Aerial photographer – Photo Bolsillo http://photobolsillo.com/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 16:41:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://photobolsillo.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Aerial photographer – Photo Bolsillo http://photobolsillo.com/ 32 32 Thoughts on a life behind the camera https://photobolsillo.com/thoughts-on-a-life-behind-the-camera/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 16:41:15 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/thoughts-on-a-life-behind-the-camera/ Content of the article For our fall issue of Umbrella magazine, the Quinte Arts Council shared a profile of Mike Gaudaur, a local photographer and owner of Quinte Studios. Here are his thoughts on a life behind the camera: “My addiction to photography started in high school the day I discovered there was a darkroom […]]]>

Content of the article

For our fall issue of Umbrella magazine, the Quinte Arts Council shared a profile of Mike Gaudaur, a local photographer and owner of Quinte Studios. Here are his thoughts on a life behind the camera:

“My addiction to photography started in high school the day I discovered there was a darkroom hidden behind the chemistry class. I quickly racked up a big bill for all the film and paper I was using. However, I soon learned that I could afford this and had enough left to buy my lunch, selling sports action photos to college athletes. This eventually led to sports and human interest reporting for the Trentonian newspaper, and part-time employment as a darkroom technician.

Throughout my university studies and my first 10 years of teaching in college, I began to photograph weddings, portraits, plays, and even aerial photographs.

In 1998 the opportunity arose to teach at an international mission school in Kenya. With my wife and my two young children, we went to Africa. What was to be a two-year adventure turned into a 15-year experience. It didn’t take me long to run the school’s graphic arts department, teach photography and graphic design, and ultimately take the program from film to digital.

Being located halfway between half a dozen of Africa’s best wildlife parks gave me the incredible opportunity to go on over 70 photo safaris, often leading groups of photographers and other times exploring it all. alone. There is nothing like the tranquility of sitting next to a herd of grazing elephants in the African savannah, where the loudest sound is the tearing of the grass and the clicking of my shutter. . There were also some really exhilarating moments like driving my Land Rover through swollen rivers or following lions on the hunt.

Content of the article

Returning to Canada in 2013 allowed me to fulfill my lifelong dream of opening my own photography studio. I love the varied challenges my clients bring me, from taking technical photographs of a 100-foot dinosaur for the Smithsonian, to trying to put a smile on a two-year-old for a portrait. of family. One of the most difficult jobs I face on a regular basis is producing printed reproductions of paintings and drawings for artists. They are generally very particular in that each tone and shade is just right.

Many photographers believe that once an image is captured with their camera, their job is done. I firmly believe that the darkroom, whether chemical or digital, is where the real magic happens. I love that I can take the RAW pixel data captured by my professional DSLR cameras, my pocket compact camera, or even my iPhone, and use all the power of modern technology to produce an image that brings viewers to their senses. stop for a moment and explore my photographs. I believe that “the world is charged with the greatness of God” and my job as a photographer is to get people to stop and notice it.

Learn more at mikegaudaurphotography.com.


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New documentary highlights ‘last right whale’ https://photobolsillo.com/new-documentary-highlights-last-right-whale/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/new-documentary-highlights-last-right-whale/ Without the tragedy that befell the North Atlantic right whales in 2017, a new documentary on the plight of one of the region’s most endangered species may never have been made. The last of the right whales tells the stories of many people in Canada and the United States who are committed to studying and […]]]>

Without the tragedy that befell the North Atlantic right whales in 2017, a new documentary on the plight of one of the region’s most endangered species may never have been made.

The last of the right whales tells the stories of many people in Canada and the United States who are committed to studying and saving the North Atlantic right whale.

Nadine Pequeneza, the director of the film from Toronto, said that before the news of the rising number of whale deaths in a single year, she didn’t even know the animal was in danger.

“It was one after the other, and it really caught my attention because initially the cause of death was not reported and the autopsies had to be done,” Pequeneza said.

The species has long been in decline, but the picture changed dramatically when 17 whales were found dead in 2017, including 12 in Canadian waters.

Since then, 34 more right whales have been found dead in Canadian and US waters.

“When it emerged that it was the ship strikes and tangles that were really causing these deaths and that they were preventable, I really started to delve into it and then saw the whole story of the incredible struggle that this species has waged throughout its history since its contact with humans, ”said Pequeneza.

Tax production

The documentary crew had to overcome a number of obstacles to shoot the film.

Like many things in life, the effort was affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, which limited when the film could be shot and the number of team members who could be in attendance.

Nadine Pequeneza, the film’s director, said the team had to overcome a number of obstacles to make the documentary. (Dan Abramovici Photography)

But even before that, filmmakers had to meet a number of conditions to even start filming.

Since it had to shoot in various locations from the Florida Keys to the Gulf of St. Lawrence, the team needed the approval of two governments.

“We had to show DFO that we were doing this in a way that would benefit the whales,” Pequeneza said.

Difficult conditions

Then, of course, there is the difficulty of filming whales in the North Atlantic.

