Aerial photographer – Photo Bolsillo http://photobolsillo.com/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 17:45:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://photobolsillo.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Aerial photographer – Photo Bolsillo http://photobolsillo.com/ 32 32 Aerial photos of Watford, Rickmansworth School and South Oxhey https://photobolsillo.com/aerial-photos-of-watford-rickmansworth-school-and-south-oxhey/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/aerial-photos-of-watford-rickmansworth-school-and-south-oxhey/ Watford Fire Station is now located in Lower High Street, but 20 years ago it was located next to a roundabout at one of the main entrances to the town. In June 2003, former Watford Observer photographer Pete Stevens flew with Firecrest Aviation from Elstree to photograph the town and surrounding area. During his flight […]]]>

Watford Fire Station is now located in Lower High Street, but 20 years ago it was located next to a roundabout at one of the main entrances to the town.

In June 2003, former Watford Observer photographer Pete Stevens flew with Firecrest Aviation from Elstree to photograph the town and surrounding area.

During his flight he captured the images on this page which show the fire station at his former home at the junction of Rickmansworth Road and Whippendell Road.

Watford Observer: An aerial view of the Royal Masonic School in RickmansworthAn aerial view of the Royal Masonic School in Rickmansworth (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation Elstree)

We’ve been watching these aerial photos over the past month, with views of the city centre, Watford FC, Leavesden Studios and The Grove, among others.

Watford Observer: Croxley and Watford business parks.Croxley and Watford business parks. (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation Elstree)

The city center features again this week, as do aerial shots of Watford and Croxley business parks, Arches Retail Park, Royal Masonic School for Girls in Rickmansworth, Watford Grammar School for Boys and South Oxhey.

READ MORE: What Harry Potter’s house looked like from above 20 years ago

Watford Observer: A spectacular view from above the A412 leading to Rickmansworth Road and Whippendell Road.A spectacular view from above of the A412 leading to Rickmansworth Road and Whippendell Road. (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation Elstree)

Watford Observer: The railway line leads to Watford Met station in the top left of this image.The railway line leads to Watford Met Station towards the top left of this image. (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation Elstree)

Watford Observer: Watford Grammar School for Boys is at the top of this image.Watford Grammar School for Boys is at the top of this image. (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation Elstree)

Watford Observer: A view of the city center from above the YMCA.A view of downtown above the YMCA. (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation Elstree)

Watford Observer: Tesco is in the lower right of this view with the Arches at the top.Tesco is in the lower right of this view with the Arches at the top. (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation Elstree)

Watford Observer: An aerial view of South Oxhey 20 years ago.An aerial view of South Oxhey 20 years ago. (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation Elstree)

Watford Observer: A view of Carpenders Park station.A view of Carpenders Park station. (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation Elstree)

]]>
The Ukrainian Female Soldier Behind Iconic Invasion Photos https://photobolsillo.com/the-ukrainian-female-soldier-behind-iconic-invasion-photos/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 18:48:30 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/the-ukrainian-female-soldier-behind-iconic-invasion-photos/ Iryna Rybakova’s photographs have been published in media around the world, but the use of her camera is only part of her job as a second lieutenant and press attaché in the Ukrainian army. While explaining the circumstances of her most famous photo, Iryna Rybakova inserts a detail that underlines her personal closeness to the […]]]>

Iryna Rybakova’s photographs have been published in media around the world, but the use of her camera is only part of her job as a second lieutenant and press attaché in the Ukrainian army.

While explaining the circumstances of her most famous photo, Iryna Rybakova inserts a detail that underlines her personal closeness to the Ukrainian war effort.

Photo by Iryna Rybakova / Ukrainian Armed Forces.

The image above of a skull-shaped turret from a destroyed Russian tank, the 38-year-old says, was taken with a drone in March after Ukrainian troops recaptured the village of Husarivka in the Kharkiv region after a fierce fight.

“I’m just asking you to remember,” Rybakova said, “many of my comrades died in that battle.”

The photographer then names the soldiers, Yulian Stupak and Oleksandr Garbuz, who were posthumously awarded Ukraine’s highest honor for their actions during the takeover.

Iryna Rybakova. Courtesy picture.
Iryna Rybakova. Courtesy picture.

Rybakova is one of several Ukrainian army press officers whose job it is to facilitate journalists’ visits to frontline posts. The junior lieutenant of the 93rd Mechanized Brigade stands out for repeatedly capturing his own footage that has become iconic of the war and earned his brigade a massive following on social media.

Soldiers prepare munitions shortly before the Russian invasion in February. Photo by Iryna Rybakova / Ukrainian Armed Forces.

After the photo of the tank turret “skull” appeared on the cover of The Economist, Rybakova says the image “began to gain popularity. It was turned into a tattoo, placed on album covers and turned into T-shirts.

A cemetery destroyed by artillery in Bakhmut in October. Photo by Iryna Rybakova / Ukrainian Armed Forces.

More recently, an image Rybakova posted in October of an explosion crater inside a cemetery in Bakhmut was widely shared on social media as an example of the limitless physical destruction wrought by the Russian invasion. Such frontline aerial footage is now rare due to the ban on civilian drone use and the high likelihood that an unidentified quadcopter could be shot down from the sky.

Two soldiers fly a drone from a position in a house at an unnamed location in October. Photo by Iryna Rybakova / Ukrainian Armed Forces.

Even with her position in the military, she says she has to go through several stages before she can fly her DJI Mavic Air 2.

“I inform the battalion leadership that I will raise a drone in a certain area, and they warn the positions: At a certain time, at a certain place, our ‘bird’ flies,” she says.

The Ukrainian flag and that of the Ukrainian Insurgent Army (left) pictured near the front lines of the fight between Ukrainian forces and Russian-backed separatists in 2019. Photo by Iryna Rybakova/Ukrainian Armed Forces.

