Commercial photographer – Photo Bolsillo http://photobolsillo.com/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 21:09:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://photobolsillo.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Commercial photographer – Photo Bolsillo http://photobolsillo.com/ 32 32 Experiential learning launches careers and ‘permission to embrace the unknown’ https://photobolsillo.com/experiential-learning-launches-careers-and-permission-to-embrace-the-unknown/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 21:09:23 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/experiential-learning-launches-careers-and-permission-to-embrace-the-unknown/ Marcus Yam / Courtesy of the Los Angeles Times A military transport plane flies overhead as Afghans hoping to leave the country wait outside Kabul airport on August 23, 2021. Since the Taliban’s takeover of Afghanistan in the early As of August, more than 120,000 people have been airlifted out of Afghanistan in one of […]]]>

For those who love metrics and jargon, national higher education experts say students in activity-based programs score up to 20% better. If you’re looking for a slam dunk data point on the power of experiential learning, check out the 2022 Pulitzer Prize results.

The Los Angeles Times’ Marcus Yam has won major photo awards this year, including a Pulitzer Prize — a professional pinnacle like an Oscar in movies or an MVP in sports — with more danger. Yam’s Pulitzer-winning portfolio documented the chaotic US exit from Afghanistan, where the Taliban brutalized it.

A hands-on, transformative experience at Ohio University, Yam said, “gave me permission to embrace the unknown.” Yam remembers a year of immersion in the hamlet of Shade, Ohio. As a student at the School of Visual Communication, he drove a jeep into the unincorporated community south of Athens to compile his photographic essay for professors Terry Eiler and Stan Aalst.

“That experience at Shade laid the foundation for my career,” Yam said. “I felt like I was liberated. It gave me the confidence to go anywhere.

Born in Malaysia in 1984, Yam nearly dropped out of high school to get into sports gaming. He earned a degree in aerospace engineering from the University at Buffalo in 2006. When Yam migrated to photography, he was accepted in 2007 into a “boot camp” program at Ohio University designed for mid-career switches.

A globe-trotting writer and photojournalist, Yam’s 2022 awards included:

Since 1976, 84 alumni, students, and faculty have won or contributed to teams that have won at least 55 Pulitzer Prizes.

The student media experience prepared Matt Zapotosky, 2022 Pulitzer winner, BSJ ’08. “In many ways, I really learned to be a reporter at the Ohio University Post,” he said.

Zapotosky was part of the Washington Post team that won the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service for its coverage of the attack on the US Capitol on January 6, 2021.

Higher education experts have long touted the power of experiential learning across multiple disciplines, in addition to education based on “knowledge transfer”. Hands-on experience is especially relevant in communications careers, as employers want to see portfolios, published work, and highlight snippets.

A proud heritage

Chuck Scott, MSJ ’70, the Navy-trained photographer who co-founded what is now Ohio University’s School of Visual Communication, was an experience evangelist who launched hundreds of careers. May 9, 2022, when the Pulitzer Prizes were announced, was another milestone in this long legacy.

In a break from the norm, the Pulitzer Prize Board awarded two prizes for Breaking News Photography: Yam for poignant images from Afghanistan and Ohio University alumnus Drew Angerer, BSVC ’11, and his colleagues from Getty Images for coverage of the January 6 uprising.

Angerer recalls the inspiring resumes of professors at Ohio University.

“Between Pete Souza, Marcy Nighswander and Jenn Poggi – I had them all as instructors, and they had all worked in Washington at various times in their careers – it was definitely something I was interested in and wanted to try,” said said Angerer.

Photographer Amanda Voisard, BSVC ’02, was inside the Capitol on January 6, 2021; his work was part of the Washington Post’s Pulitzer package.

David Swanson, BSJ ’88, was a Pulitzer finalist for reportage photography with a Reuters photo team recognized for his climate change images. Swanson’s photo showed a fire train battling the Dixie Fire along tracks over a bridge in Plumas National Forest, California on July 15, 2021.

Swanson’s award-winning career — including 34 years at the Philadelphia Inquirer, where he was part of the team that won a Pulitzer Prize for Public Service in 2012 for a series about school violence — began on campus with an experience at the Post, taking pictures for the University and a job at Wilson’s Camera store on Court Street.

The Ohio University College of Communication was founded in 1968 by World War II correspondent John Wilhelm, a peer of journalist Walter Cronkite. As dean of the university, Wilhelm sent Ohio University journalists abroad for internships with top professionals.

One such foreign news intern was Laura Landro, BSJ ’76, who recalled the trajectory from Athens to an internship in London at McGraw-Hill World News, pointing her towards business journalism.

“I had barely passed Economics 101 in college,” Landro wrote in his 1998 book about surviving cancer. “Suddenly I found myself reporting on the oil industry, metal trading, nuclear power plants and petrochemical trading. Surprisingly, I found that I really liked it.

The sink or swim internship experience in London helped launch Landro’s award-winning 35-year career at the Wall Street Journal. Today, Landro is a benefactress of The Post, run by students at Ohio University, where she worked before her internship in London.

Experiential learning on media platforms is common. Ethan Sands, BSJ ’21, has worked at WOUB, The Post, and Southeast Ohio Magazine and also completed a podcasting internship in Washington, DC as part of the Scripps Semester in DC degree program.

After graduating in the spring of 2021, Sands completed a sports internship at the Los Angeles Times, worked for a USA Today Sports affiliate in Monroe, Louisiana, then joined MLB.com in April 2022 to cover the Braves. from Atlanta, visiting teams and minor league prospects.

“I wouldn’t be anywhere near where I am now without” hands-on experience, mentors and internships, he said.

The Scripps College of Communication sponsors hands-on learning in Washington, DC, Los Angeles, and New York. More than 60 Ohio University students have interned at the Miss Universe organization in New York, including Meg Omecene, BSJ ’16, who experienced crisis communications work in 2015 She was hired by the Miss Universe PR agency after graduation.

“Three years after graduation, I was hired to be the communications manager for Miss Universe,” said Omecene, now senior director of corporate communications at VISA.

After graduating this spring, Annie Fink, BSC ’22, joined a talent agency in Los Angeles. Fink, of Ashland, Ohio, “come comfortably” into her fast-paced job in Hollywood due to her college participation in the OHIO-in-LA program and faculty that enhanced her interview skills and resume. (over 350 students attended OHIO-in-LA). -LA in eight years). Additionally, Fink had experience at WOUB and the 48-Hour Shootout on campus.

Ohio University students gain campus experience at WOUB, The new policy, Variant Magazine, Southeast Ohio Magazine, The post office, Backdrop Magazine, Yarn MagazineBrick City Records and a national public relations chapter of the Public Relations Student Society of America.
Brick City Records is operated by students from the School of Media Arts and Studies who work with musicians to provide recording, promotion, distribution, publicity and concert booking services.