“The North Atlantic, in particular, can be very choppy and you need calm waters for filming, especially when using an aerial drone,” Pequeneza said.

The difficulty of filming on the ocean is compounded by the need to keep away from whales.

Canadian wildlife photographer Nick Hawkins used this rc vehicle to get up close images. (The last of the right whales)

Pequeneza said one of the human subjects in the film, Canadian wildlife photographer Nick Hawkins, was instrumental in obtaining many of the impressive images featured in the documentary.

“Nick built his own rc vehicle to bring a camera closer to the whales, which is a very interesting storyline that we follow throughout the film,” Pequeneza said.

“Hard to see”

The film contains a number of scenes that would disturb whale lovers.

It includes a whale entangled in a fishing rope, badly beaten and in distress, and autopsy images of whales as scientists attempt to find out how each died.

Pequeneza said the scenes were difficult and moving to film.

“It’s hard to see, and I know it will be difficult for the public as well,” said Pequeneza.

“I’m not saying that to turn off the audience. They have to see these things.”

The film will screen in theaters in Saint John, Moncton and Miramichi on January 23 and 26.

The January 23 screening in Moncton will also include a question-and-answer session with filmmakers and scientists.

The documentary will also air on CBC TV this fall.


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US photo exhibition showcases beauty of Vietnam https://photobolsillo.com/us-photo-exhibition-showcases-beauty-of-vietnam/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/us-photo-exhibition-showcases-beauty-of-vietnam/ Award-winning photographer Tran Minh Dung, whose works have made their mark in several international competitions, exhibited his collection in the United States to raise funds for victims of Covid. Dung, 32, took eight stunning captures of Vietnamese landscapes, both rural and urban, at a photo exhibition held at the Hamon Hall Center in Texas. The […]]]>

Award-winning photographer Tran Minh Dung, whose works have made their mark in several international competitions, exhibited his collection in the United States to raise funds for victims of Covid.


Dung, 32, took eight stunning captures of Vietnamese landscapes, both rural and urban, at a photo exhibition held at the Hamon Hall Center in Texas. The show was hosted by the Vietnam Youth and Students Association in the United States from November 27 to December 18. It raised more than $ 3,000 to support Vietnamese children orphaned by the Covid crisis.

One of the images on display was of a man fishing at dawn during annual flooding in the Mekong Delta province of An Giang, famous for its rice fields lined with date palms.

“These landscape photos are part of my photographic journey, some of which have recorded great achievements at international photo awards in recent years. I would like to show the world the beauty of Vietnam’s famous tourist destinations,” Dung said.

US photo exhibition showcases beauty of Vietnam

In 2016, on a trip to Mu Cang Chai, a remote rural district in northern Yen Bai province, he photographed a Hmong woman with a rattan basket on her back walking towards rice terraces during harvest season. , while they sport a golden green see.

This photo won third prize at the Sony World Photography Awards in 2017 and other awards at the EPSON International Pano Awards 2018, Chromatic Photography Awards 2018 and EPSON International Pano Awards 2019.

US photo exhibition showcases beauty of Vietnam

Another spectacular dawn photo shows the iconic Notre Dame Cathedral in downtown HCMC bathed in the first rays of the morning. The photo was taken in 2017 before the cathedral was closed for massive restoration which is expected to be completed in 2023.

Located in a tourist area that includes the historic District 1 Central Post Office, the 140-year-old cathedral is popular with foreign and local visitors, especially during holiday periods.

US photo exhibition showcases beauty of Vietnam

This sparkling aerial capture of the ancient city of Hoi An in central Vietnam earned Dung a silver medal at the 2019 EPSON International Pano Awards.

About 30 kilometers south of Da Nang, Hoi An grew from a small rural village to Southeast Asia’s busiest trading port in the 16th century, famous for its high-quality ceramics and silk.

Today, the 400 year old town is popular for its slow pace of life and pedestrianized streets.

US photo exhibition showcases beauty of Vietnam

This photo of Hang En Waterfall, a natural wonder in Gia Lai Province in the Central Highlands, was taken in 2019.

Dung first visited the waterfall on March 1, 2019. It was raining at the time and some of his equipment was damaged. A month later, he returned to the waterfall twice on April 10-19, 2019 and managed to be in the right places at the right time to capture the majestic waterfall from above and below.

The journey to conquer Hang En Waterfall in K’bang District is a challenge for foreigners, as the path can be dangerous to walk on their own. Snakes and leeches are common on the way, but the views make up for the difficulties. The waterfall is 50 meters high. During the dry season, it has a width of about 20-30 meters. Behind the waterfall surrounded by primeval forests is a large cave home to thousands of swifts.

US photo exhibition showcases beauty of Vietnam

Another aerial shot captures tourists on a coracle visit through a forest of nipa palm trees in Cam Thanh commune, Hoi An city.

Coracle tours through the forests of nipa palm trees planted around 200 years ago have become a popular tourist activity in recent years.