Rybakova said RFE/RL she started taking pictures in high school when she used her bathroom as a makeshift darkroom. During the 10 years she spent working as a journalist in Ukraine, she maintained photography as a hobby, using a range of cameras, including medium format film cameras that record sharp negatives and the size of a cracker.

A Ukrainian soldier walks near the tail of a Tochka U ballistic missile in the Kharkiv region in April. Photo by Iryna Rybakova / Ukrainian Armed Forces.

In 2015, when the journalist joined Carpathian Sich, which at the time was a volunteer paramilitary group linked to an ultra-nationalist political party, Rybakova says her photography skills immediately came in handy. She now serves in the Ukrainian 93rd Mechanized Brigade as a press officer and second lieutenant.

A Ukrainian soldier paints the ‘Z’ of a captured Russian armored vehicle. Photo by Iryna Rybakova / Ukrainian Armed Forces.

Rybakova says that after eight years of low-level conflict in eastern Ukraine, the full-throated invasion of Moscow in February came as a shock.

“To be honest, we in the army thought we were just going to go to the borders instead of the border guards, prepare a defensive line and hold our position for several months,” she says. “[We thought] perhaps there would be provocations with automatic weapon fire, but nothing more.

A damaged monument to a World War II battle between Soviet and Nazi forces stands above the wreckage of a modern armored vehicle in the recaptured town of Trostyanka in Ukraine’s Sumy region in March. Photo by Iryna Rybakova / Ukrainian Armed Forces.

The photographer and soldier felt all the fury of war. On February 26, minutes after arriving in the newly recaptured town of Okhtyrka in the Sumy region, Rybakova says she plunged onto the asphalt as a Russian plane dropped what she says was a bomb FAB-3000 on a nearby Ukrainian military position, killing many people. people.

The 3-tonne unguided bomb exploded with such force, she said, that it was “like it was an earthquake or a pit in hell” had opened. A photo of the aftermath of this explosion shows a water-filled crater the size of a large swimming pool.

A mud-stained Ukrainian tank driver at an undisclosed location in October. Photo by Iryna Rybakova / Ukrainian Armed Forces.

When asked about her most vivid experience documenting the war, the photographer’s response illustrates the ruthless new outlook of many Ukrainians who saw their country ravaged by invasion.

“On the 24th, in Okhtyrka, the boys encountered an enemy column and completely destroyed it,” Rybakova recalls. “They took me to see dead Russians. One of them was officer Ilyasov, of Buryat nationality. He was killed by a 19 year old [Ukrainian] soldier. The corpse was thrown off the road and covered with grass.

Freshly picked wildflowers lie next to a shrapnel-torn tree. Photo by Iryna Rybakova / Ukrainian Armed Forces.

“That night I finally slept normally,” Rybakova said when she saw the dead officer. “The sight of enemy corpses calmed me down.”


About the Author: Amos Chapple is a Kiwi who photographs and writes for Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. It has been published in most major news titles around the world. You can find more of his work on his website. This article was also published on RFE/RL.

]]>
Aerial photos of Leavesden Studios, The Grove and the M1/M25 junction https://photobolsillo.com/aerial-photos-of-leavesden-studios-the-grove-and-the-m1-m25-junction/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/aerial-photos-of-leavesden-studios-the-grove-and-the-m1-m25-junction/ Although it was another seven years before movie giants Warner Bros bought Leavesden Studios, it had already become the home of Harry Potter when these photos were taken. In June 2003, former Watford Observer photographer Pete Stevens flew with Firecrest Aviation from Elstree to photograph the town and surrounding area. During his flight he captured […]]]>

Although it was another seven years before movie giants Warner Bros bought Leavesden Studios, it had already become the home of Harry Potter when these photos were taken.

In June 2003, former Watford Observer photographer Pete Stevens flew with Firecrest Aviation from Elstree to photograph the town and surrounding area.

During his flight he captured the images on this page which show the studio complex a few months after principal photography began for Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, the third installment in the hit film series.

We started watching this aerial footage last month, with views of Watford FC, the city center and Watford Junction.

In addition to images of the studios, scroll through the photos below for views of The Grove hotel and golf course and the intersection of the M1 and M25 motorways.

Watford Observer: The old runway at Leavesden Aerodrome is at the top left of the image.The old runway at Leavesden Aerodrome is at the top left of the image. (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation Elstree)

We’ll be bringing you more fantastic aerial photos of Watford and the surrounding area from 2003 over the coming weeks.

Watford Observer: An overhead view of the Leavesden area.A higher view of the Leavesden area. (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation Elstree)

Read more:

What Watford FC looked like 20 years ago

12 stunning images showing Watford from the sky 20 years ago

Watford Observer: This view shows how relatively small the studio complex was 20 years ago.This view shows how relatively small the studio complex was 20 years ago. (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation Elstree)

Watford Observer: Another traffic jam on the motorway.Another traffic jam on the highway. (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation Elstree)

Watford Observer: A spectacular view of the M1/M25 junction.A spectacular view of the M1/M25 junction. (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation Elstree)

Watford Observer: Much of The Grove resort was still a building site in 2003.Much of The Grove resort was still under construction in 2003. (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation Elstree)

Watford Observer: The road leading to the hotel is visible in the center of this photo.The road leading to the hotel is visible in the center of this photo. (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation Elstree)

Watford Observer: The full extent of the golf course can be seen in this image.The full extent of the golf course can be seen in this image. (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation Elstree)

Watford Observer: Another view of the hotel and golf course from above.Another view of the hotel and golf course from above. (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation Elstree)

]]>
Lincoln cardiologists are back at the heart hospital https://photobolsillo.com/lincoln-cardiologists-are-back-at-the-heart-hospital/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 16:30:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/lincoln-cardiologists-are-back-at-the-heart-hospital/ Nearly three years after their privileges were suspended, a group of Lincoln cardiologists are being welcomed back into the city’s specialty cardiology hospital. CHI Health announced Wednesday that physicians at Pioneer Heart Institute now have the privilege of performing procedures at CHI Health Nebraska Heart. Pioneer, which has 17 doctors, was formed in 2018 by […]]]>

Nearly three years after their privileges were suspended, a group of Lincoln cardiologists are being welcomed back into the city’s specialty cardiology hospital.