“Brick City gave me an experience that transferred directly into my day-to-day professional life in the music industry,” said Nashville songwriter-producer Marcus Meston, BSC ’17.

Ohio University’s award-winning speech and debate team helped launch lawyers, judges, and business leaders — and the voice of Bart Simpson, Nancy Cartwright. During her sophomore year at Ohio University, Cartwright placed fifth in the national competition with her speech “The Art of Animation”.

Premonitory experience.

As Bart would say, “You’re the smartest, you get it.”

About Ken Klein

An award-winning student journalist, Ken Klein earned a BSJ degree from Ohio University with a direct appreciation for experiential learning. He was associate editor of the independent student newspaper The Post (1975-1976) and interned at the Cincinnati Enquirer, the Palm Beach Post and the Associated Press in Tel Aviv. He is an Assistant Research Professor at Scripps College of Communication.

Klein worked for Gannett-owned News-Press in Fort Myers, Florida, and the Associated Press in Tallahassee, Florida, before joining US Senator Bob Graham’s staff in 1987 in Washington, DC. He was press officer, legislative director. , and chief of staff to Senator Graham, who has never lost a statewide election. In 2001, Klein joined the National Trade Association for Outdoor Advertising to lead federal industry advocacy. Widely published and quoted, Klein has also served as an expert witness on First Amendment issues. In 2021, the outdoor advertising industry inducted Klein into its Hall of Fame.

He was honored by the Director of the FBI (2011 Community Leadership Award) for building an innovative and effective public-private partnership to assist law enforcement. In 2019, Ohio University recognized Klein as an Outstanding Alumnus of the Federal Government, noting his long service on the Dean’s Advisory Council of the Scripps College of Communication, his efforts to build the university’s profile, and his support for interns at Ohio University in Washington, DC.

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Sam Gilliam, a painter revered for his colorful draped canvases, has died aged 88 https://photobolsillo.com/sam-gilliam-a-painter-revered-for-his-colorful-draped-canvases-has-died-aged-88/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 22:09:46 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/sam-gilliam-a-painter-revered-for-his-colorful-draped-canvases-has-died-aged-88/ Sam Gilliam, an abstractionist known primarily for his Drape paintings — unstretched canvases hung from ceilings and pinned to walls — as well as being the first black artist to represent the United States at the Venice Biennale, has died. Gilliam died on June 25, aged 88. The cause of death was kidney failure. His […]]]>

Sam Gilliam, an abstractionist known primarily for his Drape paintings — unstretched canvases hung from ceilings and pinned to walls — as well as being the first black artist to represent the United States at the Venice Biennale, has died. Gilliam died on June 25, aged 88. The cause of death was kidney failure. His death was announced by his New York gallery Pace, as well as his Los Angeles gallery David Kordansky.

The seventh of eight children, Gilliam was born in Tupelo, Mississippi in 1933, although the majority of his childhood was spent in Louisville, Kentucky. His father was a carpenter and railwayman and his mother was a teacher. Gilliam earned his BFA from the University of Louisville, followed by a brief stint as an army clerk in Japan, after which he returned to the University of Louisville for an MFA in painting, graduating in 1961. The following year, he and his first wife, Dorothy Butler, moved to Washington, D.C., where he had been offered a job at the Washington Post, becoming the publication’s first black reporter, and Gilliam took a job as an art teacher at a local high school. He will live and work in DC for the rest of his life.

Sam Giliam, Dual fusion1968, installation view, Dia:Beacon, Beacon, New York. ©Sam Giliam. Photo: Bill Jacobson Studio, New York, Courtesy of Dia Art Foundation, New York

Gilliam was painting in a predominantly figurative mode at the time, and later said his move towards abstraction came with the encouragement of the Washington Color School – a group of artists that included Kenneth Noland, Morris Louis, Thomas Downing and others. Downing in particular served as a mentor to the young artist, encouraging him to develop a looser and more fluid painting technique. Although he was never officially a member of the Washington Color School, he was often seen as the face of the movement’s second wave, according to a spokesman for David Kordansky..

It was during this time that Gilliam began the two works for which he is best known: his beveled and draped edge paintings. In 1967 he began Beveled Edge Paintings (also known as Slice Paintings) in which he dyed the raw canvas with fluidly applied acrylic paint before bending or creasing the material as the paint was still wet and then mounted him on a custom-made stretcher. beveled edge bars. In 1968 he began the Drape paintings – his most iconic series – in which he applied his paint in the same way, then removed the stretcher bars altogether, choosing instead to let his canvases hang fluidly from the wall or ceiling.

“My Drape paintings are never hung the same way twice,” said Gilliam The arts journal in 2018. “Composition is always present, but you have to let it happen, be open to improvisation, to spontaneity, to what happens in a space while you work.

Sam Giliam Courtesy of David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles, and Pace Gallery. Photography by Fredrik Nilsen Studio

In 1969, an exhibit at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in DC—now a branch of George Washington University called the Corcoran Gallery of Art and Design—featured a number of these Drape paintings, and the exhibit turned out to be the Gilliam’s big breakthrough, attracting wide attention. Three years later, in 1972, he became the first black artist to represent the United States at the Venice Biennale.

“No one could forget the 75ft piece Sam made for the American pavilion at the Venice Biennale in 1972. It stole the show that year and made a deep impression on all who saw it” , wrote Arne Glimcher, founder of Pace Gallery. on the occasion of Gilliam’s death. “Truly, it was impossible not to feel the audacity, grandeur and complexity of what Sam was trying to do. He explodes the boundaries between sculpture, painting and installation. He reinvented color and space in abstraction, and he hasn’t stopped since. It’s an exciting thing to see.

Sam Giliam, green april1969. Collection of the Kunstmuseum Basel, Basel, Switzerland. Courtesy of David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles and Pace Gallery. Photograph by Lee Thompson.

In the decades that followed, Gilliam continued to push himself and his medium, further struggling with the physicality of painting, although his commercial success came more slowly than that of other artists of his generation. This may have been the result of a racist system that systematically excluded artists of color; this may partly stem from his lack of desire to engage with the New York art world – Glimcher said that when he offered to exhibit Gilliam at Pace, the artist “explained that he had never wanted a strong engagement with a New York gallery” – or it may have been a combination of these. Later in life, however, he enjoyed a wave of success, with solo exhibitions at museums such as Dia:Beacon and Kunstmuseum Basel, and performance of Kordansky in Los Angeles from 2012 and Pace in New York. from 2019.