The photo won the first Dung Prize in the Travel category at the 2019 Chromatic Photography Awards.

US photo exhibition showcases beauty of Vietnam

A brilliant tapestry of light and color in which cherry trees bloom in pink at K’Long K’Lanh village in central highland province of Lam Dong was taken in 2019.


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The newest in the muse class of Silversea Cruises ships https://photobolsillo.com/the-newest-in-the-muse-class-of-silversea-cruises-ships/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 16:12:11 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/the-newest-in-the-muse-class-of-silversea-cruises-ships/ As international health recommendations change often, strict sailing guidelines and protocols are updated on Silversea cruises. health and security page. For most of us, it’s probably been a while since we’ve been over thrilled about a new travel experience. Now the new 596 passengers Silver moon promises to get you there, with this latest entry […]]]>

As international health recommendations change often, strict sailing guidelines and protocols are updated on Silversea cruises. health and security page.

For most of us, it’s probably been a while since we’ve been over thrilled about a new travel experience. Now the new 596 passengers Silver moon promises to get you there, with this latest entry from Silversea Cruises having set sail earlier this year.

In addition, in mid-November, Silversea took delivery of the Argent Dawn, its tenth luxury ship. This third ship in the Muse-class series built in Fincantieri The Ancona shipyard in Italy will be launched later this coming year.

Even during these reduced pandemic times and since this 2021 snapshot, Silversea has continued to plan and roll out new projects for the Silver moon. Several years ago, Silversea invited famous photographer Steve McCurry to collaborate with the cruise line to jointly produce his book In search of elsewhere: unpublished images (covered in a previous article) and more recently in its documentation on the shipbuilding process. It’s no surprise then that McCurry’s photos feature prominently among Silver moonartwork by (as part of Silversea’s extensive art program.)

Frequent travelers will easily recognize a stunning photo of a rock temple like the Jordanian site of Petra, while one might guess that a scene of children’s hoops rolling past majestic baobab trees was taken in Madagascar. With beautifully rich crimson tones, a photo of a woman taken from the back likely represents a Buddhist temple. But where? The lack of description and location labels only adds to the mystery.

In a new documentary that guests may want to watch before setting off on a cruise, McCurry: The Pursuit of Color, director Denis Delestrac follows the photographer for several years on his travels to Silversea in his relentless quest to photograph the world. The film, which premiered last month at DOC NYC film festival, traces McCurry’s fifty-year career to his first flash of fame in 1979 by photographing the Mujahedin in Afghanistan through spooky footage of Kuwait during the Gulf War until September 11. The film follows McCurry through intimate moments such as the filming of a child playing soccer in a remote village in Papua New Guinea, and also doesn’t back down from the challenges and costs, physical and personal, of his life. itinerant.

Silversea Cruises has a long history of offering many other resources to enhance your trip from the moment you book. So, before the cruise, take some time at home for Silversea’s literary anthology series. Fairy tale with works by big names in travel such as Paul Theroux who writes on Madagascar and Pico Iyer on French Polynesia. And look for Silversea’s recommendations on exploration books, while their card program prepared in conjunction with the Royal Geographical Society will keep you engaged for hours. You can even get a head start on cruises Lecture series, which do not consist so much of full lectures as of informal discussions given by experts in all kinds of fields.

On board, a journey in itself can be a true non-stop cultural experience. If you are looking for kids and waterslides, look elsewhere. In the earlier launch Silver muse ship, the Arts Café has proven to be immensely popular. It has been slightly redesigned on the Silver Moon to be even more relaxing as a den. Patrons enjoy a wide selection of art books to browse, perhaps most comfortably in a high-back swivel chair with natural light streaming in from the cafe’s rear deck 8 position.

You could spend your entire cruise curled up with the Taschen delivered Diego Rivera, The Complete Murals, a $ 900 tome so thick you need a crew member to help you carry it if you bring it back to your private lanai. Or, hopefully, the rich surreal color boards from the only slightly less heavy Taschen publication Hieronymus Bosch. The Complete Works won’t keep your mind shaken, especially if you encounter rough seas.

Currently, most of the ten Silversea ships are operational, while an occasional last minute change in shore excursions is not surprising these days. On a Silver moon trip earlier this month from Fort Lauderdale through the Panama Canal, scheduled shore excursions from Cozumel Island off the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico to the ruins of Chichen Itza on the mainland have been canceled by operators premises due to the latest sanitary restrictions. True, local tour operators practice staggered bus seats and strict masking, politely reminding all scofflaws to join.

Belize has recently become popular for its cays and beautiful sea sinkholes, while its Mayan ruins are perhaps less well known. The Altun Ha Ruin Complex is as beautiful as any other in the Mayan world and only an hour’s drive from Belize City Marina.