CHI Health announced Wednesday that physicians at Pioneer Heart Institute now have the privilege of performing procedures at CHI Health Nebraska Heart.

Pioneer, which has 17 doctors, was formed in 2018 by a group of cardiologists who were previously based at the heart hospital.

The split was described as amicable at the time, and the doctors continued to have privileges at Nebraska Heart for the next 18 months.

Pioneer Heart doctors are no longer able to perform procedures at the heart hospital

Lincoln hospitals feel crunch due to respiratory illnesses

But in January 2020, doctors lost their privileges after what CHI Health described as an “exclusive agreement” with its own doctors to provide cardiac services at the hospital, which management said was the norm before the departure of the Pioneer doctors.

People also read…

It’s unclear what has changed, although the heart hospital is now under new management, with Dr. Rick Thompson taking over as president this summer.

“As a specialty cardiac hospital with more than four decades of patient and family care, CHI Health Nebraska Heart ensures patient access to quality care, superior outcomes, and a place where patients always go. first,” Thompson said in a press release. will now offer more patients the choice to receive this exceptional care close to home.

Dr. Douglas Netz, a Pioneer Heart cardiologist, said in the statement that he and his colleagues “look forward to collaborating with CHI Health Nebraska Heart.”

“Providers and staff at Pioneer Heart Institute have eagerly awaited the opportunity to provide more comprehensive cardiology care options to patients in the Lincoln area,” Netz said.

RSV cases soar in Lincoln, straining hospital capacity

The pandemic has sent Nebraska patients from providers in the exam room to the IT platform. What future for telehealth?

Contact the writer at 402-473-2647 or molberding@journalstar.com.

On Twitter @LincolnBizBuzz.

]]>
In the lush Amazon, a photographer hopes to document life before it’s too late https://photobolsillo.com/in-the-lush-amazon-a-photographer-hopes-to-document-life-before-its-too-late/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 19:10:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/in-the-lush-amazon-a-photographer-hopes-to-document-life-before-its-too-late/ Updated November 3, 2022 2:45 PM ET Ed. Note: This story includes photos that show nudity. When photographer Sebastião Salgado visits tribes in the Amazon, he says the people he meets tend not to be interested in his cameras or his satellite phone: “They were very interested in my knife, because that my knife has […]]]>

Updated November 3, 2022 2:45 PM ET

Ed. Note: This story includes photos that show nudity.

When photographer Sebastião Salgado visits tribes in the Amazon, he says the people he meets tend not to be interested in his cameras or his satellite phone: “They were very interested in my knife, because that my knife has a use for them,” he said. .

Originally from Brazil, Salgado has made more than 58 trips to the Amazon. His photos depict lush tropical trees, dramatic clouds, the winding river, as well as the biodiversity of the jungle. The 78-year-old photographer says he flew with the Brazilian army over some of the most inaccessible areas to capture them with his camera.

His new photo exhibition, Amazon, is on view in Los Angeles at the California Science Center. Two large gallery spaces are filled with over 200 large-scale black-and-white images that look almost backlit. Salgado says he photographed them, as he always does, using natural light. “I don’t know how to use artificial lights,” he says.

The images are accompanied by an Amazonian soundscape of birds, monkeys, insects, frogs and human voices, all mixed with music composed for the exhibition by French musician Jean-Michel Jarre.

“It’s a beautiful exhibit. The images are enchanting,” said Jeffrey Rudolph, president and CEO of the California Science Center.

“You learn a lot about the forest, unexpected things about the Amazon. The mountains, the flying rivers,” says Rudolph. “The Amazon is a unique system in which it creates its own rain. Trees take their roots up to 60 meters deep, get water from the system and that water evaporates. At the end of the day, you get these huge clouds and huge rains.”

In some photos you can see these rain clouds above the tree canopy, huge waterfalls and misty peaks.

“The Amazon is paradise,” says Salgado. “The light is amazing, the clouds amazing, the people amazing.”

Salgado lives in Paris and has traveled to over 130 countries, capturing images of genocide, famine, war and natural disasters. But he always returns to Brazil, where he grew up in another tropical forest, along the Atlantic.

For years he and his wife Lelia worked to restore part of the Atlantic Forest. And they created Instituto Terra, a nature reserve and institute for reforestation, conservation and environmental education.

Salgado lived with some of the tribes protected by the National Indian Foundation of Brazil. “These Indians in the forest, they are integrated with the water, the ground, the forest, the animals,” he says. “It’s wonderful to be there with them.”

Salgado says they often arrived surrounded by birds and other animals, a large family rich in biodiversity. He says he slept in hammocks next to them and spoke through interpreters.

“Once a guy asked me, Sebastião, give me your knife when you leave.” I said, “I can’t give it to you because I can’t corrupt your culture. It’s forbidden.” He said, “OK, but your knife is so important. When you’re getting ready to fly in this little plane, just throw your knife over the forest. I know this forest like the lines of my hand. I can find your knife inside the forest.’ “

Salgado didn’t leave his knife behind, but he set up temporary outdoor studios, draping tall black backdrops from the trees. He says he did it to highlight the people and distinguish them from the exuberant forest. He produced many portraits of women and men wearing elaborate headdresses and makeup, children playing with sloths, families sleeping in hammocks and paddling canoes down the river.