In 2017, he was again invited to exhibit at the Venice Biennale. “Everything that’s happening now – the immigration crisis, the bombings, the gutting of the National Endowment for the Arts, presidential corruption – was present in the 1970s. It seems worse now, but history, as art, is cyclical,” he said. art forum during installation. “Managing the cycles of history is art at its greatest capacity,” he added. “For me, art is about getting out of traditional ways of thinking. These are artists generating their own ways of working. We have to keep thinking about all of what art is, what it does. Although my work is not overtly political, I believe that art has the ability to draw attention to politics and remind us of this potential through its presence.

Sam Giliam, Seahorses1975, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia Photograph by Johansen Krause. Courtesy of the artist, David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles, and Pace Gallery

A great exhibition of his work, Sam Gilliam: full circle, is currently on display at the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C. through September 11. “For more than half a century, Sam Gilliam has modeled creative genius, artistic breakthroughs, and professional perseverance,” said Richard J. Powell, Duke University art historian and board member. Hirschhorn’s administration, in a statement.. “From his painterly interpretations of draped splendor to his evocative accumulations of pigment and color, he single-handedly reinvents painting. Sam Gilliam left an indelible mark on modernism.

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Can NFTs bring black archives into the future? – ARTnews.com https://photobolsillo.com/can-nfts-bring-black-archives-into-the-future-artnews-com/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 14:25:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/can-nfts-bring-black-archives-into-the-future-artnews-com/ The Obsidian collection aims to be Black’s Getty Images archive with a metaverse twist. The goal of the Obsidian collection, which was founded in 2017, is to build an expansive view of black history, past and present, while helping to create generational richness for the photographers and fields it works with. by offering both commercial […]]]>

The Obsidian collection aims to be Black’s Getty Images archive with a metaverse twist.

The goal of the Obsidian collection, which was founded in 2017, is to build an expansive view of black history, past and present, while helping to create generational richness for the photographers and fields it works with. by offering both commercial licenses and, now, NFTs. That means not only trying to seek out photographs from famous photographers like John Tweedle, who Obsidian worked with, but also trying to connect with people like Howard D. Simmons, a photographer who worked with the Chicago Sun-Times and Ebony.

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“A lot of times the images that mainstream institutions post have a pretty negative narrative, a lot of poverty and pain,” Angela Ford, executive director of the Obsidian Collection, said in an interview with ART news. “It’s not the sum total of our existence.”

Jointly celebrating Juneteenth and the NFT.NYC conference festivities, the Obsidian Collection this week announced a partnership with Lobus, an artists’ equity firm that developed its blockchain services. Their first outing together, a collection of 15 NFTs of John Tweedle’s photographs of Martin Luther King, Jr. during his visit to Chicago in 1966, premiered last Sunday.

For Ford, the advantage of NFTs lies in their potential to generate funding for artists.

“Decentralized technology allows all revenue generated today or in the future to go directly to the owners of these archives,” Ford said. “It gives the Diaspora the economic power as well as the healing power directly to these owners and their descendants. It’s empowering.

She also said that NFTs allow her to tap into a specific collector base, a point commonly made by space proponents.

“This technology also engages a powerful community,” said Lobus co-founder Lori Hotz, referring not only to NFT collectors, but also to a younger generation of internet users.

Ford described plans to create a Getty-like portal for black images before adjusting his vision to be more forward-thinking. After all, today’s circulation of images online hardly depends on commercial licensing. In Ford’s view, black creators have been at the forefront of the creator economy and are poised to benefit from the Web3 shift.

“Black people have always thrived in a decentralized environment, without the heavy hands of guidance and oversight,” Ford said.

At the same time, much of Ford’s work involves working with an older generation as they attempt to build Obsidian’s image archive while explaining these Web3 strategies.

During a dinner hosted by Lobus and the Obsidian Collective at the Harlem Red Rooster restaurant, Ford recounted a conversation she had with a photographer.

“He was over 75, he’s never been married and had no children, but he has over 100,000 images he’s taken in his lifetime and he wants people to see them. see,” Ford said over the dinner. “He said, ‘Look, I don’t care if my second cousin can make money off of this. What he wanted was for his story to be told.

By word of mouth, Ford has tried to find these oldtimers who have seen so much history. The Obsidian Collective will host select images, such as images of airmen from Tuskagee and Ru-Jac Charm School, Chicago’s black label school, that were not previously widely available. In this way, Ford’s new venture will become a means of preserving history.

“These are images that haven’t been seen for decades, literally 40 to 80 years, because they haven’t been digitized,” Ford said. “If we don’t pass on this information in the future, it will be lost.”

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Professional photographer keeps Alaska in focus https://photobolsillo.com/professional-photographer-keeps-alaska-in-focus/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 20:17:52 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/professional-photographer-keeps-alaska-in-focus/ For Natalie Fobes, taking a photo is more than simply capturing a moment. It’s about creating a deeper connection to the time and place and the people (or wildlife) behind the photos – experiences that she will take with her forever. Nathalie Fobes As a professional photographer, Seattle-based Fobes has traveled the Pacific Northwest and […]]]>

For Natalie Fobes, taking a photo is more than simply capturing a moment. It’s about creating a deeper connection to the time and place and the people (or wildlife) behind the photos – experiences that she will take with her forever.



Nathalie Fobes

As a professional photographer, Seattle-based Fobes has traveled the Pacific Northwest and the world capturing animals in their natural habitat for National geographic, doing photo shoots for corporate clients, and everything in between. Her work also took her to a destination that captured her heart and mind throughout her life – Alaska – the final frontier. Fobes’ first trip to Alaska was to Dutch Harbor in 1981 and since then she has returned to the state numerous times to photograph wildlife, fishermen and Native American cultures. With his extensive experience in Alaska and on fishing boats, Fobes was able to hang out with fishermen and capture the aftermath of the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill disaster.

Most recently, Fobes cruised across Alaska helping travelers connect with their natural surroundings as an onboard “Alaska Insider” photography expert for UnCruise Adventures, a small boat adventure cruise company that promises “NO LINES, NO CROWDS, GREAT ADVENTURE”.

As an Alaska expert, Fobes was hired by the cruise line along with other photographers, biologists, environmentalists, professors, and natives to enrich the guest experience by presenting workshops and leading activities. On board. Fobes presented two lectures and a series of half-day photography workshops, and provided informal instruction to UnCruise guests with varying levels of photography experience.

“Someone told me that people have to love and feel committed to something to want to save it and protect it,” she says. “I hope anyone who travels to Alaska will come back feeling like it’s such a special place; it needs our protection.

Cruising keeps the economy afloat

The UnCruise fleet includes small expedition vessels and boutique yachts – each uniquely suited and equipped for an incredible experience. The shallow draft makes each ship capable of nimble exploration and opens up new places big ships can’t go.