On the Honduran island of Roatán, also popular now for its active tourism, a trip to the north coast took guests to the village of Punta Gorda, home to the Afro-indigenous Garifuna people known for their musical traditions. A troop performed a dance on a pier, while an elder demonstrated the making of cassava cakes. Silversea’s guests who ate a fish stew followed by grilled yellowtail snapper may have wondered if the gentleman fishing in a canoe just offshore caught them.

Given its Caribbean coast, the Costa Rican city of Puerto Limón is home, like Belize, to another English-speaking population in a predominantly Spanish kingdom. Tours there included an aerial tram tour of the rainforest and a walkway visit to the suspension bridges.

And finally, the thrill of the Panama Canal meant getting up in the dark to make your way to the Deck 11 Observation Lounge for coffee and pastries and wait for the canal to enter the city of Colón. Those dozens of container ships anchored in the Caribbean Sea most likely contained all of the world’s Christmas items. As passengers arrived, some made their way to the normally off-limits deck 12 for the ultimate view of Gatun Locks transit and for the start of the day’s journey through Gatun Lake to at the Miraflores locks, Pacific side.

On occasion, a ship’s speaker would tell via an intercom the stories behind this astonishing feat of engineering a century ago, not to mention the equally staggering cost in human lives. Once in the waters of the Pacific, anyone who has not been to Panama City for some time will be amazed at the skyline of skyscrapers towering past Miami Miami.

Regarding the Argent Dawn ship soon to sea, a holistic wellness program called Otium will be unveiled, which is sure to set another Silversea standard. Described as “the pinnacle of relaxed indulgence,” Otium is based on Roman concepts and practices of sybaritic living in food and wine, music, poetry, and art. It’s not about sweating calories, in other words.

Silversea ordered newly designed custom mattresses as part of the experience, which includes treats such as a bubbly bath with dim lighting or your butler delivering a cashmere blanket to your veranda with drinkable bubbles or hot chocolate and popcorn with truffles. And caviar, there is always caviar.

As each new Silversea Cruises ship arrives, new developments follow. Last I heard, the cruise line announced that its first hybrid ship, the Silver Nova, will be launched in 2023. Construction of the vessel is underway in northern Germany Meyer werft luxury shipyards.

Which means there is no rest in this New Year for the creative teams at Silversea.


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The success of the competition stuns the photographer | Otago Daily Times News Online https://photobolsillo.com/the-success-of-the-competition-stuns-the-photographer-otago-daily-times-news-online/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 15:30:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/the-success-of-the-competition-stuns-the-photographer-otago-daily-times-news-online/ Mt Cook-based Conservation Department Ranger Hunter Smith describes his victory at the Geography of New Zealand Photographer of the Year is awarded as “absolutely unreal”. Mr Smith (25) was one of 54 finalists, down from around 6,000 nominations for this year’s awards, which were decided earlier this month. Her photograph of contrasting wild pines, taken […]]]>
Mt Cook-based Conservation Department Ranger Hunter Smith describes his victory at the Geography of New Zealand Photographer of the Year is awarded as “absolutely unreal”.

Mr Smith (25) was one of 54 finalists, down from around 6,000 nominations for this year’s awards, which were decided earlier this month. Her photograph of contrasting wild pines, taken by drone near the Ohau A power station, won the aerial photography category, which was won last year by Emma Willetts of Oamaru.

Mr Smith, who moved south to Rotorua about three years ago, said photography was a passion he only discovered relatively recently.

“I kind of always had the creative side of me.

“It didn’t really click that photography was something I could do, because it always seemed like a lot of money, and I was never in the right space for it.”

Since purchasing a camera, however, Mr. Smith hasn’t looked back, and a Pure Photo Adventures workshop with his photography “idols” Rach Stewart, Lee Cook and Daniel Murray three years ago. , prompted him to move south.

“I was like, ‘Yeah, it’s me, I’m going.’ So I did,” he said.

Landscape and astrophotography are must-haves for nature lovers, and working and living in the Mackenzie Basin provided plenty of opportunities for both, he said.

“I love being in nature, for sure. I’m a person who loves the outdoors.”

Mr. Smith would love to become a full-time photographer, but he knew that portraiture was where most photographers succeeded in making a living.

“If I start to absolutely improve my game and keep exploring, it might move me forward.

“I have a feeling that since I’ve been here, I probably have my name a little more there than in the north, because the small communities work like magic.”

The people he lived in had been very supportive of him and he loved to share his work with them, he said.

“I share with them what I see and how I see the Mackenzie through my eyes.”

Mr Smith entered his image of the contrasting pines in the NZ Geo contest because he believed it matched the images he had seen in the past. He had entered the previous years, but had never had a return.

“When I got the email telling me I was a finalist, I was like, ‘Are you sure? Did you make a mistake? “Yes, it was so surreal.”

He traveled to Auckland for the announcement and tried not to hope too much, though he thought he had “devious clues” that he could have won.

When the announcement was made, Mr Smith said his “heart was beating like crazy”.

“I couldn’t believe it – absolutely unreal.”

He received a trophy, a certificate and a cash prize.