Salgado says his Amazon photo exhibition is linked to indigenous and environmental movements in Brazil. It includes videos of tribal leaders talking about the destruction of the rainforest.

“They know they are in danger of disappearing, that the Bolsonaro government is destroying the forest at very high speed,” Salgado explains. “They are desperate to protect the earth, and they are using this show to talk about this issue.”

Like them, Salgado accuses the outgoing Brazilian government of further endangering and eroding the Amazon. “They are real bandits,” he said. “What they are doing, not only in the Amazon but elsewhere in Brazil, is a disaster.”

The photographer longed for a new president, and just days ago Brazilians elected leftist leader Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva.

Salgado also says he hopes that in 50 years his exhibition Amazon is not the documentation of a lost forest, a lost indigenous people or a lost world.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Transcription

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Photographer Sebastiao Salgado has been documenting the Amazon in his native Brazil for decades. His new exhibit of rainforest photos is now on display at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. NPR’s Mandalit del Barco reports on the North American premiere.

MANDALIT DEL BARCO, BYLINE: In two large gallery spaces, you hear a soundscape of the Amazon rainforest – birds, monkeys, insects, frogs and people’s voices. The sound showcases Sebastiao Salgado’s photos – over 200 large-scale black-and-white images that seem almost backlit.

You use all the natural light.

SEBASTIAO SALGADO: Only natural light – I don’t know how to use artificial light.

DEL BARCO: He captured lush tropical trees, dramatic clouds, the winding river, as well as the biodiversity of the jungle.

JEFFREY RUDOLPH: It’s a great show. The images are enchanting.

DEL BARCO: Jeffrey Rudolph is the president and CEO of the California Science Center, which hosts the “Amazonia” exhibit.

RUDOLPH: You learn a lot about the forest, unexpected things about the Amazon, the mountains of the Amazon, the rivers that fly. The Amazon is a unique system in which it creates its own rain.

DEL BARCO: In some photos you can see huge rain clouds, huge waterfalls and misty peaks. Salgado says he flew with the Brazilian military over some of the most inaccessible areas to capture them with his camera.

SALGADO: The Amazon is like paradise. The light is amazing. The clouds are amazing. People – amazing.

DEL BARCO: The 78-year-old photographer lives in Paris and has traveled to over 130 countries capturing images of genocide, famine, war and natural disasters. But he always came back to Brazil, where he grew up in another rainforest along the Atlantic. For years he and his wife, Lelia, worked to restore a portion of the Atlantic Forest that had been damaged. They also created a nature reserve and an institute for reforestation, conservation and environmental education.

Salgado made more than 58 trips to the Amazon, where he lived with some of the hundreds of tribes protected by the National Indian Foundation of Brazil.

SALGADO: You saw some in the forest. They are integrated with water, soil, forest, animals.

DEL BARCO: Salgado says they often arrived surrounded by birds and other animals. He says he slept in hammocks next to them and spoke through interpreters.

SALGADO: They were never interested in my cameras, in my satellite phone. Of no interest. They were very interested in my knife because my knife has a use for them. Once a guy asked, Sebastian, give me your knife when you leave.

DEL BARCO: Salgado set up an outdoor studio, draping large black backdrops to shoot portraits. For example, women wearing elaborate headdresses and face paints stare at his camera. Salgado says his “Amazonia” exhibit is linked to indigenous and environmental movements in Brazil. It includes videos of tribal leaders talking about the destruction of the rainforest.

(SOUND EXCERPT FROM AN ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON: (non-English language spoken).

SALGADO: They know that they are in danger of disappearing, that the government of Brazil – the Bolsonaro government – ​​is destroying the forests at very high speed, and they are desperate to protect the land. And they use this show to talk about this problem.

DEL BARCO: Like them, Salgado accuses the outgoing Brazilian government of further endangering and eroding the Amazon.

SALGADO: They are real bandits. What they are doing not only in the Amazon, but elsewhere in Brazil, is a disaster.

DEL BARCO: The photographer longed for a new president, and just days ago Brazilians elected leftist leader Luis Inacio Lula da Silva. Salgado also says he hopes that in 50 years his “Amazonia” exhibit will not be a documentation of a lost forest, a lost indigenous people, a lost world.

Mandalit del Barco, NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

]]>
New Photos Show China’s Artificial Islands Are Highly Developed Military Bases — Radio Free Asia https://photobolsillo.com/new-photos-show-chinas-artificial-islands-are-highly-developed-military-bases-radio-free-asia/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 08:42:22 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/new-photos-show-chinas-artificial-islands-are-highly-developed-military-bases-radio-free-asia/ New images have emerged showing airfields and other structures on some of China’s man-made islands in the South China Sea which the US says have been “fully militarized”. Getty Image photographer Ezra Acayan has gained flight access near a number of reefs and rocks that China has reclaimed and turned into military bases with radar […]]]>

New images have emerged showing airfields and other structures on some of China’s man-made islands in the South China Sea which the US says have been “fully militarized”.

Getty Image photographer Ezra Acayan has gained flight access near a number of reefs and rocks that China has reclaimed and turned into military bases with radar stations, airstrips and artillery installations.

Photos taken on Oct. 25 show another dimension of China’s man-made islands, so far mostly captured on satellite images.

US Indo-Pacific Commander, Adm. John C. Aquilinosaid in March that China had fully militarized at least three man-made islands, including Mischief Reef, Subi Reef and Fiery Cross, all in the Spratly archipelago over which Beijing claims “historic rights”.

Life on Fiery Cross

Getty photos provide detailed details of People’s Liberation Army (PLA) installations on Mischief Reef, Gaven Reefs, Subi Reef, Cuarteron Reef, Fiery Cross Reef and Hughes Reef – six of the 15 spratly Chinese-occupied formations.