Although UnCruise Expeditions depart from Alaska to operate more sustainably and save fuel, most UnCruise employees live and work in the Seattle office, right at Fishermen’s Terminal. This is a great example of how the cruise industry supports local jobs in our region. For example, during the 2022 Seattle cruise season, 1.2 million cruise passengers will depart from Seattle, delivering nearly $900 million in economic benefits supporting 5,500 jobs. Cruise ships drive the economy through jobs on board and in corporate offices and dollars spent at restaurants, hotels and local attractions. And even supplying home port ships with local products like wine, fresh produce, dairy, seafood, flowers and services like piano tuning.

Teaching rejuvenates and inspires

Kayaks circling the UnCruise ship

Fobes derives personal satisfaction from sharing his love of photography and watching his students improve their skills.

“That’s the best thing about photography. When you take a picture, you are emotionally attached to that experience. Through photography, you can relive that experience over and over again. When you help people improve their photos, it’s not just about enjoying and having that experience. They present this experience to others and help others react to this photo. It’s really satisfying for me.

Fobes loved teaching so much that she ran a few extra, personal workshops for UnCruise guests. While they were on deck looking at the scenery, she provided quick tips for all levels of photographer and showed examples of what she photographed on the cruise.

“We were talking about composition and color and defining moments,” she says. “At the end of the day people would gather and I would set up my laptop and show people how to adjust photos in (Adobe) Lightroom. I loved the interaction between the guests, the wildlife, the environment and the photography. Working on the cruise ship was a great combination of all of those things. I had a lot of excitement and inspiration from the guests and their enthusiasm to see the beauty of Alaska. The whole experience was wonderful. I came back refreshed and inspired to resume my work.

Life changing experiences

When people travel to Alaska, they come back forever changed, Fobes said.

“Alaska is where I go to recharge. The ecosystem and the environment are so beautiful. It’s very fragile and I hope anyone who discovers the beauty and wonder will realize that it must help protect it so that others can experience what they have experienced.

Humpback whale breach

Marine mammals

Fobes recounts several close encounters with wildlife that have brought all travelers closer. One night after dinner, guests were on deck looking out at the clear blue sky and calm water, on the lookout for whales. Suddenly, the skipper sees humpback whales in the distance. Travelers saw the whales exhale and slap their tails a quarter of a mile ahead of the ship. Suddenly a humpback whale jumped out of the calm water and crashed about 300ft ahead of the ship, silhouetted against the evening sun which highlighted the splash.

“You could hear a shout from the crowd – a collective gasp from the people on the bridge,” she says.

Then laughter and cheers.

“There was no indication that a whale was that close to us. I had turned around to talk to someone, and the only thing I saw of the whale breach was the ‘splash,” she said. “It was one of those moments, a collective experience that no one will ever forget. It has been improved by the reaction of people who have experienced it.

Fobes had planned to give a talk later that evening about her experience photographing the Exxon Valdez oil spill, a tragic story and always a moving experience for her.

“I said to the cruise director, ‘I don’t think I should be giving a talk on the Exxon Valdez today.’ I wanted this incredible moment to be the story of the day,” she says.

spying orcs

Orcs in the inner passage

Fobes shared another epic wildlife moment on another cruise with an organization focused on environmental and biology stories. The ship was passing through the Inside Passage and encountered killer whales near Johnstone Strait, British Columbia. The ship shut down its engine and kept its distance to avoid interfering with the orcas.

“We saw killer whales approaching and then they disappeared,” said Fobes. “When I got to the rail and looked down I saw they had gone under our boat and turned sideways so they could look at us. It was amazing.”

Another time, Fobes was on the deck of an UnCruise ship listening to the calm around her and the rain in the trees and on the water. In the distance, she heard a humpback whale blowing. The experience reminded her why Alaska is such a renewing place for her and why it touches people when they go there.

“I think the personal experience people have in Alaska reminds them that living in crowded cities may not be normal for the human species. We need to monitor wild places to make sure they don’t go extinct. No. We need it as a human species.

Enhance your photos

Eagle with mountain decor

Keep reading Natalie Fobes’ tips that will take your photos to the next level.

1. Think about composition

Before you take your photo, take a minute to think about your photo and what the audience will see.

“When you start out photographing, people tend to put whatever interests them in the center of the photograph,” Fobes said. “I encourage people to look at the guidelines in nature and see what they are doing by creating a photograph rather than taking a photo.”

Pro tip: When composing your photos, use the rule of thirds. Divide your photo into nine equal sections with a set of vertical and horizontal lines. With the imaginary frame in place, place the most important element or elements of your shot on one of the lines or where the lines meet.

2. Go horizontal

“Alaska is vast, and people tend to shoot vertically with their smartphones,” said Fobes. “Consider putting your phone in a horizontal position and exploring dialing that way.”

3. Anticipate the action

You need to think like a sports photographer when photographing wildlife. A photographer must learn the rules of the game, anticipate the action, capture those decisive moments and give way if a football player or a brown bear runs in his path.

“Anticipate the behavior of the animals in your photo; anticipate the action, she says. “Be ready for this action when it comes.”

4. No filters, more pop

“I don’t believe in using filters or drastically altering photos, but I recommend upping the contrast a bit by adding a deeper black in post-processing software like Adobe Lightroom. Often this will bring up the photo.

She also teaches students dodging and etching, a technique originally used in a darkroom that can now be recreated in image processing software. Dodging can lighten a spot in the photo, and engraving darkens a particular area.

Alaska backdrop

More resources

Take these LinkedIn Learning courses from Natalie Fobes to learn at home before heading out into the wild.

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Elon University / Performing Arts / Alumni of Dance https://photobolsillo.com/elon-university-performing-arts-alumni-of-dance/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 07:21:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/elon-university-performing-arts-alumni-of-dance/ Dancing Elders Danielle ‘Dani’ Biggs ’15 BFA in Dance and BA in Arts Administration Director of Development at Dancing Classrooms in New York and Zumba Instructor Pursue an MA in Educational Policy and Leadership from American University Abby Williams Menton ’14 BFA in Dance and BA in Arts Administration, Minor in Communications Performance Credits: The […]]]>

Dancing Elders

Danielle ‘Dani’ Biggs ’15

BFA in Dance and BA in Arts Administration

Director of Development at Dancing Classrooms in New York and Zumba Instructor

Pursue an MA in Educational Policy and Leadership from American University


Abby Williams Menton ’14

BFA in Dance and BA in Arts Administration, Minor in Communications

Performance Credits: The Coincidentals, Jamm ‘n Honey, Heather Carpenter, Sara Tourek and Jason Aryeh

Choreographic credits: Founder and artistic director of Cattywampus Dance; over 15 original works featured at Full Circle Festival, Delve Dance Festival, Bates Dance Festival and Dance Chicago’s New Moves Series

Pursuing her Masters in Dance at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Rachel Perlman Clac ’10

