even to create a series of fake perfume advertisements for a fictitious perfume called Anti-Icon. “But it was wrong to do something decorated during times of scarcity,” she said. Instead, tarp cuts became Helen’s dress, inspired by 1960s Italy, and she hides her sultry expression in the photo behind a veil of birdnet. Meanwhile, the peonies Aphrodite catches to hide her breasts come from a surplus from Gutierrez’s mother’s garden. Mulan’s body shield is made of plaster, while gauze, mud, sticks, trash bags, cardboard, and zippers replace Elizabeth’s crown, Gabriel’s wings, and other markers. of the female divinity.

Martine Gutierrez, (2021), Boston. Courtesy of the artist and RYAN LEE Gallery.

When we met in downtown Brooklyn last month to visit some of the images of the shelters, which appear in JCDecaux advertising spaces, Gutierrez donned a pair of Grave robber– shorts, a short shirt and earthy sandals. “Don’t I look like Lara Croft today?” ” she asked.

Seeing his Aphrodite in a Clinton Hill bus shelter, Gutierrez shouted, “Oh my god, she’s gorgeous!”

The woman in the photo and the artist standing next to her looked very different, I noted. Gutierrez agreed, “It’s not me in there.”

The awe-inspiring femininity of the trans body in the image contrasted sharply with the advertisement for Clint Eastwood’s new western crying macho at the opposite end of the shelter, this is why tThe business context for this work is so appropriate. Beyond their brilliance, the meticulously constructed images deconstruct female sexuality and challenge the male gaze by default, while entering a space reserved for commercial beauty. For Martinez, the attire of fame is also a personal pain: “When I was younger I thought if I was famous people would finally accept me,” she said.

Born to a Guatemalan father and a white American mother in California, Gutierrez has gradually shifted to a female identity over the years. Her practice has continually reflected this self-construction both as a woman and as an artist through works that combine her creative DIY spirit with an innate need for self-discovery. In Girlfriends (2014), his own image blends into frames with dummies that look alike; for Native woman (2018), she stars in a 124-page fictional fashion magazine about Indigenous identity and dress. The polished veneers of the images disguise the found objects and the unconventional backgrounds within them as they orchestrate illusions of both fact and fiction.

“There’s nothing you see that isn’t true, as long as that’s what you want to see,” Gutierrez said.

The artist considers the exhibition of curator Ralph Rugoff for the Venice Biennale 2019 as a turning point in his career. It was also a time when she felt physically beautiful. Italians kept calling her Monica Bellucci, whose style in the 2000 drama Malena ended up becoming an inspiration to her Helen. “Being a beautiful woman cuts you off in wealth and class – you may be broke, but people will be careful,” she said. “Men think I am there for them, and becoming an object is a feeling of corruption. ”

Martine Gutiérrez, Godiva (2021). Courtesy of the artist.

Beauty, as she learned by doing “Anti-Icon, can also be triggering. The public presence of the photographs forced her to take each image with her body parts strategically covered. “They’re still nudes, but different types,” Gutierrez said. She avoids using the word “censorship”, preferring to “conceal” or “reveal” for a little more mystery.

“If Madonna had a penis, she would definitely show it to everyone,” she said with a laugh. (The queen of pop is infamous Sex 1992 book was in the artist’s mood board for the project.)

Posing for a man’s lens, however, is an experience Gutierrez eschews. “I would criticize myself to a degree of self-intimidation,” she said. On the other hand, Gutierrez’s own relationship with the use of the camera is still ongoing. She positions her body and her expressions in a suggestive way, somewhere between performance and acting.

“I’m not yet self-aware enough to control my expressions,” the artist said. The experience has taught her to try to forget the goal and the timer, and she examines the results to find the moments of authenticity.

This month, another vision of Gutierrez will appear in public when the Whitney opens his commission of the artist’s work for its series of billboards in front of the High Line. This time, Gutierrez is pictured looking away from the lens, dressed in colorful clothing with native motifs and surrounded by collages of nature images. Like its other juxtapositions, the scene features a hyper-stylized version of what might pass for an advertisement – the billboard is perched above Manhattan’s chic Meatpacking District – as well as an overly performative presentation of a culture, presumably for the default white gaze.

“I developed a sense of empowerment and confidence with the security of not having to trade my qualifications for the sake of collection or relevance,” she said. “By traveling the world so intuitively, I want to be able to do something only on my own terms. ”

“Martine Gutierrez: Anti-Icon” is on view until November 21, 2021.

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National law enforcement organizations in https://photobolsillo.com/national-law-enforcement-organizations-in/ https://photobolsillo.com/national-law-enforcement-organizations-in/#respond Fri, 27 Aug 2021 20:20:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/national-law-enforcement-organizations-in/ Washington, DC, Aug.27, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – As crime escalates and tensions persist, America’s largest and most powerful law enforcement groups are calling for the help with a national weekend focused on dialogue, collaboration, solutions and reconciliation. WHAT: Press conference with national law enforcement organizations announcing Faith & Blue National Weekend 2021 (Faith & Blue). […]]]>

Washington, DC, Aug.27, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – As crime escalates and tensions persist, America’s largest and most powerful law enforcement groups are calling for the help with a national weekend focused on dialogue, collaboration, solutions and reconciliation.

WHAT:

Press conference with national law enforcement organizations announcing Faith & Blue National Weekend 2021 (Faith & Blue). Participants and other law enforcement officials will be available for interviews immediately following the event.