Fiery Cross Reef appears to be one of the most developed, with a fully operational airfield, hangars, other large buildings, and radomes, or domes with radar equipment inside.

A new type of building spotted on Fiery Cross, as well as Mischief and Subi Reefs, is a garage-like structure that could house missile launchers, analysts say.

“I assume the sea-facing garages are for inclined cruise missile launchers,” wrote Tom Shugart, deputy principal investigator at the Center for a New American Security. on Twitter.

Another analyst, Tyler Rogoway, editor of defense news portal The War Zone, said they could “be used to house, maintain and rapidly deploy” launchers used to fire surface-to-air missiles, anti-ship or ground-to-ground. missiles.

Shugart also noted other details such as “a car driving around Fiery Cross and someone walking down a street”.

“It’s not the crowd, but it’s not nothing either,” he wrote.

Three weeks ago Chinese state media reported that there is a growing population of more than 5,000 “officers and soldiers stationed” on the islands and reefs that China occupies in the South China Sea.

A KJ-500 military aircraft on the runway at Fiery Cross, October 25, 2022. CREDIT: Ezra Acayan/Getty Images

Radomes and turrets

In one of the Fiery Cross images, a KJ-500 airborne early warning and control aircraft is visible on the runway.

“The image of a KJ-500 on the runway is compelling and confirms that the PLA still conducts regular aerial patrols off the islands,” said Greg Poling, director of the Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). said FRG.

“It’s been going on since 2020,” he added.

According to The War Zone’s Rogoway, the KJ-500 and other intelligence-gathering and submarine-hunting aircraft “operate frequently out of the airfield there.”

Radomes, turrets, and close-in weapons systems to detect and destroy incoming missiles and aircraft are common features of all artificial islands.

On Subi Reef, the main track is blocked by several objects, possibly vehicles or carts.

“This is a dangerous act, hostile to anyone else flying in the area,” because pilots of an aircraft in genuine distress may miss the blockade and crash, according to Shugart.

“This again belies the idea that these islands were built for everyone’s safe navigation,” the Fort Hood-based analyst said.

“These are military bases, period.”

China and five other parties claim parts of the South China Sea, including features that the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea calls reefs and rocks, not islands.

By law, reefs and rocks have much more limited rights to natural resources than islands.

Beijing has developed at least seven artificial islands, creating 1,295 hectares (3,200 acres) of new land since 2013, according to CSIS’ Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative.

On a trip to Washington in 2015, Chinese leader Xi Jinping said “China has no intention of continuing to militarize” man-made islands in the South China Sea, but critics say they develop the offensive capacity of the PLA and threaten other countries nearby.

]]>
Proliferation of Consumer Drones in Ukraine – The Catalyst https://photobolsillo.com/proliferation-of-consumer-drones-in-ukraine-the-catalyst/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 07:35:18 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/proliferation-of-consumer-drones-in-ukraine-the-catalyst/ October 28, 2022 | NOTICE | By AJ Fabbri | Artwork by Elizabeth White On a sunny October morning, a Da-Jiang Innovations Mavic drone with a broken propeller fell from the sky and ended up on an agricultural plot in the Donetsk region of Ukraine. Was he shot? Caught in a net? Zapped by a […]]]>

October 28, 2022 | NOTICE | By AJ Fabbri | Artwork by Elizabeth White

On a sunny October morning, a Da-Jiang Innovations Mavic drone with a broken propeller fell from the sky and ended up on an agricultural plot in the Donetsk region of Ukraine. Was he shot? Caught in a net? Zapped by a laser? No, no and no. His unexpected attacker, to the internet’s surprise, was another Mavic. This one-of-a-kind combat test makes the proliferation of drones in armed conflict virtually inevitable.

If you’re interested in cinematography, chances are you’ve heard of DJI. The Shenzhen, China-based company has empowered amateurs and professionals alike to shoot incredible footage with the stability, ease, and cost-effectiveness that makes helicopter-mounted cameras nearly obsolete. Released in 2016, the Mavic Pro’s portability and $999 price tag launched DJI’s flagship line of consumer drones, which has since propelled it to a 70% market share in the industry.

On the other side of the spectrum are military drones. Famous for their extensive use under President Obama, who authorized 542 strikes that killed an estimated 3,797 people in the Middle East and North Africa, they have become a staple of the US military-industrial complex. Military drones have proven effective in ending lives. They have also proven to be expensive, with prices exceeding $200 million per unit, pushing the military drone market to $11.73 billion in 2022.

The use of drones in war and espionage operations is nothing new; neither are their uses in film, surveying, and agriculture. Even the Birds Aren’t Real movement, often ridiculed for its claims that birds are government surveillance drones, is onto something. In 2018 news broke that more than 30 Chinese government and military agencies were using bird drones to spy on civilians, with Computer Network reporting that “they are called doves and they do not come in peace”.

In the Ukraine War, both sides use small, hard-to-detect consumer DJI drones to scout enemy positions and plan ambushes. Military reconnaissance drones which are much cheaper than combat drones still cost upwards of $35,000. The $2049 price tag of DJI’s Mavic 3, their most expensive Mavic, makes it a much more attractive purchase than a similar military drone despite the sacrifices in range and battery life.

Reports have shown Ukrainian troops flying drones to direct precise artillery fire, using them as reconnaissance units alongside larger drones dropping grenades, and modifying them with thermal imagery to find Russian targets in dense forests and at night. Much to the dismay of DJI, which has banned the sale of their drones to Russia and Ukraine because they “absolutely deplore any use of [their] harmful products,” these tactics have been commonplace for months.