BFA in Dance and Minor in Business Administration

Performance Credits: Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat (domestic and international tours), West Side Story, 42nd Street, Mary Poppins, A Christmas Carol, Singin’ in the Rain, Prince of Egypt, Matilda, Cinderella, The Aluminum Show (tour International), Royal Caribbean Cruise, Holland America Cruise (Dancing Captain)


Abby Corrigan ’18

BFA in Dance and BA in Arts Administration

Performance credits: Summation Dance Company, Lila Artists, VALLETO Dance

Choreographic credits: Movement Festival, WAXworks Showcase, Dairy Arts Center (commissioned)

Program Coordinator for the Independent Study Program at Peridance Center in Manhattan


Julie Crothers ’14

BFA in dance

Performance credits: AXIS Dance Company, Sarah Bush Dance Project, Tara Pilbrow Dance, Wax Poet(s) and Kickbal

Choreography Credits: Solo works performed on numerous stages in the San Francisco Bay Area, Selected Guest Artist, Artist-in-Residence and Guest Choreographer for a number of dance organizations.

Dance Magazine named her one of “25 to watch” in 2020


Rachel Linsky ’19

BFA in Dance and BA in Arts Administration

Performance credits: Connections Dance Theatre, KAIROS Dance Theater

Choreography Credits: Artist-in-Residence at Chelsea Theater Works, One Night’s Work “Zachor: Honoring WWII Holocaust Survivors Through Dance”

Awards: New England Foundation for the Arts Fellowship, Combined Jewish Philanthropies Fellowship

Educational credits: Urbanity Dance, The Dance Academy of Siagel Productions, Velocity Dance Company, Apollinaire Play Lab


Allie Lochary ’09

BFA in dance

Performance credits: Summation Dance Company, Oliver Steele, In-Sight Dance Company, Time Chester Dance, The Kearns Dance Project, Martha Connerton/Kinetic Works

Choreography credits: North Carolina Dance Alliance, ACDA

Certified Pilates teacher in schools around New York


Lauren Renck Manning’13

BFA in Dance and BA in Strategic Communication

Performance credits: Radio City Music Hall Rockettes, various professional festivals across the country and Europe

Choreography credits: ACDA Adjudication Concert

Advertising Account Manager at Dance Magazine


Annie Marx ’20

BFA in Dance and BA in Strategic Communication

Performance Credits: Mal Ped Dance Collective, Angelo Egarese, Ashley “Robi” Robicheaux, Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Company, Jason Aryeh, Justin Tornow, Jen Guy Metcalf, Kira Blazik, Lauren Kearns, Matt Pardo, Renay Aumiller

Marketing Assistant at the Joyce Theater in Manhattan


Lucas Melfi ’17

BFA in dance

Performance credits: Gaspard Louis, Summation Dance Company, Trent Williams, Diane Coburn Bruning, TERRANOVA Dance Theatre, The Kearns Dance Project, RAD | Renay Aumiller Danse, The Dance Cure and Gerri Houlihan

Choreographic credits: American Dance Guild Festival, EMERGENCE Festival


Kalie-Ann Nassoura ’21

BFA in Dance and BA in Strategic Communication

Performance Credits: Starring role in Disney Channel Original Series, Shook, The Weeknd, Nike, New Kids on the Block, Sony Music, Paris Fashion Week, Lil Xan


Alyssa Needham ’19

BFA in Dance and Communication Minor

Talent agency: Go2Talent

Performance credits: Helado Negro, Brooke Alexx, Crossrope, Lumin Skincare

Pilates Instructor at Bodyline in Beverly Hills


Alex Pepper ’11

BFA in Dance and Musical Theater

Dance Credits: South Pacific (National Tour), Kennedy Center, Walnut Street, ArtPark, CPCC, Fulton Theater

Acting Credits: SNL, Law & Order: SVU, Independent Films

Directing credits: Doritos Commercial (top 10 2015 Super Bowl finalists)

Director of Photography at Peppermatic Pictures in Atlanta, GA


Helen Phelan ’13

BFA in Dance and BA in Psychology

Performance credits: Celebrity Cruise Line

Founder: Helen Phelan Studio, a Pilates-based studio that promotes positivity, self-care, body appreciation, intuitive exercise, and holistic health

Awards: Women’s Health 2021 Fit Tech Award for “Best Neutral Body Workouts”


Maya sank ’16

BFA in dance

Continuing Education: Studied with Vertigo Dance Company in Jerusalem, Israel

Founder: Maya Moves, offering personalized private dance lessons to adults and children

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Dom Phillips, British correspondent in Brazil, dies at 57 https://photobolsillo.com/dom-phillips-british-correspondent-in-brazil-dies-at-57/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 22:59:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/dom-phillips-british-correspondent-in-brazil-dies-at-57/ Placeholder while loading article actions Dom Phillips, a Brazil-based British journalist who had written for the Washington Post, the Guardian and other news outlets and was a leading columnist of the devastating environmental effects of deforestation in the Amazon, died in the remote valley from Javari, in western Brazil, where he was looking for a […]]]>
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Dom Phillips, a Brazil-based British journalist who had written for the Washington Post, the Guardian and other news outlets and was a leading columnist of the devastating environmental effects of deforestation in the Amazon, died in the remote valley from Javari, in western Brazil, where he was looking for a book. He was 57 years old.

According to media reports, he and Bruno Araújo Pereira, an expert on the country’s indigenous peoples, were traveling by boat on the Itaquai River in the Brazilian state of Amazonas, known in recent years for increasing violence by illegal fishermen, loggers and drug traffickers. Both men were last seen alive on June 5.

Police announced on Friday that human remains recovered from a remote forest belonged to Mr Phillips. A fisherman this week confessed to killing the journalist and his traveling companion, police said, and led investigators to a remote location where the remains were buried.

Authorities have not announced whether another set of human remains collected belong to Pereira, but testing continues. No cause of death has been confirmed, but police say it is likely the men were shot. At least two men are in custody and police expect more arrests to be made soon.

Mr Phillips, a former music journalist in England, had lived in Brazil since 2007. He learned Portuguese and married a Brazilian and lived in São Paolo, Rio de Janeiro and more recently Salvador, the capital of the state of northeast of Bahia.

He was a versatile journalist who wrote about politics, poverty and cultural developments in Brazil. As a contributor to The Post from 2014 to 2016, he covered the country’s preparations for the World Cup soccer tournament and the 2016 Summer Olympics. He then examined whether the Games had conferred an advantage sustainability in Rio de Janeiro.

“Three months after the successful hosting of the Summer Olympics, Brazil’s cultural hub is set to soar,” he wrote in The Post. “Instead, it’s a financial, political and criminal mess.”