WHEN:

Tuesday, August 31, 2021, 11 a.m. ET – 12 p.m. ET

Doors open for media arrival and photographer installation / multi-box plug-in at 9.15am. Crews must plan to arrive no later than 10:00 am.

Space is limited. RSVP to media@faithandblue.org

OR:

National Law Enforcement Museum, 444 E Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

WHO:

  • Fraternal Order of Police – Patrick Yoes, National President
  • Association of Spanish American Police Command Officers – Chief Don Tijerina, Past President
  • International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators – Chief Pat Ogden, National President
  • International Association of Chiefs of Police – Chief Steve Casstevens, Past President
  • Association of Heads of Large Cities – Baltimore County Chief Melissa Hyatt, HR Committee Chair
  • Sheriffs of the main counties of America – Sheriff Peter Koutoujian, President
  • National Association of Women Law Enforcement Executives – Ms. Kym Craven, Executive Director
  • National Association of Black Police – Lieutenant Willie Williams, National President
  • National Association of District Attorneys – The deputy. Billy West, National President
  • National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Officials – Lynda Williams, Past President
  • Federal Association of Law Enforcement Officers – Matt Silverman, National Executive Vice President
  • National Sheriffs Association – Jonathan Thompson, Managing Director and CEO
  • MovementForward, Inc. – Reverend Markel Hutchins, Principal Organizer and CEO, National Faith & Blue Weekend, an initiative of MovementForward, Inc.
  • FirstNet, built with AT&T – Former Atlanta Police Chief George Turner, Consultant
  • Motorola Solutions Foundation – Jack Molloy, Board Member, Motorola Solutions Foundation and Executive Vice President of Products, Sales and Services, Motorola Solutions

WHY:

The mission of the National Faith & Blue Weekend (Faith & Blue), October 8-11, 2021, is to work for safer, stronger, more just and unified communities by directly facilitating collaborations between law enforcement officers. order and residents through the connections of houses of worship.

Faith & Blue aims to recalibrate police-community relations in the United States through solution-oriented activities co-hosted by faith-based organizations and law enforcement professionals that can be conducted in person, socially and / or or virtually. These events include forums and town halls, marches / marches for peace and unity, picnics, sporting events, vigils and other activities that foster an environment of problem solving, resolution and reconciliation.

The organizers of the National Faith & Blue Weekend represent every major national law enforcement group and every religious tradition in the United States of America. This unprecedented effort is co-hosted by the OneCOP initiative of MovementForward, Inc. and the Office of Community Policing Services (COPS) of the United States Department of Justice. The effort is the most consolidated police-community engagement project in history. Faith & Blue is sponsored by FirstNet, Built with AT&T and the Motorola Solutions Foundation.

For more information, visit National Faith & Blue Weekend at www.faithandblue.org or connect with us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. #FaithandBlue

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Community article: gener8tor Art organizes a virtual showcase for the 2021 cohort https://photobolsillo.com/community-article-gener8tor-art-organizes-a-virtual-showcase-for-the-2021-cohort/ https://photobolsillo.com/community-article-gener8tor-art-organizes-a-virtual-showcase-for-the-2021-cohort/#respond Thu, 26 Aug 2021 03:18:13 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/community-article-gener8tor-art-organizes-a-virtual-showcase-for-the-2021-cohort/ workshop visit; digital strategies for artists; and how to write an artist statement. gener8tor Art is also running an Art Collector Education Series for new collectors, with topics ranging from the art market to how to buy works of art from auction houses. You can register for future webinars on the gener8tor Art website. Alumni […]]]>

workshop visit; digital strategies for artists; and how to write an artist statement. gener8tor Art is also running an Art Collector Education Series for new collectors, with topics ranging from the art market to how to buy works of art from auction houses. You can register for future webinars on the gener8tor Art website.

Alumni of the gener8tor Art Accelerator Program include Ben Balcom, Brent Budsberg and Shana McCaw, Tyanna Buie, Sydney G. James, Le’Andra LeSeur, Dakota Mace, Open Kitchen and Ariana Vaeth. In addition to working towards the success of the next steps in their artistic careers, all former artists are working or have completed long-term projects as part of their experience with gener8tor Art.

gener8tor Art is made possible with the support of the American Family Institute for Corporate and Social Impact.

Artist Profiles

Phoenix Brown uses painting, printmaking, and drawing to highlight dialogues around black feminism, personal storytelling, and pop culture. She uses various mediums and fabrication methods to confront the representation of nature, still life and the body of black women in the history of Western art.

Jessica Harvey uses photography, video, sound, archival resources and objects constructed from everyday materials to create images and installations focused on memory and place, with particular emphasis on the role of women in personal or family histories. Through humor and tragedy, Harvey creates a new way of reevaluating life, death and the mythology of our own history.

LaNia Sproles uses printmaking, drawing and collage to combine philosophies of self-perception, queer and feminist theories, and inherent racial dogmas. Her work focuses on the black female body as a place of trauma and compromised autonomy, while the characters in her work act as a reclamation of space as a queer person of color.

Hope Wang specializes in weaving, screen printing, painting and photography to create trompe-l’oeil documentations of industrial labor sites, including eroded, redacted or disfigured building facades. Focusing on these architectural “scars”, Wang explores how people make complicated relationships with the structures of their daily lives.

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gener8tor is a turnkey platform for the creative economy that connects startups, entrepreneurs, artists, investors, universities and businesses. The gener8tor platform includes pre-accelerators, accelerators, corporate programming, conferences and scholarships focused on entrepreneurs, artists and musicians. gener8tor.com


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