Ashley smyth


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Our Favorite Photos from 2021: How Guardian US Photos Captured a Historic Year | US News https://photobolsillo.com/our-favorite-photos-from-2021-how-guardian-us-photos-captured-a-historic-year-us-news/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/our-favorite-photos-from-2021-how-guardian-us-photos-captured-a-historic-year-us-news/ In 2021, our photographers told some of America’s deepest stories. They captured personal moments, like a man assessing the remains of his home after Hurricane Ida. There were inspiring stories, like how a predominantly black high school created a girls’ lacrosse team during the pandemic. And there have been historical scenes, like the preparation for […]]]>

In 2021, our photographers told some of America’s deepest stories. They captured personal moments, like a man assessing the remains of his home after Hurricane Ida. There were inspiring stories, like how a predominantly black high school created a girls’ lacrosse team during the pandemic. And there have been historical scenes, like the preparation for the presidential nomination just weeks after insurgents tried to overturn the election results. Thanks to all the photographers who have worked with us this year.


The city of Baltimore is suing oil and gas companies for their role in the climate crisis, which has had a disproportionate impact on the community of color. The image below shows Karen Lewis, who says her townhouse in Baltimore can get so hot that she sometimes has trouble breathing.

Photographer: Greg kahn


Photographer Filip Wolak took aerial photos of mass Covid-19 vaccination sites in the United States. The Delta Flight Museum in Atlanta has been selected as one of Georgia’s four mass vaccination sites as of February 22, 2021.

Photographer: Philippe Wolak

The Delta Flight Museum in Atlanta has been selected as one of Georgia's four mass vaccination sites as of February 22, 2021.

Raw sewage leaks in Virginia threatened the livelihoods of the few remaining black oyster farmers on the East Coast. These leaks can be seen flowing through neighborhoods, like this culvert that connects the historic African-American neighborhood of Pughsville to the larger drainage system. Below, five-year-old Braxton Miller swings over the water.

Photographer: Alyssa Schukar

Braxton Miller, five, swinging over the water.

In some mosques, women are not allowed to pray in the same room as men; in some mosques women cannot even pray indoors. But Los Angeles imams are pushing those boundaries with mixed congregation mosques and LBGTQ mosques, and using their sermons to address topics such as sexual violence and pregnancy loss. Below, Nurjahan Boulden, Tasneem Noor and Samia Bano after praying together in Venice, California.

Photographer: Anna boyiazis

Nurjahan Boulden, Tasneem Noor and Samia Bano after praying together on November 12, 2021 in Venice, California.

The Guardian asked photographer Jordan Gale to document the preparations for the presidential inauguration, which occurred just weeks after insurgents attempted to overturn election results on January 6, 2021. Doors below steel block blocking parts of Pennsylvania Avenue leading to the US Capitol and a woman looking through a security checkpoint.

Photographer: Jordan gale

Preparations for the inauguration

Four close dams in eastern Washington state interfere with salmon migration. Below, salmon are seen swimming in the viewing area of ​​the Lower Granite Dam Fish Ladder Visitor Center in Pomeroy, Wash.

Photographer: Mason Trinca

Salmon are seen swimming in the viewing area of ​​the Lower Granite Dam Fish Ladder Visitor Center in Pomeroy, Wash.

In this photo essay on the precarious nature of America’s safety net, Cherokeena Robinson, 32 – who lost her job during the pandemic – lies in bed with her son Mai’Kel Stephens, 6, at their halfway house in San Pedro, Calif., Where they share with one or two other families at a time.

Photographer: Rachel Bujalski

Cherokeena Robinson, 32 - who lost her job during the pandemic - lies in bed with her son Mai'Kel Stephens, 6, at their halfway house in San Pedro, Calif., Which they share with one or two other families at the same time.

In Haines, Alaska, a mining project promised jobs, but some fear the mine contamination could destroy the salmon runs they depend on. In the photo below, a seagull hovers over hundreds of spawning chum salmon in a swamp on the Chilkat River just below the Tlingit village of Klukwan.

Photographer: Pierre Mather

A seagull flies over hundreds of spawning chum salmon in a swamp on the Chilkat River just below the Tlingit village of Klukwan.

For American-Palestinian Muslims, the conclusion of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan is meant to be a time of celebration. This year, the violence in Gaza and Jerusalem has turned it into a grim event. Pictured on the left is Tiffany Cabán, who will eventually win a seat on New York City Council. Muslims greet each other after the morning prayers of Eid al-Fitr.

Photographer: Ismail Ferdous

Left: Tiffany Caban.  Right: Muslims greet each other after the morning prayers of Eid al-Fitr.

Billions of periodic cicadas have emerged this year after a 17-year dormancy underground along the eastern United States. In the photo below, cicadas invade trees near a house in Columbia, Maryland.

Photographer: Gabriella Demczuk

Cicadas invade trees near a house in Columbia, Md. In May.