Mr. Phillips was particularly drawn to the plight of Brazil’s natural world and the indigenous peoples living deep within the Amazon rainforest. He traveled across the country to report on deforestation, as farmers and other business interests destroyed large swaths of Brazil’s once-dense rainforests. He led the Guardian’s investigation into large-scale cattle ranches established on cleared forest land.

“Dom is one of the most ethical and courageous journalists I know,” Andrew Fishman, an American journalist working in Brazil, told the Latin American news service CE Noticias Financieras. “He has always been extremely rigorous in his work and incisive in his analyses.”

In 2019, Mr Phillips asked Bolsonaro about deforestation in the countryside. Bolsonaro, who favors mining and other business developments, replied: “First of all, you have to understand that the Amazon belongs to Brazil, not to you.”

A video of the exchange caused a stir among Bolosanaro supporters, who used it to promote their view that the president was being attacked by the media.

“Dom was very shaken by this video,” Fishman said. “He felt it put a target on his back and made his job more difficult.”

In 2018, Mr Phillips joined Pereira and photographer Gary Calton on a 17-day trip to the Amazon – nearly 600 miles by boat and a 45-mile trek on foot – as Pereira, then a government official, attempted to take contact with isolated people. Aboriginal groups.

“As he crouches in the mud by a fire,” Mr Phillips wrote in an evocative story for the Guardian, “Bruno Pereira, an official with the Brazilian government’s indigenous agency, opens the boiled skull of a monkey with a spoon and eats its brains for breakfast as he discusses politics.

Mr Phillips dubbed some of the people he met “the ninjas of this forest, [who] are as protective as they are at home. They fish for piranhas and hunt, butcher and cook birds, monkeys, sloths and boars to eat them.

When a local man was asked if agricultural development and mining should be allowed in indigenous territories, he replied: “No. We take care of our land.

Mr. Phillips has returned to the Javari Valley several times to conduct research for a book tentatively titled “How to Save the Amazon”. He received a grant from the Alicia Patterson Foundation to help fund his reporting.

In recent years, the region had become increasingly dangerous, with more than 150 environmental activists killed in Brazil between 2009 and 2020, according to the Latin American journalism project Tierra de Resistentes.

After Mr Phillips and Pereira failed to show up for a meeting scheduled for June 5, Aboriginal people reported a boat following them.

Mr Phillips’ wife, Alessandra Sampaio, has called on the Brazilian government to act quickly to find her husband and Pereira. Brazilian celebrities, including soccer star Pelé, joined the public appeal. News outlets – such as The Post, The Guardian and The New York Times, all of which Mr Phillips had written for – published an open letter demanding that the Brazilian government “urgently intensify and fully fund its efforts” to find men.

When Bolsonaro was informed of their disappearance, he seemed to suggest that they were at fault.

“Anything can happen,” he said. “It could have been an accident. They could have been executed.”

After the discovery of their remains, Bolsonaro said: “This Englishman was not liked in the region. … He should have more than redoubled the precautions he was taking. And he decided to go on an excursion instead.

The statement caused an uproar in Brazil and abroad.

“The victims are not the culprits,” one of Bolsonaro’s political opponents, Orlando Silva, said in a tweet.

Dominic Mark Phillips was born on July 23, 1964 in Bebington, a town near Liverpool in the Merseyside region of northwest England. He left college to travel in the 1980s and lived in Israel, Greece, Denmark and Australia, taking odd jobs including picking fruit, working as a chef and cleaning a meat factory.

He became a devotee of a form of electronic dance music called house, and in the late 1980s helped found an art magazine in Bristol, England. He moved to London in 1990 and worked as an editor at Mixmag, a magazine chronicling house music. He coined the term “progressive house” to describe “a new breed of harsh but melodious, hard-hitting but reflective, uplifting and trancey British house”.

He left publishing in 1999 to produce documentaries and music videos. In 2009 he published ‘DJ Superstars Here We Go!’, a book described in a Guardian review as ‘in part, a memoir of his days in clubs and after-parties awash in champagne, vodka, cocaine and alcohol. ‘ecstasy’.

Mr Phillips first visited Brazil in 1998. After settling there nine years later, he largely abandoned his nightlife habits and often rose before dawn to stand -up paddle on the waterways.

“On the one hand, it’s like being in Europe or America,” he said in a 2008 interview with DMCWorld magazine, a music publication. “On the other hand, it’s completely different – like entering a glass world where everything looks the same but is actually upside down, upside down, upside down, whatever. … The best thing about this country is the people — they’re really open, friendly and positive. They love the music. Rich or poor, they do their best to make the most of life.

In addition to his wife, the survivors include a sister and a brother.

Mr Phillips turned down several high-profile job offers, preferring to stay in Brazil as a freelance writer, contributing to the Financial Times, Bloomberg News and football magazines. He was well known to international journalists and taught English and volunteered in poor neighborhoods.

“He enjoys seeing the impact of his work on people’s lives,” Cecília Olliveira, founder of Fogo Cruzado, a website documenting violence in Brazil, told CE Noticias Financieras. “He likes to do journalism that makes a difference, that exposes abuse, that helps protect those in need of protection.”

Terrence McCoy in Brazil contributed to this report.

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Pasadena Museum of History reopens with VIP reception for current exhibits – Pasadena Weekendr https://photobolsillo.com/pasadena-museum-of-history-reopens-with-vip-reception-for-current-exhibits-pasadena-weekendr/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 02:58:12 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/pasadena-museum-of-history-reopens-with-vip-reception-for-current-exhibits-pasadena-weekendr/ Patrons and donors of the Pasadena Museum of History gathered in the museum and on its expansive grounds to celebrate the reopening of the museum after an almost 2-year hiatus due to COVID. The Museum’s two current exhibitions were also celebrated: A New Beginning: Transforming Pasadena, 1890-1930 and Frozen Images Preserving Pasadena’s Visual Heritage. Attendees […]]]>

Patrons and donors of the Pasadena Museum of History gathered in the museum and on its expansive grounds to celebrate the reopening of the museum after an almost 2-year hiatus due to COVID. The Museum’s two current exhibitions were also celebrated: A New Beginning: Transforming Pasadena, 1890-1930 and Frozen Images Preserving Pasadena’s Visual Heritage.

Attendees strolled through the exhibits and grounds, appreciating the historical artifacts and reveling in greeting old friends and new acquaintances in person!

Restart is currently on display at the Willis Stork and Ralph M. Parsons Foundation Galleries. The exhibit presents the fascinating story of the unprecedented growth that transformed Pasadena from a farming community into a renowned winter resort and vibrant young town.

Frozen frames is organized by Anuja Navare. This is the second part of the Museum’s ambitious four-part online exhibition featuring images from the nationally significant J. Allen Hawkins Collection. Hawkins, a multi-talented and prolific mid-century commercial photographer, documented a wide range of Pasadena people, places, and events.