Unlike reconnaissance and DJI-approved apps, drone combat is new. On October 13, 2022, Ukrainian broadcaster and activist Serhiy Prytula tweeted the first known video of this type of military engagement. The clip, recorded on a Ukrainian Mavic drone, shows an unsuspecting Russian drone on which the Ukrainian operator sneaks up and collides from behind. As the Russian drone’s propeller breaks and it begins to fall from the sky, footage shows it is also a DJI Mavic. Now that Ukraine has demonstrated the previously unrealized offensive capabilities of small drones through aerial ramming, war zones are sure to see a dramatic increase in the prevalence of the tactic.

After doing research for this article, I couldn’t help but wonder what owners of DJI drones who use them peacefully would think of their military applications. Would they have ethical or moral objections? Ben Curry ’21, a photographer-director who uses a DJI Mavic for his work, gave me some clarification on this: “It makes sense that it is used in wartime. It’s incredibly profitable. You don’t have to risk a human life. […] If I was at war, I would probably use my drone.

Russia and Ukraine seem to agree with Ben. DJI’s ban on sales to the two countries didn’t amount to much; the Russian military has found ways around the ban, and Ukrainian forces receive many of their drones through donations from civilians and foreigners. Although it may go against DJI’s code of ethics, defending Ukraine is a virtuous use of consumer drones. Technological advances are often points of no return; once established, there is no turning back. Like many technologies, drones are tools and the ethical debate around them should focus on how they are used, not whether they exist.

]]>
2022 Wildlife Photographer of the Year Winners https://photobolsillo.com/2022-wildlife-photographer-of-the-year-winners/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 09:54:28 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/2022-wildlife-photographer-of-the-year-winners/ October 25, 2022 London’s Natural History Museum 58th Wildlife Photographer of the Year Winners were announced, with American photographer Karine Aigne winning first prize for an image of a ball of cactus bees. The Big Buzz, wildlife photographer of the year, winning photo. Photo: Karine Aigne. At least three Australian photographers are highly recommended: underwater […]]]>

October 25, 2022

London’s Natural History Museum 58th Wildlife Photographer of the Year Winners were announced, with American photographer Karine Aigne winning first prize for an image of a ball of cactus bees.

The Big Buzz, wildlife photographer of the year, winning photo. Photo: Karine Aigne.

At least three Australian photographers are highly recommended: underwater photographer Scott Portelli, Melbourne photojournalist Doug Gimesy and NSW photographer Calumn Hockey.

the image of Aigne, The big buzz, shows ordinarily solitary cactus bees in a “mating ball,” an event that occurs once a year in the southern US desert. The male bees explore the ground in search of a mate, and when a female emerges from a burrow in the ground, the males jostle and pile on top of her to ensure their chance to father the next generation.

“Wings roar, males arrive at the ball of buzzing bees rolling right into the picture,” said Rosamund “Roz” Kidman Cox, chair of the Wildlife Photographer of the Year judging panel. “The sense of movement and intensity is shown at bee-level magnification and transforms what are small cactus bees into great competitors for a single female.”

Aigne hadn’t expected to find the bees. She came across the fiercely competitive mating ritual while walking around a Texas ranch, noticing “the ground suddenly became pockmarked with hundreds of volcano-like turrets” and thought to herself “what kind of ants are they?”. Upon closer inspection, she discovered that it was the cactus bees.

“I had never seen them before,” she explains, although she had visited the ranch for many years, “and I had no idea what I was looking at at first.”

“The tiny world of animals is a world that we often overlook and so often take for granted, and ironically it is the basis of the structure of all life,” she said. “What I love most about this image is that it shows most people something they’ve never seen before – it enlarges a small world and puts the life of a small bee on the stage of the word.”

Here’s a little more information about bees, courtesy of the Natural History Museum:

The typical image of bees is usually that of a large colony buzzing around a honeycomb, but the vast majority of the 16,000 known species of bees are actually solitary.

These solitary bees play a vital role in pollinating plants, including many of the ones we eat. But the biology of many of these species remains poorly understood. For example, in the case of the cactus bee, it is still unclear why it normally lives a solitary life, but then amass in large numbers during this mating event.

Learning more about where, when and how these amazing creatures mate will help protect them and in turn contribute to our fight to protect the planet from human impacts and rapid climate change.

Dr. Doug Gurr, director of the museum, remarks: “Wildlife photographers give us unforgettable glimpses into the lives of wildlife, sharing never-before-seen details, fascinating behaviors and frontline reporting on climate and biodiversity crises. . “These images demonstrate their admiration and appreciation for the natural world and the urgent need for action to protect it.”

Now let’s move on to the Australians.

Gimesy’s photo, Wombat Lockdown, is among the top five rated films in the wildlife photojournalism category. It shows Emily Small, founder of the Goongerah Wombat Orphanage, working on a couch during the Covid lockdown with two wombat orphans sleeping in a pocket.

Locking wombats. Highly recommended in the wildlife photojournalism category.

“To help prepare them for a life in the wild, including preparing their gut with the right microbes, Emily let them munch on grass and dirt she brought from their natural habitat 450 kilometers away. , and gave them sticks to chew. But like rodent teeth, their teeth just keep growing, so they would often gnaw on things to wear them down, like his furniture,” Gimesy said. “She could only leave her apartment for about an hour every hour during this time – that was when they were napping.”

The wombats were found alive in the pouch of their mothers, who were killed by cars. The baby wombats normally went to the Goongerah Wombat Orphanage, but Small brought them home to feed them regularly during the lockdown.

Hockey, also highly regarded in the wildlife photojournalism category, captured Up to a gum treean aerial photo taken with a drone showing environmental activists examining the impact of deforestation in Tasmania.

Up to a gum tree. Highly recommended in the wildlife photojournalism category. Photo: Calumn Hockey.

“Calumn’s composition contrasts a single remaining tree with the devastation of the forest glade below,” the jury said. ‘Environmentalists framed in the image had climbed a Tasmanian gum oak tree to assess the damage after the old growth forest was cleared for mining.’