Detroit Cass Technical High School, where the student body is 85 percent black, offered only three spring sports for girls – until a group of girls asked the administration to add lacrosse. It was a unique request; although this is a Native American game, most of the participants are white. This story tells the story of this team’s two-year journey to step onto the pitch and eventually win. Below clockwise, Kayla Carroll-Williams, 15, Zahria Liggans, 18, Alexia Carroll-Williams, 17, and Deja Crenshaw, 18.

Photographer: Sylvie Jarrus

Clockwise;  Kayla Carroll-Williams, 15, Zahria Liggans, 18, Alexia Carroll-Williams, 17, Deja Crenshaw, 18, on the grounds of Cass Technical High School in Detroit, Michigan on May 1, 2021.

In 2012, the South African chemical company Sasol announced plans to build a complex in Mossville, Louisiana. They bought out the homes of the people who lived on the land, but analysis found that they were offering black homeowners far less money than white homeowners. The image on the right shows Eyphit Hadnot, 58, and his older brother Dellar Hadnot, 61. The Hadnot family lived in Mossville for 80 years when Sasol offered them the buyout, which they rejected. On the left is a piece of land where a house stood before Sasol leveled the building.

Photographer: Christian K Lee

Eyphit Hadnot, 58, and his older brother Dellar Hadnot, 61.  The Hadnot family lived in Mossville for 80 years when Sasol offered them the buyout, which they rejected.  On the left is a piece of land where a house stood before Sasol leveled the building.

The communities of Pointe-aux-Chênes and Isle de Jean Charles suffered some of the worst destruction caused by Hurricane Ida. This left a difficult question: stay to rebuild, or leave? The photo shows Kip de’Laune searching for any salvageable items at his Point-Aux-Chenes home after Hurricane Ida.

Photographer: Bryan tarnowski

The photo shows Kip de'Laune searching for any salvageable items at his Point-Aux-Chenes home after Hurricane Ida.

After Hurricane Sandy, Kimberly White Smalls hoped the city would help her rebuild her home in New York’s Far Rockaway neighborhood. Instead, the only option left for him was to sell the house to the city. Below, Smalls’ grandsons – Donovan E Smalls, 9, left, and Kelsey E Smalls Jr, 8 – running down the street in Far Rockaway, Queens.

Photographer: Krisanne johnson

Kimberly White Smalls' grandsons - Donovan E Smalls, 9, left, and Kelsey E Smalls Jr, 8 - running down the street in Far Rockaway, Queens.


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Adventureland theme park sold, new attractions to open in 2022 https://photobolsillo.com/adventureland-theme-park-sold-new-attractions-to-open-in-2022/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 02:30:25 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/adventureland-theme-park-sold-new-attractions-to-open-in-2022/ Long-time local property of Adventureland in Altoona, Iowa, has sold the resort. However, that might not be bad news if the other information revealed today is any indication. Adventureland, located just off I-80 in central Iowa, has been in operation since 1974, when Jack Krantz founded the company. From the land of adventure website, Krantz […]]]>

Long-time local property of Adventureland in Altoona, Iowa, has sold the resort. However, that might not be bad news if the other information revealed today is any indication.

Adventureland, located just off I-80 in central Iowa, has been in operation since 1974, when Jack Krantz founded the company. From the land of adventure website, Krantz passed away 15 years ago and since then his daughter and sons have continued the family business. Today’s announcement of the sale of Adventureland to one of the world’s leading amusement park operators put an end to this transaction.

Palace Entertainment, a subsidiary of Parques Reunidos, announced on Tuesday the acquisition of Adventureland Resort. In one Press releasePalace Entertainment CEO John Reilly said

We are delighted to add Adventureland to our portfolio. We specialize in parks and places that create lifelong experiences, from childhood to adulthood, parenthood and grandparents. We are investing in Adventureland to expand its current lineup to include eight new family rides in 2022, as well as two brand new attractions for the 2023 season.

Yes, 10 new rides / attractions at Adventureland over the next two years.

From 2022, Adventureland Platinum Season membership holders will be able to visit all other Palace Entertainment parks for free. Including Noah’s Ark Water Park in Wisconsin Dells, which bills itself as America’s largest water park.

Making the announcement today, Pascal Ferracci, CEO of Parques Reunidos, the parent company of Palace Entertainment, said:

We look forward to our Palace Entertainment team combining operational excellence with Adventureland’s family entertainment heritage. Parques Reunidos has a unique history of acquiring and successfully integrating parks, with more than 20 transactions carried out in 11 countries since 2004. This will continue to be a growth lever for the group, while maintaining local brands and historical positioning. fleets acquired while benefiting from advanced tools and capacities to further develop the business.

Current Adventureland CEO Michael Krantz says it’s time to pass the torch:

For almost fifty years, our family has worked hard to provide good times for people of all ages who come to the park to create lasting memories. Palace wishes to carry on these traditions so that future generations can do the same. It would make our father incredibly happy.