The galleries are open to the public, Friday to Sunday, from noon to 5:00 p.m. For questions or more information about Pasadena Museum of History programs, visit www.pasadenahistory.org or call (626) 577-1660.



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Shabu worth P2M seized in Zamboanga City https://photobolsillo.com/shabu-worth-p2m-seized-in-zamboanga-city/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 10:34:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/shabu-worth-p2m-seized-in-zamboanga-city/ Suspect in handcuff graphics. INVESTIGATOR.net ZAMBOANGA CITY, Zamboanga del Sur—A commercial photographer and his companion were arrested during a raid on Martha Drive, Santa Catalina village in this city on Sunday. Major Shellamae Chang, spokesman for Regional Police Bureau 9 (PRO9), said the raiding parties seized more than 2 million pesos worth of methamphetamine hydrochloride, […]]]>

Suspect in handcuff graphics. INVESTIGATOR.net

ZAMBOANGA CITY, Zamboanga del Sur—A commercial photographer and his companion were arrested during a raid on Martha Drive, Santa Catalina village in this city on Sunday.

Major Shellamae Chang, spokesman for Regional Police Bureau 9 (PRO9), said the raiding parties seized more than 2 million pesos worth of methamphetamine hydrochloride, known locally as “shabu”, in part of their operation against illegal drugs.

Police identified the two drug traffickers as Adriano Ganela Pedro, also known as Jun-jun, 40, a photographer who lived in Barangay Santa Catalina; and Jimhar Jalani Usman, also known as Jemsrockz, 40, an unemployed resident of Barangay Talon-Talon.

Chang said the team recovered six sachets containing around 300 grams of suspected shabu. They also seized a mobile phone, a clutch, an eco-bag, a motorcycle and marked money from the two suspects.

Pedro and Usman are in the custody of Zamboanga City Police Station (ZCPS) 11 pending charges.

Chang said the team, made up of personnel from ZCPS 11, the anti-drug unit and other special police units, conducted three takeover operations on June 12.

In another operation in Barangay Kasanyangan, police arrested Mumar Baning Sahari, 25, and Jamal Jimlani, 27, after police recovered a shabu worth 4,700 pesos from them.

At Sitio Davuy Grande in Barangay Sibulay, police collected 1,700 pesos worth of shabu from a PUJ driver named Benhar Ajalal Abdul, 40, of Duncaan, Barangay Mangusu.

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Petra Collins Announces New Registration for MasterClass Photography Session – The Hollywood Reporter https://photobolsillo.com/petra-collins-announces-new-registration-for-masterclass-photography-session-the-hollywood-reporter/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 23:12:53 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/petra-collins-announces-new-registration-for-masterclass-photography-session-the-hollywood-reporter/ Petra Collins was a teenager when she first picked up a 35mm camera, knowing little about the device or the industry that revolves around it. According to the 29-year-old Toronto, Canada native, she “never learned the basics”, leaving her to explore the medium as her own teacher – a journey that has now turned into […]]]>

Petra Collins was a teenager when she first picked up a 35mm camera, knowing little about the device or the industry that revolves around it. According to the 29-year-old Toronto, Canada native, she “never learned the basics”, leaving her to explore the medium as her own teacher – a journey that has now turned into a famous editorial career. and commercial (she shot for Gucci, Adidas, vogue, The New York Times, CR Fashion Book and many others) and made him known for a defining photographic style of the 2010s.

“When I took a photography class when I was young, I never felt anything was penetrating; I felt like I wasn’t learning how to take a picture,” Collins said in an interview with The Hollywood Reporter. “When I found other ways to learn, it really helped me in my practice.”

Today, educational streaming platform MasterClass announced Collins as one of its newest instructors in its “Sessions” initiative; the 30-day program, which is pre-recorded and divided into five sections of three to four 10-minute lessons, is available to all MasterClass members at any time. Students will learn lighting techniques and the process of creating a series, and will receive feedback on assignments after each session. Registration for the Collins session is available starting today; the class will go live on July 1.

Petra Collins Masterclass
Courtesy of Master Class

“I wanted to teach this different approach to photography which, in my opinion, is easier to learn and helps the student to better understand photography. I think the way I was taught was so mechanical. And that’s really not how photography works,” says Collins.

“Petra’s aesthetic helped define film photography for this generation,” David Rogier, founder and CEO of MasterClass, said in a statement. “During her session, she offers exclusive insight into her style, approach and expertise, helping members learn how they can creatively express themselves through film photography.”

She teaches the technical basics – like shutter speed – of shooting with a 35mm SLR camera, and also shares creative approaches to developing concepts and integrating the self into imagery. “I guess the thing I really teach is just to learn deep and look inside,” Collins says. “Because it’s the endless well of information – you won’t find it anywhere else.”

Collins first became acquainted with MasterClass when she signed up for a class from David Lynch, whom she describes as “one of my idols” and thought it was unique that “the artist dictates the conversation”. Although she’s been lecturing at universities since she was 17 (read: educating her peers), this is the first time she’s taught a “large-scale” photography class where more people can access it. “, she says.

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Petra Collins Masterclass
Courtesy of Master Class

Collins’ MasterClass students can also expect insight into the process of working with some of the biggest names in the entertainment industry; in one section, the photographer – who has captured Solange Knowles, Frank Ocean and Kim Kardashian, to name a few – focuses on how to create intimacy with subjects, especially those that shine with visibility.

“The way I learned everything about art was through collaboration. So every time I have a subject, I approach it as a really exciting collaboration…I’m like, ‘What the hell is this? what do you want to feel? Or what do you want to own? What image do you want to project? is that you really want their input, and then you also want to give them something new.

Most recently, Collins collaborated with teenage pop star Olivia Rodrigo on two music videos (“I have to express what I want to do in feature films,” she says) and released a book, Fairy tales, with Euphoria star Alexa Demie which is published by Rizzoli. “With my book Fairy tales, my topic Alexa and I were revisiting childhood trauma. And what we were looking for to help us through this young stage of our lives.

Aesthetically, Collins’ images have been variously but consistently described as dreamlike and feminine, making her fixation on fantasy – and the fever dream that is youth – appropriate. But in a slightly twisted plotline, she says she’s long been inspired by coming-of-age body horror movies, like The Exorcist and Carrie. She also loves the work of fellow Canadian David Cronenberg.

Collins now lives in Los Angeles, where she explores a different type of film: movies. “Moving to LA was really exciting because I live – as a foreigner – in this city which is basically built on fame, which is unlike any city in the world. All the billboards, as well as the historic buildings, are haunted in a very beautiful way,” she says. “Now that I’m in this environment, it will seep into my photos.”