Hockey points out that it’s “almost 50 years since protests against dams and logging in Tasmania’s wilderness areas made headlines in Australia and then around the world.” Since then, conservationists have continued to try to stop the logging of ancient forests. Although this protest is about mining, there are many threats to Tasmania’s old growth forest, the biggest of which is logging.

Portelli’s photo, Dual Interesthighly commended in the Animal Portraits category, shows an inquisitive sea lion appearing to observe a camouflaged leafy sea dragon.

The image, captured off the coast of Cape Le Grand National Park in Western Australia, is part of Portelli’s ongoing intrigue with the leafy sea dragon, which can be found along the southern coasts of Australia. Australia, often hiding among seaweed and seagrass.

“Without these kelp forests, leafy sea dragons are unable to camouflage themselves or take shelter and sea lions are forced to hunt in open waters, risking attacks from great white sharks and killer whales. Scott’s dual portrait captures a rarely seen interaction between these two elusive species.

As usual, the gallery of Wildlife Photographer of the Year winners showcases some of the best work documenting wildlife. The 2022 awards attracted more than 38,000 entries from photographers from 93 countries. The top 100 entries, including photos of the three Australians, will feature in a traveling world exhibition which visits Australia each year. Previous hosts have included the Australian National Maritime Museum in Sydney and the National Woolen Museum in Geelong.

Here are some winning images. Click here to view them all.

Baleen beauty. Young big winner of the title and winner of the 15-17 year old category. Photo: Katanyou Wuttichaitanakorn.
Perfect puff. Winner of the Animal Portraits category. Photo: José Juan Hernández Martínez.

Bear House. Winner of the Urban Wildlife category. Photo: Dmitry Kokh.
Death of Ndakasi. Winner of the photojournalism category. Photo: Brent Stirton.
Celestial pink flamingos. Winner of the Natural Artistry category. Photo: Junji Takasago
The magic morels. Winner of the plants and mushrooms category. Photo: Agorastos Papatsanis.
The dying lake. Wetlands – Winner of the Overview category. Photo: Daniel Nunez.
Shooting star. Winner of the underwater category. Photo: Tony Wu.
New life for the tohorā. Oceans – Winner of The Bigger Picture category. Photo: Richard Robinson.

]]>
Aerial photos of Watford Junction and the city center in the past https://photobolsillo.com/aerial-photos-of-watford-junction-and-the-city-center-in-the-past/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/aerial-photos-of-watford-junction-and-the-city-center-in-the-past/ One of the best ways to see how Watford have changed over the years is from the air. In June 2003, former Watford Observer photographer Pete Stevens flew with Firecrest Aviation from Elstree to photograph the town and surrounding area. We are delighted to be able to share these images again, starting this week with […]]]>

One of the best ways to see how Watford have changed over the years is from the air.

In June 2003, former Watford Observer photographer Pete Stevens flew with Firecrest Aviation from Elstree to photograph the town and surrounding area.

We are delighted to be able to share these images again, starting this week with aerial views of Stephenson Way and Radlett Road, Watford Junction and surrounding areas and the city centre.

Scroll through the fantastic images below and see if you can spot your home or the place you used to live, or a store or business that’s no longer there?

Watford Observer: What the Harlequin Center looked like from the air in 2003What the Harlequin Center looked like from the air in 2003 (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation)

We’ll be bringing you more fantastic aerial photos of Watford and the surrounding area over the coming weeks.

Watford Observer: The roundabout connecting Stephenson Way to Radlett RoadThe roundabout connecting Stephenson Way to Radlett Road (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation)

Watford Observer: a view from above with the link road to the M1 in the foregroundView from above with the M1 slip road in the foreground (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation)

Watford Observer: Trains arrive at the platforms at Watford JunctionTrains arrive at the platforms at Watford Junction (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation)

Watford Observer: a wider view with Watford Junction at the centerA wider view with Watford Junction in the center (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation)

Watford Observer: The Sainsbury's ring road, past the YMCA and Charter Place towards HarlequinThe Sainsbury’s ring road, in front of the YMCA and Charter Place towards the Harlequin (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation)

Watford Observer: A higher view with the Town Hall visible at the top of the imageA view from above with the town hall visible at the top of the image (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation)

Watford Observer: View of Harlequin and Lower High StreetLooking down on the Harlequin area and Lower High Street (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation)

Watford Observer: From St Mary's Church in the upper left, the main street meanders through the middle of this image From St Mary’s Church in the upper left, the main street meanders through the middle of this image (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation)

Watford Observer: What the heart of Watford looked like from above almost 20 years agoWhat the heart of Watford looked like from above almost 20 years ago (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation)

Watford Observer: overlooking Exchange Road with the church car park prominent at the bottom of this photoOverlooking Exchange Road with the church car park prominent at the bottom of this photo (Photo: Pete Stevens / Firecrest Aviation)

]]>
Cecilia Vicuna: Brain Forest Quipu; Richard Mosse: Broken Specter review – the worn out world | Art and design https://photobolsillo.com/cecilia-vicuna-brain-forest-quipu-richard-mosse-broken-specter-review-the-worn-out-world-art-and-design/ Sun, 16 Oct 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://photobolsillo.com/cecilia-vicuna-brain-forest-quipu-richard-mosse-broken-specter-review-the-worn-out-world-art-and-design/ JTwo vast fabric drapes trail their hems along the floor at opposite ends of Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall. Each is created from cascading lengths of flimsy cotton and gauze, unspun wool, knotted rope, tattered netting and linen – all white. Swaying lightly in the shifting air, they look like ghostly remnants of a once-grand culture. […]]]>

JTwo vast fabric drapes trail their hems along the floor at opposite ends of Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall. Each is created from cascading lengths of flimsy cotton and gauze, unspun wool, knotted rope, tattered netting and linen – all white. Swaying lightly in the shifting air, they look like ghostly remnants of a once-grand culture.