Eastern Iowa Theme Park Takes Exciting Steps Toward 2022 Opening

Did the Krantz family decide to sell because they realized that by 2022, it would no longer be the only theme park in Iowa? We’ll probably never know if the impending opening of the Lost Island theme park in Waterloo has something to do with it, but one thing’s for sure … we have to thank the Krantz family for giving people across the Midwest a place to stay. wonderful to visit. for almost 50 years. Hopefully this tradition will continue under the new owner for decades to come.

WATCH: See the photos of the year for the International Photography Awards

LOOK: Things from the year you were born that no longer exist

Iconic (and sometimes silly) toys, technologies and electronics have been usurped since their official entry, either through technological advancements or through breakthroughs in common sense. See how many things on this list trigger childhood memories – and those that were there and gone so quickly you missed them completely.


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2021 Complete Video Production Super Bundle is available for a huge offer just for a few hours https://photobolsillo.com/2021-complete-video-production-super-bundle-is-available-for-a-huge-offer-just-for-a-few-hours/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 15:46:27 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/2021-complete-video-production-super-bundle-is-available-for-a-huge-offer-just-for-a-few-hours/ If you are looking to produce professional videos or are looking for a career in photography and videography, we have an amazing offer for you here. Wccftech has a limited time discount offer on the 2021 Full Video Production Super Bundle. This offer will expire in a few hours, so get it right away. Features […]]]>

If you are looking to produce professional videos or are looking for a career in photography and videography, we have an amazing offer for you here. Wccftech has a limited time discount offer on the 2021 Full Video Production Super Bundle. This offer will expire in a few hours, so get it right away.

Features of the 2021 Full Video Production Super Bundle

The set is huge and contains ten courses to help you learn more about video production. You’ll learn about screenwriting, videography, cinematography, and more. All courses have been designed by experts with years of experience. Here are the highlights of what the 2021 Full Video Production Super Bundle has in store for you:

  • The complete video production bootcamp
    Learn professional shooting and editing techniques and how to create an audience
  • Create valuable video content that sells
    Create engaging, professional-looking video content for any medium
  • Master Class on digital products
    Create, launch and market your own online business with digital products like online courses, coaching, e-books, webinars, and more.
  • Wedding video
    Become a successful videographer or wedding photographer
  • Webcam videography
    Learn how to use simple, inexpensive tools to shoot professional webcam videos
  • Scriptwriting Master Class
    Master the entire screenwriting process and turn your idea into a great screenplay
  • YouTube master class
    Develop a Youtube channel from scratch and turn it into a revenue machine
  • Cinematography Master Class: Start Filming Better Videos Now
    Shoot better videos as you learn the video production techniques used by Hollywood filmmakers
  • Sony cameras for beginners
    Improve your photography by learning to confidently use your Sony mirrorless camera
  • Drones: learn the basics of aerial photography and videography
    Capture stunning aerial images using a quadcopter

Original price 2021 Super full video production package: $ 2,000
Wccftech Discount Price 2021 Full Video Production Super Bundle: $ 34.99


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Dramatic footage shows the extent of erosion on the Norfolk coast https://photobolsillo.com/dramatic-footage-shows-the-extent-of-erosion-on-the-norfolk-coast/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 11:46:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/dramatic-footage-shows-the-extent-of-erosion-on-the-norfolk-coast/ Posted: 11:46 December 17, 2021 The before and after photos show how drastic the changes have been on our coastline in just ten years. Local photographer Mike Page took bird’s eye views of some of Norfolk’s landmarks and coastline over the past decades. Recently Mr. Page stepped out again – and the view from the […]]]>

Posted:
11:46 December 17, 2021



The before and after photos show how drastic the changes have been on our coastline in just ten years.

Local photographer Mike Page took bird’s eye views of some of Norfolk’s landmarks and coastline over the past decades.

Recently Mr. Page stepped out again – and the view from the sky shows the effect the weather has had on the beaches of Winterton and Happisburgh.


2011: Winterton Beach was only a short walk from the sand dunes and the Dunes Cafe was still in place by the sea.
– Credit: Mike Page

Ten years ago, Winterton Beach was accessible from the dunes after a short descent to shore.

Ancient landmarks such as the Dunes Cafe were still visible from the air in 2011.

Only a decade later, the beach was cut off from the dunes as erosion created a steep drop off a cliff.

After the choppy waters caused further erosion of the Cliffs of Winterton, the cafe had to be demolished in 2020.


2021: Winterton beach is inaccessible from the sand dunes, as the formation of soft sandy cliffs has a steep slope.

2021: Winterton beach is inaccessible from the sand dunes, as the formation of soft sandy cliffs has a steep slope.
– Credit: Mike Page

Over the past decade many homes in Happisburgh have been overrun by sea and ten years of erosion has taken their toll on the landscape.

Experts predict that 50 meters of land will be lost by 2035 in the village.


2011: Erosion is already evident in Happisburgh, but many people still live near the edge.