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Renowned photographer Rankin and CSL Behring team up to launch ‘Portraits of Progress’, an exhibition chronicling the past, present and future of living with hemophilia https://photobolsillo.com/renowned-photographer-rankin-and-csl-behring-team-up-to-launch-portraits-of-progress-an-exhibition-chronicling-the-past-present-and-future-of-living-with-hemophilia/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/renowned-photographer-rankin-and-csl-behring-team-up-to-launch-portraits-of-progress-an-exhibition-chronicling-the-past-present-and-future-of-living-with-hemophilia/ by Rankin the first in-person U.S. exhibit in three years features portraits and personal stories highlighting remarkable advances in understanding and treating hemophilia and hopes for the future KING OF PRUSSIA, Pa., June 9, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — CSL Behring, world leader in biotherapeutics and renowned portrait photographer Rankin have partnered to launch “Portraits of Progress,” […]]]>

by Rankin the first in-person U.S. exhibit in three years features portraits and personal stories highlighting remarkable advances in understanding and treating hemophilia and hopes for the future

KING OF PRUSSIA, Pa., June 9, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — CSL Behring, world leader in biotherapeutics and renowned portrait photographer Rankin have partnered to launch “Portraits of Progress,” a multimedia campaign featuring the stories and experiences of people living with hemophilia from the mid-20th century to today. This exhibition, the first of its kind, introduces visitors to the remarkable pace of progress in the treatment of hemophilia, from the identification of hemophilia A and B in the 1940s, to the therapeutic advances available today. today and continuing research focused on gene therapies for the bleeding disorder.

Check out the interactive multi-channel press release here: https://www.multivu.com/players/English/9039751-portraits-of-progress-hemophilia/

“I’ve worked with the hemophilia community for 35 years, and it’s been amazing to see the advances that have been made in both treatment and education,” said a woman named Sue, a hematology nurse coordinator at the retirement, whose portrait and history are presented in the exhibition. “Thanks to medical and therapeutic advances, people with hemophilia who receive proper treatment live longer than ever before and have the freedom to do more. We never know what the future holds, but I think looking at all the research and everything on the horizon, there will only be positive things for our bleeding disorders community. »

“Portraits of Progress” is an immersive multimedia exhibit designed to educate about living with hemophilia by documenting the progress in our understanding of the disease and the community’s hopes for the future. Featuring portraits of people with hemophilia, caregivers and medical professionals photographed by Rankinalong with personal stories, archival footage and a timeline of key scientific discoveries, viewers are drawn from life in the 1950s and 1960s when life expectancies were less than 20 years, through the evolution of transformative recombinant therapies in the 1990s and 2000s, for the prospect of a single-dose treatment under investigation that could offer even more possibilities for patients in the future.

Opening on June 11 in New York City and on tour in the United States and Europe later in the year, “Portraits of Progress” will be by Rankin first live exhibition in the United States in three years.

“As a photographer, I’ve turned to campaigns that can make a difference,” Rankin said. “Hemophilia is something I thought I understood, but I realized there was so much to learn. Listening to these exceptional stories and learning more about the extraordinary journey of this community has been truly an education and a privilege. I hope this exhibit will lead to greater awareness and understanding of hemophilia and the amazing people within this tight-knit community. »

The exhibition is located at 89 Crosby Street, Soho, New York City and run to June 19 of 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Daily. The exhibition can also be viewed virtually at www.portraitsofprogress.com.

“Driven by our promise to support people living with rare and serious diseases, CSL Behring has a long history of innovation and collaboration with the bleeding disorders community, whether through cutting-edge treatments or our programs that provide education, support and connection,” said Bob Lojewski, Senior Vice President and General Manager of North American Business Operations, CSL Behring. “We are constantly impressed by this incredible group of people, and we hope ‘Portraits of Progress’ will shine a light on this vibrant and engaged community and inspire those who live with hemophilia every day.”

About hemophilia
Hemophilia is a rare disease in which the blood does not clot normally because it does not contain enough blood-clotting proteins, called clotting factors. The two most common types of hemophilia are A and B. Hemophilia A is the most common type of hemophilia and is caused by a lack of blood clotting factor VIII, while hemophilia B is caused by a lack of factor IX (FIX). The more severe the disease, the less a person is able to form blood clots, which makes them more vulnerable to bleeding.

People with the disease are particularly vulnerable to bleeding into joints, muscles and internal organs, leading to pain, swelling and joint damage. Current treatment includes lifelong prophylactic clotting factor infusions to temporarily replace or supplement low blood clotting factor levels.

About gene therapy
In general, gene therapies are an innovative approach to treating medical conditions by introducing a functional or working gene into the body or by turning off or changing the gene causing the condition.

Current treatments for hemophilia work to temporarily replace or supplement low blood clotting factor levels, but gene therapy has the potential to restore near-normal blood clotting ability.

Clinical trials of gene therapy for hemophilia are still ongoing and none are currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Experimental gene therapies aim to allow patients to create their own factor through a single infusion, potentially providing long-lasting protection against bleeding for years. Gene therapy can potentially provide long-term benefits of sustained factor activity levels from a single treatment administration, potentially reducing or even eliminating the need for regular long-term prophylaxis.

About Rankin
Rankin is a British photographer, editor and director. He is best known for his work at the forefront of culture and the forefront of future trends, producing campaigns that break the rules.

As a photographer, by Rankin portfolio ranges from portrait to documentary. He has photographed several high profile musicians, actors, models and cultural icons.

As an editor, Rankin co-founded the founding magazine Dazed & Confused, and has since published over 40 books and founded the print and digital platform Hunger.

by Rankin work has been published everywhere, from his own exhibitions at Elle, Vogue, Esquire, GQ, Rolling Stone and Wonderland, and exhibited in galleries around the world, including MoMA, New Yorkand the Victoria & Albert Museum, London.

About CSL Behring
CSL Behring is a global biotherapeutics leader driven by our promise to save lives. Focused on meeting patient needs using the latest technologies, we discover, develop and deliver innovative therapies for people living with conditions in the therapeutic areas of immunology, hematology, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, breathing and transplants. We use three strategic science platforms of plasma fractionation, recombinant protein technology, and cell and gene therapy to support continuous innovation and continually refine the ways in which products can address unmet medical needs and help patients to lead full lives.

CSL Behring operates one of the largest plasma collection networks in the world, CSL Plasma. The parent company, CSL Limited (ASX:CSL;USOTC:CSLLY), headquartered in Melbourne, Australia, employs more than 25,000 people worldwide and provides its lifesaving therapies to people in more than 100 countries. For inspiring stories about the promise of biotechnology, visit Vita CSLBehring.com/vita and follow us on Twitter.com/CSL Behring.

Media Contact
Etanjalie Ayala
Mobile: +1 610 297 1069
E-mail: [email protected]

SOURCECSL Behring

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