That’s exactly what they are, in a sense: modern versions of the ancient quipu, an Andean method of recording everything from memories to messages to cosmological maps using structures of strands, knots and textiles. The Chilean artist, poet and activist Cecilia Vicuna (b. 1948) is best known for these quipu recreations. Usually they are smaller and worked in brilliant colors, but here she commemorates the violent destruction of entire territories belonging to indigenous peoples from Brazil to Colombia to Chile. The drapes rise to the full height of the room, 27 meters high, in all their spectral pallor.

At first, the associations are made with real materials. With old wedding dresses, veils and sails from ships, with fishing nets and trailing bandages, sheets and shrouds, sheets of gold – some of which sparkle – and the banners and flags of old armies. There is the humble allusion to the linen fluttering on a rope, but also to the tents and pavilions and the massive weavings carried out by entire communities.

But one of the drapes is looser and more easily penetrated, and once inside, looking up, there are the compelling accents of the rainforest, vast trees converging in dizzying vistas above among the daylight flakes. And everything hangs on something that looks like a spider’s web or a dream catcher. Around you the bands fall like trunks or vines, some of them wrapping around curious objects pulled from the Thames by local Latinas – mussel shells, bones, pottery shards washed by the rhythms of River.

“The Fabric of Life Hanging in Tatters”: Brain Forest Quipu in the Turbine Hall. Photography: Guy Bell/Rex/Shutterstock

Woven into it all is a sonic element of voices, birds, forest echoes, field recordings and musical compositions, encompassing sudden silences, led by Colombian composer Ricardo Gallo. These sounds seem to come from the heights. You can move around in it, as with the curtains, with an extraordinary feeling of intimacy which is a feat in such a large canyon as this one.

Vicuña placed documentary interviews with indigenous protesters on screens throughout the building. This is done discreetly. It feels one piece with the whole installation, which is highly political at its core and yet airy and delicate in its nuance. He humanizes the industrial height of the Turbine Hall and softens its atmosphere, a monumental work that is both soft and strong.

Almost inevitably, I heard a visitor dismiss it as a pile of old rags, but so it is in its elegiac subtlety: the worn-out world, the degraded culture, the tattered fabric of life. What could happen – has already happened – when the living green earth that sustains humanity is burned or killed and perishes into nothing but ghostly white memories.

Across the Thames, at 180 The Strand, the Irish conceptual photographer Richard Mosse went hard the other way in surprising color with the exact same subject. Mosse’s billboard-sized photographs – of refugee camps, African armies, border skirmishes – are rightly praised for their terrible and even terrifying beauty. Lately, he’s been spending time in the Amazon, sending drones over forests to record poisonings, illegal logging and fires.

The resulting aerial images are literally incredible: dense vegetation (or its aftermath) registering in brilliant pinks, blues and purples, turquoise rivers meandering through reds as rich as a New York autumn. England, close-ups of Venus flytraps glistening gold in the sun. The eye registers sensational glory – and cognitive dissonance. What you see is strange, impossible and yet metaphorically true.

Just as Mosse used military-grade thermographic cameras in war-torn Congo, he uses advanced satellite technology to record eco-crime in the Amazon Basin. So, for example, the more intense blues of a typical sawmill indicate fresh, illegally harvested wood that will be mixed with the faded blue of older wood for export.

excerpt from the film Broken Specter by Richard Mosse, 2022
“Crimson isle”: a still from the film Broken Spectre by Richard Mosse, 2022. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

And the beautiful purple island surrounded by rainbows of psychedelic pixie dust is a last patch of growing forest surrounded by the scorched dust of industrial deforestation where the Brazilian government has razed land to build hydroelectric power plants. Take a good look and you can actually make out charred, skeletal trees.

Mosse turns to black and white for his outstanding photographs of indigenous activists standing alone among once-beautiful glades, but also of impoverished miners illegally poisoning rivers with mercury to feed on a few handfuls of gold. He is still alive on both sides of human tragedy. And his enormous close-ups of a single leaf or a single insect evoke horror on a macro-micro scale.

The centerpiece of his latest project is Shattered Specter, an epic four-screen installation that almost defies comprehension with its devastating vision of ecological disaster. Fires rage in the forests, woods explode in horrific thunderclaps, fireballs rush through the clouds. Trucks try to make their way through the black smoke, flames and smoke are shown up close and high in the sky. The soundtrack, by Ben Frost, is so apocalyptic it could be the end of the world: a perfect match for the conflagration raging towards you. No disaster movie has ever been so real.

Mosse merges reportage and fine art photography for unique effect. You study his images as much for their knowledge as for their visual impact. And it’s no coincidence that 180 The Strand, which focuses on the convergence of art and technology, also features new cinematic installations by digital artists. all universal next to.

The universal superconsumers of everything.
Vast creatures pass “before your enchanted eyes”: a photo from Superconsumers, 2019, part of Lifeforms by Universal Everything.

A dancer duets with a robot that mimics his movements while simultaneously transforming into other robots. Multi-colored, life-size creatures covered in glowing fibers twirl along a revolving catwalk. A vast creature, something like a yeti, strides into the future while transforming into balloons, clouds, and architectural structures before your enchanted eyes.

This ever-changing figure is reminiscent of Umberto Boccioni’s futuristic sculpture of a walking man, and everything here takes up art (or life) with such fascinating ingenuity that it feels like the dawn of a new kind of magic lantern. There’s even a screen where your own rapid arm movements can conjure a rainforest on screen: humanity’s disaster reversed by humanity, like a miraculous dream.

Star ratings (out of five)
Cecilia Vicuna: Brain Forest Quipu
★★★★
Richard Mosse: Shattered Specter ★★★★★
Universal All: Life Forms ★★★★★

]]>