2011: Erosion is already evident in Happisburgh, but many people still live near the edge.
– Credit: Mike Page


2021: The cliffs of Happisburgh move further west as the sea demands more and more land.

2021: The cliffs of Happisburgh move further west as the sea demands more and more land.
– Credit: Mike Page


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Stuff Photographer Wins New Zealand Geographic Photographer of the Year https://photobolsillo.com/stuff-photographer-wins-new-zealand-geographic-photographer-of-the-year/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 00:05:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/stuff-photographer-wins-new-zealand-geographic-photographer-of-the-year/ A Things visual journalist won a prestigious photography competition. Braden Fastier, photojournalist at Nelson Courier and founding member of the Toru Photography Collective, was crowned New Zealand Geographic Photographer of the Year for a broad portfolio of social documentaries. Fastier said it was “pretty cool” to receive the award for best photographer, given the “incredible” […]]]>

A Things visual journalist won a prestigious photography competition.

Braden Fastier, photojournalist at Nelson Courier and founding member of the Toru Photography Collective, was crowned New Zealand Geographic Photographer of the Year for a broad portfolio of social documentaries.

Fastier said it was “pretty cool” to receive the award for best photographer, given the “incredible” work on display at the awards ceremony on Wednesday night.

“It’s what you look for every day, it’s for print and for the web, but getting that recognition is pretty awesome. “

READ MORE:
* “Right place with the right lens”: photojournalist Stuff Alden Williams wins prestigious award
* The NZ Geographic Photographer of the Year exhibition presents “a year in Aotearoa”
* Four Stuff Photographers shortlisted for the New Zealand Geographic Award
* Collective focus on Nelson’s life in a new photography exhibition

Stuff Photographer Braden Fastier is New Zealand Geographic Photographer of the Year 2021.

Braden Fastier / Stuff

Stuff Photographer Braden Fastier is New Zealand Geographic Photographer of the Year 2021.

Fastier first won the Nikon Photographer of the Year award and also won the Resene Color award.

He said he chose his portfolio carefully, putting aside his favorite photos each month and chatting with friends and colleagues.

“It’s just to find the time to polish… there’s a lot of photography, it’s everywhere. There are millions of photos uploaded every day, so you wonder, “how is this going to be different from something someone took on their phone?” “

Stuff's regional editor Victoria Guild said Fastier's attention to detail sets him apart.

Braden Fastier / Stuff

Stuff’s regional editor Victoria Guild said Fastier’s attention to detail sets him apart.

“I approach every job with the attitude that there’s going to be a really amazing photo here, you just might have to look a little harder for that.”

ThingsNelson’s regional editor Victoria Guild said it was Fastier’s attention to detail that set him apart.

“Braden is always committed to producing the best possible image, and that is reflected in the quality of his work. He has a style that is instantly recognizable and we are very fortunate to be able to showcase his work in our print products and online.

In a statement released Wednesday evening, New Zealand Geographic editor James Frankham said Fastier’s images were rich in color and context, were technically sound and demonstrated an original and imaginative approach to photojournalism.

New Zealand Geographic editor James Frankham said Braden Fastier's images were rich in color and context.

Braden Fastier / Stuff

New Zealand Geographic editor James Frankham said Braden Fastier’s images were rich in color and context.

“Fastier’s images captured a second level of meaning – the humor of the paperwork around a pair of concrete playground seals, a mask on a statue, phone calls on a golf course – the realities oddities of life in Aotearoa in 2021 that go some way to understand the year that has been.

“His approach borrows from street photography, but with the discipline and talent for storytelling of a photojournalist, values ​​that make Braden Fastier a worthy holder of the title of Photographer of the Year 2021.”

New Zealand Geographic has received more than 6,000 nominations for the title of Photographer of the Year this season, a record in the 13-year history of the competition.

“2021 started out as a cure for 2020, but in many ways it felt like a repeat of history. This was reflected in the registrations we received. There were images of more blockages, more protests and cultural themes were also close to last year – Covid-19, Black Lives Matter and a process of adjusting to smaller, more isolated lives. “

Fastier said he approached every job with the idea that there would be an amazing photo, he just had to look for it.

Braden Fastier / Stuff

Fastier said he approached every job with the idea that there would be an amazing photo, he just had to look for it.

“The images also reflected, however, our resilience as a nation, our creativity and our determination. There were landscapes of quiet solitude, without the rush of tourists. There were images of small circles of family and friends. Even the images of wild animals were silent and careful studies of behavior, marked by the patience of the photographer. “

2021 winners

Nikon Photographer of the Year – Braden Fastier

Young Photographer of the Year – Mattheus Elwood

Ockham Residential People’s Choice – Grant Nicholson

Resene Color Award – Braden Fastier

Electric Kiwi Wildlife – Danilo Hegg

Resene Landscape – William Patino

Lumix Company – George Heard

Built Environment Resene – Matthew Connolly

Progear PhotoStory – Ralph Piezas

Aerial Lightforce – Hunter Smith



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